ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down

Author Topic: creating sound deadining panels  (Read 4940 times)

jeffhtg (Jeff Kenney)

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1019
creating sound deadining panels
« on: August 08, 2008, 02:51:39 pm »

I can't find this in the search and I know some people have talked about it before. I have a room that is going down to brick and need to make some acoustic panels for a very large hard surface. Looking for something that could be painted.. anyone got any hot links?
Logged

Tom Young

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2620
Re: creating sound deadining panels
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2008, 03:15:10 pm »

Almost anything used for absorption cannot be painted without losing a significant degree of effectiveness.  The exception would be absorptive material with a fairly open type of grill (over it) such as perf metal.

Diffusive treatments are much more likely to be paintable without disrupting what they have been designed to do.

If it is absorption that you need, I suggest you first decide what type to use (area of panels, their thickness and the distance from the wall or ceiling) and then wrap them in a fire-rated fabric that matches or compliments your surrounding interior architecture.
Logged
Tom Young
Electroacoustic Design Services
Oxford CT
Tel: 203.888.6217
Email: dbspl@earthlink.net
www.dbspl.com

Chad Johnson

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 285
Re: creating sound deadining panels
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2008, 03:40:56 pm »

I always us Tectum Panels. They come on large sheets, they can be painted. Fir them out from the wall with Roxull fire rated fibre wool behind and your good to go. With a two inch insulation behind they are very broad band and very absorbent.  Everything is fire rated and paintable to match any decor with out hurting fire or acoustical performance. You'll want to spray them first and touch up with brush/roller once installed. The website has all of the ratings for absorption coefficients with different combinations of spacing and insulation.

Polycylindrical absorbers for bass and mid/hi diffusion can be painted as well.
--Chad
Logged
Digital consoles are so 2006. The real future is in steering bass arrays.

Duane Massey

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2189
    • http://www.ozknozz.com
Re: creating sound deadining panels
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2008, 07:34:28 pm »

+1 on Tom's reply; you can build the panels in any shape that appeals to you, and even do them in varying layers.
Logged
Duane Massey
Houston, Texas, USA

SteveKirby

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2105
Re: creating sound deadining panels
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2008, 07:43:24 pm »

If you do some research into RPG diffusers, you will find that in spite of the convoluted math used to make them sound special, the actual progression of cavities is quite straightforward and easily managed in a decorative remodel.  Kind of like a "quadratic" waveguide being one with a straight flare.
Logged

John Birchman, CTS

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 560
    • http://www.jrbtechnical.com/
Re: creating sound deadining panels
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2008, 09:02:15 pm »

ATS Acoustics has both pre-made panels in assorted sizes and colored coverings (ASTM E84 fire rating as option), as well as selling the materials for diy.

http://www.atsacoustics.com/

John
Logged
John Birchman, CTS
Freelance AV and Stage Technician
JRB Technical
Lake Buena Vista, FL

Dan Chujko

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3
    • http://www.DanChujkoAssoc.com
Re: creating sound deadening panels
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2008, 09:44:17 pm »

FYI, Tectum panels have a couple of issues but seem to be widely used.

On an installation of a TV/production studio that I was brought in on after the fact, the contractor decided to save a few bucks and order the 4'x 12'panels instead of the standard 4'x 8' sheets.  The GC mounted the sheets long ways (12' wide - horizontal)with the wall studs too far apart (according to the mfg)and after a few heating/cooling/high humidity cycles the tectum bowed and dipped to the point that it looked like a 20'h x 68' basket weaved wall!!!  A true ugly & costly situation for the GC.

Also tectum even in the best scenario of max depth from back of product to structural wall does not absorb very well from 500 Hz and below.

Original topic was sound panels.  Was the OP looking absorbing, stopping or both?
Logged

Chad Johnson

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 285
Re: creating sound deadening panels
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2008, 04:00:30 am »

Dan Chujko wrote on Sat, 09 August 2008 18:44

FYI, Tectum panels have a couple of issues but seem to be widely used.

On an installation of a TV/production studio that I was brought in on after the fact, the contractor decided to save a few bucks and order the 4'x 12'panels instead of the standard 4'x 8' sheets.  The GC mounted the sheets long ways (12' wide - horizontal)with the wall studs too far apart (according to the mfg)and after a few heating/cooling/high humidity cycles the tectum bowed and dipped to the point that it looked like a 20'h x 68' basket weaved wall!!!  A true ugly & costly situation for the GC.

Also tectum even in the best scenario of max depth from back of product to structural wall does not absorb very well from 500 Hz and below.

Original topic was sound panels.  Was the OP looking absorbing, stopping or both?


Good question, I assumed absorbtion panels.

I fir Tectum panels with 2X2 and/or 2X4 and have never had a bowing problem and always use 12 foot lengths. I've found them quite accurate for down to 250hz or so and then go to corner traps or poly diffusers for absorbing lower freq's.

I like them because they are fairly simple to use, fairly cost effective, can be painted to match any decor, and are fire rated.
Logged
Digital consoles are so 2006. The real future is in steering bass arrays.

Brad Weber

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2477
Re: creating sound deadining panels
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2008, 10:03:45 am »

Chad Johnson wrote on Fri, 08 August 2008 15:40

Everything is fire rated and paintable to match any decor with out hurting fire or acoustical performance.

Tectum has a Marketing Bulletin specifically on this topic where they define using one specific paint that comes in 50 gallon drums and very specific environmental conditions, sprayer characteristics, etc. for the application.  They also state that the panels should be painted in place and brush and roller application are specifically not recommended.  The fact is that it is quite easy to adversely affect the performance if one does not follow the manufacturer's recommendations.

There are actually two steps involved in interior acoustical treatments.  The first is determining what are the proper treatments, then there is figuring out what products meet those requirements.  These requirements usually go beyond the acoustical performance to include aspects such as durability, impact resistance and of course, cost, but they will affect what is appropriate and some more information of the application or specific requirements would help.  Blanket application of any product without consideration for the application is poor practice.  For example, even on a basic level the solutions may be quite different if this is a boardroom or a gym or if the sources are speech versus full range music and so on.  
Logged
Brad Weber
muse Audio Video

jeffhtg (Jeff Kenney)

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1019
Re: creating sound deadining panels
« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2008, 08:27:17 pm »

The room in question is a nightclub. My problem is every wall is "armored" in plywood. I have done my best to array the speaker system to keep it off the walls - but in some places that simply cannot be done. I'm looking for general HF absorption in these areas where direct HF energy is exposed to solid walls.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.04 seconds with 18 queries.