ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 6   Go Down

Author Topic: How not to get into a ceiling  (Read 13886 times)

Dick Rees

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6592
Re: How not to get into a ceiling
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2008, 01:28:59 pm »

MattJones wrote on Mon, 04 August 2008 11:51

My favorite was the time I saw a guy stand at the top of a 6' ladder that was on top of five tiers of scaffolding.

Why do people do stupid stuff like that? And how the heck did he get the ladder up there?



index.php/fa/17246/0/

Unless you're these guys I'd give it a pass.
Logged
 Neo-Luddite, Rocket Surgeon
"Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain."

Brad Weber

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2477
Re: How not to get into a ceiling
« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2008, 02:16:04 pm »

Yeah, but even they have visible fall arrest provisions beyond when they hit the floor!
Logged
Brad Weber
muse Audio Video

Rob Warren

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 140
Re: How not to get into a ceiling
« Reply #12 on: August 04, 2008, 02:31:57 pm »

Quote:

Why do people do stupid stuff like that?


It's my experience that the management or even owners of the company pressure the people into taking risks because the company is too cheap or unorganized to rent a scissor lift or the right amount of scaffolding with all the safety equipment.  

The lift thing was always the money.  Don't have that in the budget. Actually had one owner say he used to take out the bottom x-brace supports on using scaffolding so he can fit it in the pews and get to the ceiling.  "kind of suggesting that I do that"
Wouldn't want to rent a boom knuckle lift that is made for this.

Maybe this is NOT the norm but I do genuinely feel for the guys that are in between there job and being safe as described above.

For the moron's that do it on their own...well what can I say.
Logged
Rob

Guest

  • Guest
Re: How not to get into a ceiling
« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2008, 04:20:52 pm »

Rob,

My question was more of a lamentation than anything else, as I have been on the receiving end of the "budget-minded" argument. I recently left a job partly because of sub-safe conditions such as the ones noted in this thread.

It's disheartening to be fussed at and ridiculed for being scared to go 25' in the air on rickety scaffolding and stand on a dry-rotted plank while juggling cables, tools, and what-not.

I decided recently that I'm not willing to do a job for an employer or client who is unwilling to spend the money necessary to make reasonable accommodations for the safety of their workers. It's not worth my safety and sanity.
Logged

Hal Bissinger/COMSYSTEC

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 487
    • http://www.comsystecusa.com
Re: How not to get into a ceiling
« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2008, 04:33:11 pm »

It's my experience that the management or even owners of the company pressure the people into taking risks because the company is too cheap or unorganized to rent a scissor lift or the right amount of scaffolding with all the safety equipment.

If you work for yourself and want to take chances like that it's one thing. If you allow or encourage your employees to work like that the risk you take is that you can lose everything and even face criminal charges in the likely event someone gets hurt.

-Hal

Duane Massey

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2189
    • http://www.ozknozz.com
Re: How not to get into a ceiling
« Reply #15 on: August 04, 2008, 08:26:41 pm »

Having been in this business for 40 years, I can say with no sense of shame OR pride that I have taken many risks on my own initiative. Most when I was much younger and convinced of my invincibility, a few as I've gotten older that I felt was a calculated risk, and I will probably take a few more risks before I die (possibly from a fall..) but I would never, ever allow someone working for me to take those same risks.

Scaffolding scares me more than any lift I've ever been on, but anytime you feel really, really comfortable on a device that sways or moves 25' in the air, maybe you should take a day to reflect on how important life really is. A little fear is healthy.

Logged
Duane Massey
Houston, Texas, USA

Brendan Maroney

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 142
Re: How not to get into a ceiling
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2008, 10:01:38 pm »

To the OP's pic... Sadly I've done that multiple times to plug in our drop mics at school... Only recently have I been stealing the janitors genie lift to do the more crazy stuff, but even at the theatre I work at, I'm almost always on the second to top or top of a ladder, albeit a Little Giant ladder, (slightly more sturdy).

Sick and tired of ladders,
Brendan
Logged

Charlie Zureki

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4369
Re: How not to get into a ceiling
« Reply #17 on: August 04, 2008, 11:08:10 pm »

Hal Bissinger/COMSYSTEC wrote on Mon, 04 August 2008 15:33

It's my experience that the management or even owners of the company pressure the people into taking risks because the company is too cheap or unorganized to rent a scissor lift or the right amount of scaffolding with all the safety equipment.

If you work for yourself and want to take chances like that it's one thing. If you allow or encourage your employees to work like that the risk you take is that you can lose everything and even face criminal charges in the likely event someone gets hurt.

-Hal



+1

 Also, in most states, you cannot be fired from your job for refusing what would "normally" be considered Unsafe.

Cheers,

Hammer
Logged
Be prepared, you'll need it!

Guest

  • Guest
Re: How not to get into a ceiling
« Reply #18 on: August 05, 2008, 11:22:52 am »

As I understand it, the laws governing hiring and firing of at-will employees are vague at best.

Of course, it's ridiculous to be fired for refusing to risk life and limb, but it's pretty easy to come up with some "other" reason to fire someone.

I think some of us are afraid it would become a "his word against mine" situation. Going against a dysfunctional system is arduous. Nobody wants to be the squeaky wheel. That's why we're now hearing about whistle-blower scandals in the airline industry over safety violations.
Logged

jeffhtg (Jeff Kenney)

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1019
Re: How not to get into a ceiling
« Reply #19 on: August 05, 2008, 12:04:07 pm »

I have seen some electricians around here do some stupid stuff. Not to long ago a guy crawled up into the drop ceiling in a 25' roof to pull some cable. He was crawling up there on the roof I-beams with no safety devices! I always see guys up on ridiculously high ladders standing at the top or doing something just plain stupid.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 6   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.059 seconds with 20 queries.