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Author Topic: History of the "California connector" used in mid-sized distros?  (Read 5145 times)

Robert Harker

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Does anyone know the origin of the "California connector"?  Who invented it, why and when?
« Last Edit: August 03, 2012, 02:03:57 pm by Robert Harker »
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Dennis Wiggins

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Re: History of the "California connector"?
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2012, 01:29:11 pm »

A picture of the type of connector you are referring to would help.  Perhaps a manufacturer and model number?

Is it one of these? 

http://www.apcmedia.com/salestools/SADE-5TNRML_R0_EN.pdf

-Dennis
« Last Edit: August 03, 2012, 04:36:19 pm by Dennis Wiggins »
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TJ (Tom) Cornish

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Re: History of the "California connector"?
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2012, 02:24:06 pm »

A picture of the type of connector you are rerferring to would help.  Perhaps a manufacturer and model number?

Is it one of these? 

http://www.apcmedia.com/salestools/SADE-5TNRML_R0_EN.pdf

-Dennis
http://www.stayonline.com/power-50a-connectors.aspx
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Robert Harker

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Re: History of the "California connector" used in mid-sized distros?
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2012, 02:45:19 pm »

The female connector is notable because it has a middle steel "stinger" that helps align the connector.
The male connector has a shroud that protects the blades.
All in all a much better connection for portable applications than a standard twistlock (NEMA locking) connector or (cringe) an electric dryer connector.
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Greg_Cameron

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Re: History of the "California connector" used in mid-sized distros?
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2012, 03:43:03 pm »

The female connector is notable because it has a middle steel "stinger" that helps align the connector.
The male connector has a shroud that protects the blades.
All in all a much better connection for portable applications than a standard twistlock (NEMA locking) connector or (cringe) an electric dryer connector.

FWIW, the Hubbell versions are a lot more heavy duty than the Leviton connectors pictured above. Worth the extra money IMHO.

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Dennis Wiggins

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Re: History of the "California connector" used in mid-sized distros?
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2012, 04:32:54 pm »

A hearsay/clue that I found...

"I believe the California plug gets its name from being developed as a safer connector for the early days of the Hollywood Film Studios. The first hi-ampereage connectors used in the studios were paddle plugs used in theatres, which were ungrounded. The California plug was grounded by the outer steel shroud, which also protected the male contact pins from damage when the cables are dragged around the set every day. The grounded shroud helps absorb the Arc-Flash if the connector is plugged or unplugged while energized. The paddle plug was notoriously dangerous for Arc-Flashes, especially in the older DC powered Theatres in the first years of electric lighting for the stage! "

-Dennis
« Last Edit: August 03, 2012, 04:34:41 pm by Dennis Wiggins »
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Greg_Cameron

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Re: History of the "California connector" used in mid-sized distros?
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2012, 02:46:01 pm »

A hearsay/clue that I found...

"I believe the California plug gets its name from being developed as a safer connector for the early days of the Hollywood Film Studios. The first hi-ampereage connectors used in the studios were paddle plugs used in theatres, which were ungrounded. The California plug was grounded by the outer steel shroud, which also protected the male contact pins from damage when the cables are dragged around the set every day. The grounded shroud helps absorb the Arc-Flash if the connector is plugged or unplugged while energized. The paddle plug was notoriously dangerous for Arc-Flashes, especially in the older DC powered Theatres in the first years of electric lighting for the stage! "

I actually got in touch with the folks at Hubbell and they basically said the same thing that Dennis found.

Greg
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