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Author Topic: Becoming the main soundman for my bluegrass band...  (Read 6431 times)

g'bye, Dick Rees

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Re: Becoming the main soundman for my bluegrass band...
« Reply #30 on: June 19, 2014, 12:44:53 pm »

I personally don't use the up then down method for ringing out.  I increase the gain of the whole system up to feedback, then eliminate the feedback by dropping the appropriate graphic control.  I then up the gain a bit more to find the next frequency - repeat three or four times.

This way, you will find out if a frequency which you have already cut requires any more cut as it will feedback again at a higher gain.

Ringing out is actually much easier to do than describe.  Try it out in an empty room and you will soon get the hang of it.


Steve.

Glad it works for you that way, but it does require some familiarity with relating sound to faders/bands whereas using the boost to identify/cut to taste is infinitely easier for someone new to the process as they've already got there mitts on the proper slider to deal with the "problem".  So I will continue to recommend  the "boost/cut" method as the easiest and most practical procedure.
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Becoming the main soundman for my bluegrass band...
« Reply #31 on: June 19, 2014, 01:14:53 pm »

Glad it works for you that way, but it does require some familiarity with relating sound to faders/bands whereas using the boost to identify/cut to taste is infinitely easier for someone new to the process as they've already got there mitts on the proper slider to deal with the "problem".  So I will continue to recommend  the "boost/cut" method as the easiest and most practical procedure.

I think you are right.  Whilst I don't have perfect pitch, as a musician, I'm quite good at relating the frequencies I hear to where they are on the graphic and can usually get very close.

You are absolutely right though - if you find it difficult relating sound to the numbers, the up/down method could be more suitable.

I have only ever used the method I outlined after being shown how to do it by a Peavey engineer in the 1980s.  I have no idea what we did before then.

Being shown how to ring out a system was quite a revelation at the time.  If I was a cartoon, a light bulb would have lit up above my head!


Steve.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2014, 01:18:02 pm by Steve M Smith »
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Blake Short

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Re: Becoming the main soundman for my bluegrass band...
« Reply #32 on: June 19, 2014, 05:27:50 pm »

Yeah i'm good at getting close as well.  also i have matched pitches on my instrument with feedback frequencies so i know where they are at... which helps a lot!  especially the mandolin cause i can get up in the lower 2k range.  I've also related that anything 4k and over is really unpleasant to the ears which helps me relate where they are at.

Would the boost/cut method work on my monitor mix as well or should i keep increasing the aux master until feedback starts and then cut that freq?  increasing gain seems to be starting to work for me.

also, should i be trying to smooth out the 31 band around spots that i have made a strong cut of 5db or so, or just leave that single cut alone and roll with it.
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g'bye, Dick Rees

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Re: Becoming the main soundman for my bluegrass band...
« Reply #33 on: June 19, 2014, 05:38:31 pm »

Yeah i'm good at getting close as well.  also i have matched pitches on my instrument with feedback frequencies so i know where they are at... which helps a lot!  especially the mandolin cause i can get up in the lower 2k range.  I've also related that anything 4k and over is really unpleasant to the ears which helps me relate where they are at.

Would the boost/cut method work on my monitor mix as well or should i keep increasing the aux master until feedback starts and then cut that freq?  increasing gain seems to be starting to work for me.

also, should i be trying to smooth out the 31 band around spots that i have made a strong cut of 5db or so, or just leave that single cut alone and roll with it.

Yes, the method will work for any mix, main or monitor.

You can "smooth out" if you wish, but remember that GEQ filters are wide enough to be fairly smooth as is.  What you can do, for instance, is look for octaves that are cut.  You can go back and readjust your initial cuts to restore a bit in the lower octave as removing energy in the octave(s) above will take a bit of pressure off of the lower octave, octaves being simply a doubling of frequency.

As I said, you'll gain some insight in how the different relationships work together with this method.  you'll encounter various results/phenomena and with a little thought and experimentation see (and hear) how you can make the system work for you.

Good luck and have fun.
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Blake Short

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Re: Becoming the main soundman for my bluegrass band...
« Reply #34 on: June 19, 2014, 06:59:00 pm »

Yes, the method will work for any mix, main or monitor.

You can "smooth out" if you wish, but remember that GEQ filters are wide enough to be fairly smooth as is.  What you can do, for instance, is look for octaves that are cut.  You can go back and readjust your initial cuts to restore a bit in the lower octave as removing energy in the octave(s) above will take a bit of pressure off of the lower octave, octaves being simply a doubling of frequency.

As I said, you'll gain some insight in how the different relationships work together with this method.  you'll encounter various results/phenomena and with a little thought and experimentation see (and hear) how you can make the system work for you.

Good luck and have fun.

yeah i had noticed that relationship and i remember reading something about the octaves building up from a lower frequency and causing the higher frequency to ring because of that... so this is making sense.
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