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Author Topic: How NOT to EQ  (Read 8484 times)

Jordan Ochocki

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How NOT to EQ
« on: January 16, 2008, 11:43:44 am »

These are screenshots taken from a Mackie DX8 controlling the in-house system at the performing arts center I work at.index.php/fa/13675/0/

This is the sub output eq, the other outputs are just as messed up.
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Jordan Ochocki

Sioux Falls, SD

Vince Byrne

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Re: How NOT to EQ
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2008, 11:59:01 am »

That is hideous. And +/-15dB range no less.  Shocked
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Jeff Babcock

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Re: How NOT to EQ
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2008, 12:53:01 pm »

Looks great to me.  A great way to make money for your reconing business that is..... Shocked

Many times systems would be better with NO eq than with the mess that so often ends up happening to them when "experts" touch them.

Michael 'Bink' Knowles

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Re: How NOT to EQ
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2008, 11:32:08 pm »

That's awful looking.   Shocked

Sound is about listening.

Reality check: if THAT AWFUL EQ makes the speakers sound good, then so be it.

-Bink
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Michael 'Bink' Knowles
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Iain_Macdonald

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Re: How NOT to EQ
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2008, 02:08:50 pm »

Hi,

That curve indicates to me, that someone is looking for output that the product is not giving them. (Or else they have a lack of knowledge). If you have a number of cabinets running off this feed, you might wish to check whether they are all matching polarity. I've seen this curve in a center where speakers were incorrectly wired. Don't just think that the plugs are wired correctly, so it must be OK. You might wish to check all the speakers. The clue is in your phrase: This is the sub output eq, the other outputs are just as messed up. A few hours with SMAART might be well spent.

They do have a xover to the subs etc., don't they????

Iain.
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Jordan Ochocki

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Re: How NOT to EQ
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2008, 08:08:54 pm »

Iain,

There is a x-over on the sub (albiet from a Bose system controller).  Unfortunately for me, the install is all Bose, supplemented by JBL SR-X's on sticks on the stage.  I've moved two of the Bose subs to the center of the proscenium, and the other two (dead hung in the ceiling) have been disconnected.

Currently, I have control for all speaker positions in that DX8.  Also, all Bose speakers are being processed by Bose system controllers.  Near as I can tell, these just apply some EQ and x-over (which I can bypass and do in the DX8 if I so desire).

I do plan on downloading the trial of Smaart to attempt to EQ and make sure delays are properly set (I say try because I have only tried Smaart one other time, and that was several years ago).

FYI, these curves were put in place by a previous Facility Manager.  He played pink noise and viewed the results on an RTA, then attempted to flatten the response.

Any tips on improving low-end intelligibility in a concert hall environment?

-Jordan
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Jordan Ochocki

Sioux Falls, SD

Iain_Macdonald

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Re: How NOT to EQ
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2008, 04:28:00 pm »

Hi,

In no particular order
1) Are you sure that the Bose controllers are in circuit.
2) Are all the speakers, all the same polarity.
3) How are they fed from the console. Is correct polarity maintained.
4) What does it sound like with the Mackie unit bypassed.

Any tips on improving low-end intelligibility in a concert hall environment?

Where to start? It depends on; the acoustics of the venue, the shape, placement of speakers, quality of the speaker system, quality of the source signal.

Iain.
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Tom Manchester

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Re: How NOT to EQ
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2008, 09:53:02 pm »

Here's one I pulled from an install at work that was EQ'd by the installers. +15 at 20hz is great for 100 watt 12" EV speakers!

index.php/fa/14063/0/
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-Tom
Electro Sound Systems

Ivan Beaver

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Re: How NOT to EQ
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2008, 10:01:24 pm »

Well at least they turned up the HPF to "counteract" the boost down low.

It is also not in a smile but rather a "twisted" grin-to just play with your mind Laughing
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For every complicated question-there is a simple- easy to understand WRONG answer.

Can I have some more talent in the monitors--PLEASE?

Ivan Beaver
dB Audio & Video Inc.
Danley Sound Labs

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Re: How NOT to EQ
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2008, 03:44:05 pm »

Wow!

That DX8 has the oddest EQ curve I think I have ever seen. I can't imagine a real-world scenario where that would actually make things better, except to undo the effects of some other wacky processing elsewhere in the signal chain.

I like the comment about the "twisted grin". I laugh on the inside when I walk into an amp room and see the gear 'smiling', beckoning me..."I'm so glad you're here to fix me!"

That TOA 1000 seems a bit melancholy, though. Maybe he's jealous of a DN370 that stole his thunder.
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