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 21 
 on: Today at 06:20:34 pm 
Started by Tom Bourke - Last post by Lee Buckalew
In the very compact switch category, I'm a big fan of the NetGear GS108T. It's a small 8 port managed switch that will allow you to disable the EEE features, which their other Prosafe models will not. About $60. I have two of them in my recording rack.


Just an FYI that we just discovered (the hard way, they actually caused problems on an install).  Shure has an additional list of disqualified switches beyond the list at Audinate's site.

Directly from the Shure site;
"All ProSafe unmanaged switches, including but not limited to:
FS105, 108, 108P, 116, and 116P
JFS516, 524
GS105, 108, 110, 116, MX, E and PE models
JGS516, 524, E and PE models
GSS108, 116, E and EPP models
GS and FS305, 308, 316, 324, 605NA, 750E"

Lee

 22 
 on: Today at 06:03:09 pm 
Started by jamie ashton - Last post by Alex Pregel
It looks like a polarity or timing issue (very unlucky mic placement). On the data sheet for your speakers, there is a passive crossover at 7kHz, right around where the dip is. It could also just be an unlucky microphone position where those two drivers have phase issues at 7kHz. When you move the mic a little bit does the dip move? If it does, it's the timing/phase cancelation. If not, it's probably a polarity issue with the HF driver. (My bet is a polarity issue)

Hoping someone with more knowledge than myself could take a look at a measurement I have recently made with my mid tops please.
They are tannoy vnet 100s, powered with the linea research amps and dsp. Crossover points are 450hz dsp generated from dual 12s to 2" and 6.3k passive between 2" and 1". All wiring from amp to drivers is positive polarity and this has been confirmed to be correct by tannoy.
I noticed something lacking in the top end so decided to have a look. I'm not very experienced with smaart but competent enough to understand to an extent.
Attached is my response taken with program material with dual fft.
Measured in my local small to medium sized club, measurement mic approximately 1 metre from the cab between the horn and dual 12 section. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 23 
 on: Today at 05:52:28 pm 
Started by jamie ashton - Last post by jamie ashton
Hoping someone with more knowledge than myself could take a look at a measurement I have recently made with my mid tops please.
They are tannoy vnet 100s, powered with the linea research amps and dsp. Crossover points are 450hz dsp generated from dual 12s to 2" and 6.3k passive between 2" and 1". All wiring from amp to drivers is positive polarity and this has been confirmed to be correct by tannoy.
I noticed something lacking in the top end so decided to have a look. I'm not very experienced with smaart but competent enough to understand to an extent.
Attached is my response taken with program material with dual fft.
Measured in my local small to medium sized club, measurement mic approximately 1 metre from the cab between the horn and dual 12 section. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 24 
 on: Today at 05:48:47 pm 
Started by Jeremy Young - Last post by Jeremy Young
Tim, thank you for your wisdom.  I wanted to let your post sit with me for more than a day so I fully digested it before responding.  Sometimes the best answer is to the question you didn't ask.

I have no quarrels pretending to be a decorator if it helps me get a successful site visit ahead of preparing my bid, that's a great technique!

My main rig was always the goal, and by all accounts is quite portable and fits my needs well.  I wasn't looking for a magic bullet subwoofer, but if there was something out there for the low-frequencies that aligned with my buying strategy and long-term goals I thought it might be worth the investment.

Between this thread, some offline chats with other LABsters and some self-reflection, I think I'd be better off sticking to that "one good rig" approach and giving my clients the best service I can offer. 

Coming from a volume-sales universe in my day job (designing heating/cooling systems and selling the components to the installing contractors, rinse and repeat), offering tiered pricing of products to my customers after a mechanical system design means that the time designing might not be wasted if they buy one of the options, but if I offer only the most expensive I might not get an opportunity to show them the cheaper options I have and now that time is down the drain. 

In reflection, my personal business is quite different.  The product is the experience, the tools I use shouldn't require tiers based on client budget, but rather my professional opinion to decide what is best for the gig, and then price it based on time/materials.  If they can't afford it, there's no reason I should be storing/maintaining/pricing a whole other sound system that goes out at a lower cost, because that means my other rig isn't rented and the results are less impressive (both of which cost me money). 

To put it this way, if I hire a carpenter to build me a deck, would they price it with their best tools, with a cheaper option if he works with his rusty old tools?  Or a "deck in a day" price versus a "deck in a month" to save him hiring a helper or making trips to the hardware store in his hatchback?  Probably not.  And if he did, he would likely lose credibility with the more professionally geared clients.

I was trying to re-configure my racks this past weekend to suit a gig on Feb 2nd (sold out at 200 people, two live bands, 72'x47' room plus stage with 23' ceilings, and 11 stairs on the load-in/out).  It was a delicate balance between removing enough to make the racks lighter, and not being adequately prepared or having to patch a lot more on site than I'd like.  I'm going to instead hire a grunt helper to get me in with my gear-of-choice and move on. 

Then my new lights arrived and I started doing some tests, and my fiance asked if I'd be using them at this gig.  I replied "no, they only paid for my cheaper lights".  To which she asked "but will these ones look better?  Will your work improve because of bringing them?  Will it cost you money to leave them at home?".  I realized in that moment that I should be putting quality first, and let my reputation grow from there knowing that each time I put my name on a gig that it's another opportunity to make an impression and a lasting relationship.

To go full circle, I'll probably end up selling the ZXA5's and EAW sub, and adding more SM80's and Orbit Shifters to my inventory.  That way I can free up some capital and storage space while also allowing me to scale up for the gigs I'm actually trying to target (small concerts in the park, boutique production for bands playing larger rooms than their own equipment can cover, etc) and if I get myself into another load-in issue I'll price a helper.  I've already invested in myself (training, learning, experience) and premium gear, I'm just short-changing myself by working with my older stuff.

That D&B Y-rig looks sexy but I'm sure it would come at a cost (another year at the dayjob, or more) for what would only be marginally more portability.  These small events are certainly not a growth market for me, and if anything it puts me in direct competition with a larger pool of players that are already doing the highly-mobile somewhat-decent production game.  There's a time and a place for compact rigs, but rock and roll probably isn't one of them.

As for your story, I can completely relate.  Sometimes working by myself is fantastic (no one to blame patching mistakes for though), but all it takes is an injury, a tiny elevator or 30 stairs to ruin my mood.  I try not to let it turn me into a sour grape, but when it comes time to mix the event if I'm feeling my most creative and on top of my game I will give the best results, period.  Instead of spending so much time trying to find the right tool, I should be exploring options locally for the right helper to allow me to do my best work.

As always, thanks to everyone who offered ideas and suggestions.  This community is a fantastic resource and if any of you ever find yourselves in my neck of the woods don't hesitate to reach out so we can connect in person.

 25 
 on: Today at 05:39:32 pm 
Started by Tom Bourke - Last post by Bob Charest
One solution is to use a DC power distribution unit. I replaced all the wall warts on my Sennheiser gear by doing that. I just snipped the wall wart off and wired directly into the DC distribution unit. No weight, no worries. It was rocksolid from the day I installed it until the day I moved to different equipment


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 26 
 on: Today at 05:34:11 pm 
Started by Ben Petersen - Last post by Ben Petersen
Ben,

As another poster pointed out, the antennas you are using work in the VHF range, while your wireless systems operate in the UHF range. That is most likely your main issue.

 Also, in you last post you stated that you are using 100' of coax in a 100' room. I have a few questions, 1st, why do you need a 100' of cable, meaning where are the antennas located in relationship to the receiver and the stage? Are you using the correct type of coax? There are several specifications, I believe the type you need is 50 ohm RG8X/U, but you can call Shure and confirm.

Because you stated you needed a fast solution, I recommend putting the receivers on the stage using the original 1/4 wave whip antennas that came with the systems.

If you are still not satisfied with the results, call Shure and get the proper cable and active antennas tuned for your BLX wireless frequency range, keep your coax as short as possible (25' or less), make sure the gain on the active antennas are set for the corresponding cable length (3db for 25' of coax), and spread the active antennas at-least 6' apart.

Steve   

Steve,

Both the antennas and the receivers are located in the sound booth 100' away from the stage. Thank you for your suggestion to move the receivers onto the stage. That would be my first choice, though the choreography and stage settings in the production (Beauty and the Beast) would make finding a spot for it a little difficult.

I will call Shure and see if there are any equipment flaws that I can sort out with them. Thank you again for your help.

 27 
 on: Today at 04:55:57 pm 
Started by Tom Bourke - Last post by Thomas Dameron
In the very compact switch category, I'm a big fan of the NetGear GS108T. It's a small 8 port managed switch that will allow you to disable the EEE features, which their other Prosafe models will not. About $60. I have two of them in my recording rack.

But the fact of the matter is that just about any gigabit ethernet switch will work if you are not running a mixed network. I.e. not running video, or other internet traffic, print servers, etc... on the same network. An unmanaged switch used exclusively for Dante will work fine also (as long as you can disable the EEE/powersaving/Green ethernet features.)

I agree that the GS108T is a great little switch.  I keep a pair in my pelican.  However, I've started to migrate them to GS110TPv2, the POE version.  It's slightly larger but can power Avio and similar adapters. 

What I've learned with the Netgear lines is that the Smart Managed Plus products are no bueno with Dante, but the Smart Managed Pro products are good to go.  One other note is that it's nice that they ship with the EEE off, so for Dante only, unicast networks there is zero configuration needed.

thomas d.

 28 
 on: Today at 04:46:51 pm 
Started by Dan Courtney - Last post by Kevin Maxwell
You could try using those mounts on the wall to the left and right of the stage area. I would put them to the outside of the beam I see in the picture. But first play something thru the speakers that you have and get relatively close to them and see how they sound to you. Are they worth using in a different location? They are not high quality speakers.

I would prefer to mount some good speakers (that have built in hang points on them) from the beams getting them into the seating area a little bit and aiming them down. The mounts that you have wouldn’t allow for mounting them on the beams. You also have to be sure that the structure that you are mounting the speakers to can take the weight and can be mounted properly. Properly mounting speakers is a long thread in and of itself.

Acoustic treatment done right can help in a lot of rooms. The done right part is the important part. If done wrong you could change the sound of the room for the worse. If you get carried away and do too much you will make it a dead room and that can be as bad or worse than a lively room. For this application I think we understand what you are looking for. The one thing that people have a tendency to forget is in a church with congregational singing you need to be careful to keep it lively enough so their singing doesn’t get absorbed too much.

 29 
 on: Today at 04:30:30 pm 
Started by Tom Bourke - Last post by Scott Helmke

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BGSWWG2/ref=dp_cerb_1

Not sure I'd recommend an LED driver - those are designed to be constant current, and can be a bit variable in actual voltage depending on the load.

 30 
 on: Today at 04:13:41 pm 
Started by Nathan Morefield - Last post by Travis_Valois
FWIW, you wouldn't necessarily end up paying 6x the day rate for a 6 day tour - many rental houses have a price break where a week may be the equivalent of just 3 or 4 days rent. Definitely inquire before deciding that you still want to buy.
HTH,
David.
+1

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