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Church and H.O.W. Forums for HOW Sound and AV - Your Displayed Name Must Be Your Real Full Name To Post In The Church and HOW Forums => Church Sound Archive => Topic started by: lorenjones on January 14, 2011, 12:05:40 am

Title: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: lorenjones on January 14, 2011, 12:05:40 am
So our pastor just told me the church has decided to invest in a musician mix their own monitoring system.  Currently we mix for the band (everyone on headphones) from a dedicated Soundcraft SM20 monitor desk.

Can anyone here compare the MyMix system vs Aviom?  I am currently favoring the MyMix as it will be quite a bit cheaper to configure a system that will carry all 48 channels to match the frame size of our mixing desk.  I realize either system only allows the musician to select 16 channels to include in their mix.  Any drawbacks with the MyMix system that any users here have noticed?  We are going to audition the MyMix in the next couple weeks but just wanted to see what opinions were on it vs Aviom.

A related question regarding IEM's.  Currently our band members use cheap (read iPod earbuds and other garbage earphones) as "IEM's".  I would like to include the purchase of some decent universal fit IEM's to go with our new monitor mixing system.  I have been looking at Westone UM1 or Etymotic ER6i.  Any opinions on these?  Suggestions for other good universal fit entry level IEM's?  I think durability, secure fit and easy availability of affordable replacement foam or silicone tips will be more important than absolute sound quality.  

Thanks for any thoughts,
Loren Jones
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Lee Buckalew on January 14, 2011, 09:14:28 am
Loren,
If you are still weighing budget vs. functionality.  Check out the Roland M-48 system.  It allows each musician to have a different set of 40 inputs applied to 16 stereo groups on his/her own mixer.
Very flexible.

I canot speak to MyMix having not used it but it does create the same issue that Aviom has and that is, all musicians must be sent the same sets of feeds even if they don't need them.

His,
Lee Buckalew
Pro Sound Advice, Inc.
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Arnold B. Krueger on January 14, 2011, 09:32:45 am
lorenjones wrote on Fri, 14 January 2011 05:05

So our pastor just told me the church has decided to invest in a musician mix their own monitoring system.  Currently we mix for the band (everyone on headphones) from a dedicated Soundcraft SM20 monitor desk.

Can anyone here compare the MyMix system vs Aviom?



We've had Aviom for about 6 months, and I can read spec sheets.

My first 2 concerns are:

(1) The controller seems to require thrashing through menus to get common operations completed. Learhing curve?

(2) No digital interface with digital consoles.

To give the devil its due, the Backbeat hardware looks like its about 10 years of development down the road from our Aviom system in just about every way. I chafe at the costs and limitations of the Aviom concentrators.


Quote:


 I am currently favoring the MyMix as it will be quite a bit cheaper to configure a system that will carry all 48 channels to match the frame size of our mixing desk.



IOW you want it to also be a digital snake?


Quote:


A related question regarding IEM's.  Currently our band members use cheap (read iPod earbuds and other garbage earphones) as "IEM's".  I would like to include the purchase of some decent universal fit IEM's to go with our new monitor mixing system.  I have been looking at Westone UM1 or Etymotic ER6i.  Any opinions on these?  Suggestions for other good universal fit entry level IEM's?  I think durability, secure fit and easy availability of affordable replacement foam or silicone tips will be more important than absolute sound quality.  



One word: Shure.

BTW I picked up a pair of Altec "Backbeat Pro" IEMs for about $30 off the web. Their physical and sonic resemblence to my Shure E-3 (AKA SE 210) IEMs (ca. $180) is pretty uncanny. A friend who dabbles in such stuff says things like "The same Knowles balanced armature driver". He used to be VP of R&D for you-konw-who and turned me onto this deal. I asked him about the need for multiway IEMs and he says not so much.

Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Arnold B. Krueger on January 14, 2011, 09:34:57 am
Lee Buckalew wrote on Fri, 14 January 2011 14:14


I canot speak to MyMix having not used it but it does create the same issue that Aviom has and that is, all musicians must be sent the same sets of feeds even if they don't need them.



Doesn't that come with the territory if you run all the remotes over the same CAT5 media?
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Lee Buckalew on January 14, 2011, 12:09:30 pm
Quote:

Lee Buckalew wrote on Fri, 14 January 2011 14:14


I canot speak to MyMix having not used it but it does create the same issue that Aviom has and that is, all musicians must be sent the same sets of feeds even if they don't need them.


Arnold Krueger wrote:

Doesn't that come with the territory if you run all the remotes over the same CAT5 media?



No it doesn't.  With the REAC format (Roland) each mixer can be sent 16 stereo mixes made up of any combination of the 40 channels.
So one mixer may receive a different combination of channels than another.
It is a 40 x 32 matrix per personal mixer (well, actually 40 x 16 stereo).

His,
Lee Buckalew
Pro Sound Advice, Inc.
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: John M Gibby on January 14, 2011, 06:18:07 pm
Personally, I still think the Roland M-48 has everyone beat.  I do foresee touchscreen systems becoming popular, however, the one thing I have against them is the light produced from them when you want to be able to go black during a performance.  Plus there is something to be said for being able to put your fingers directly on the knob you need to turn and not having to page through touchscreen menus to get to it.

John
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Frank DeWitt on January 14, 2011, 07:35:50 pm
Two unrelated responses. Behringer just announced it's own Aviom like this week.
http://www.behringer.com/EN/Products/P16-M.aspx

I know nothing about it. just a heads up.

Second thought.  Is there a new mixer in your future?  if so, you may want to coordinate the two. It could save you some money, and might give a better solution.  Two boards I know of that work closely with IEM are  Roland, and SAC.  I am sure there are others.

BTW The SAC will allow the musician to have as many ch as you have (up to 72) (I am not sure that is a good idea)  You can give them as many or as few as you like.

Frank
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: lorenjones on January 14, 2011, 09:31:36 pm
Thanks Lee,

I may understand MyMix incorrectly but I think it is capable of sending all 48 channels from the direct outs of our FOH desk back to the stage via Cat5 cable then each mix station can pick any 16 of those 48 to create their mix.  Am I wrong in my understanding of the MyMix system?

I know the Roland system has remote control mic pres in their digital snake etc and better EQ in the mix stations and the ability to interface digitally with Roland digital mixing desks.  But the cost looks like it would be a lot higher.  I don't anticipate us going digital at FOH in the near future though and even if we did I would like to have the flexibility to not be tied to one manufacturer's desk because we already owned their digital snake.  I kind of like the look of i-Live.

I think Aviom can do the same thing but you have to get into the Pro-64 system to be able to do it.  Is that right?

thanks,
Loren Jones

Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: lorenjones on January 14, 2011, 09:49:47 pm
Quote:

We've had Aviom for about 6 months, and I can read spec sheets.

My first 2 concerns are:

(1) The controller seems to require thrashing through menus to get common operations completed. Learhing curve?

(2) No digital interface with digital consoles.

To give the devil its due, the Backbeat hardware looks like its about 10 years of development down the road from our Aviom system in just about every way. I chafe at the costs and limitations of the Aviom concentrators.


I'm not sure I know what you mean by Backbeat hardware.  Is that a reference to MyMix or something else I am not aware of.  I know nothing about the functionality of the user interface on MyMix but we are going to let our worship team put hands on an installed system at another local church to see what they think before making any decisions.  What are your main frustrations with the Aviom system?  As far as no digital interface with digital consoles that is certainly true.  It may change in the future.  We have a good quality analog desk now and I doubt we'll be switching to digital anytime soon.

Quote:


IOW you want it to also be a digital snake?



I don't really need a digital snake.  We already have copper snake installed to FOH and transformer isolated splits to the monitor desk location.  Adding any of these systems to an otherwise analog install is going to require some point where all the inputs are collected, converted to digital and sent out to the distrubutor and mix stations on Cat5.  I would probably locate that interface at FOH in our situation because we can just use the direct outs on our main desk as inputs into the analog to digital interface thus avoiding the need to buy more expensive analog to digital interfaces with built in mic preamps.  If I located the interface on stage or near it I would have to have mic preamps.

Thanks for the tip on the BackBeat Pros but it looks like they may not be easily available anymore.  One reason I have looked at the Etymotic and Westone is the availability of triple flange or dual flange silicone earpieces which I think are more secure and isolate better than the single flange while being easier to clean and maintain without need for frequent replacement that you would run into using foam earpieces.  I am concerned about secure fit.  I don't want them complaining that the things slide out and then they have no bass and no isolation from the noise on stage.

Thanks,
Loren Jones
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Lee Buckalew on January 15, 2011, 10:13:36 am
As far as MyMix goes, again, I have not used it.  
It appears that the basic system, connected by utilizing standard 100MBps network switches, is limited to 16 total channels on the network.
If you want more channels you can do that.  The limitation of channel count is not listed in the manual.  The requirements for networked channel counts above 16 are the need to use a managed switch that also has IGMP snooping.  If the system has to use more than 1 switch then the switch's have to have Gigabit uplink ports.  
All use also requires a dedicated network until AVB switches become available.
It also appears that the inputs to the system, and what monitor channel they appear on, are determined by the physical patch of the input and are then left up to programming each mixer to establish which 16 channels will be utilized by which mixer.
There is an 1/8" input for a local source such as a metronome.

As far as Aviom goes each system is limited to 16 channels since the mixers each only see the data connection as 16 inputs on one RJ45.  You could run more than one Aviom system in order to access additional channels but, each system would only have access to 16 channels.  Only one of the mixer types, the A16R, has a local input capability.  It requires a rack mounted main unit and a different wiring topology than the A16II.

With either MyMix or AVIOM each system only allows a single input to the system to feed a single monitor channel.  In order to achieve a sub mix you have to submix externally and feed this into the system as a single channel.

With the Roland system you can take 40 inputs and create 16 stereo (32 channel) inputs available at each mixer.  You can create sub groups and send different sources to different mixers.  A much more flexible system.
If you are not using Roland consoles far creating the matrix feeds (or even if you are) you utilize a connected computer to control audio assignments and store the system settings.  It is not required after set up until you need to make a change.

Both the MyMix and the Roland also offer a local mic, built into each mixer, so that each user can mix a local mic into their headphones or ear buds in order to hear ambient sound without adding a mic that then takes up one of your input channels.

That's probably enough of my ramblings on this for now.

His,
Lee Buckalew
Pro Sound Advice, Inc.
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Kent Thompson on January 15, 2011, 01:22:18 pm
Something else to consider is how each system is built. Bear in mind this was an equipment dealer saying this but, he said everything but the Roland would fall apart after being used on the road(the mymix was not included in his comments). Granted this will be non moving in a church setting but, reliability and durability should also play into your decision.

Second is how does each system compare sound wise.

If you are looking at an iLive. They do have digital interfaces for a few systems out there except mymix and the Roland (without adding a bunch of equipment). The mymix has no digital input possibilities that I can see correct me if I am wrong in this.

I noticed that this system only has inputs and no through so you will need a splitter or extra dedicated outputs to feed the mymix. It would be good to talk with someone in the company to see where they are heading with their products to see how they might play into future changes you have planned for you system.

They are using the new open standards audio networking protocol I noticed which means it could at a later time talk with other systems that adhere to this protocol. And take feeds from them? (ie audinate who also has promised to adhere to this protocol once finalized) something to ask anyways.
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Lee Buckalew on January 15, 2011, 02:27:08 pm
Kent,
If you are referring to me, I am not a dealer for anything.  My company provides design, consultation and training.  At times we also provide brokerage services.

As far as interfacing goes, the Roland does not require "A bunch of extra equipment", it can interface to any MADI interface via the S-MADI interface.  The I Live T can utilize the M-MADI as an output card.

AVIOM ca not take any connection type except A-Net.  They do make their own A to D converters to get into the A-Net format or you can utilize an A-Net card as an output from various digital mixers.  Perhaps this would also be "A bunch of extra equipment".

I do not know enough about MyMix to comment.  I did not see any notes about a direct digital input capability, only analogue.

His,
Lee Buckalew
Pro Sound Advice, Inc.
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: lorenjones on January 15, 2011, 08:15:34 pm
Lee,

Thanks for the "ramblings".  I am not a computer network savvy guy.  Even less so than I am a sound system savvy guy.  Anyway I looked some more at the MyMix website.  One of their sample configurations pretty much matches what I have in mind for us, but it does as you noted require a managed switch and 1gb connnection.  Is that still standard Cat5 cable?

index.php/fa/553/0/

The Roland system would be much more flexible I am sure.  It looks like that would easily run us around $20,000 or more for a system with 10 mix positions.  I think a MyMix system of the same general proportions would be around $10,000 probably.

We'll know more once we put hands on the MyMix install at a local church and talk through it with the local dealer (he also carries Aviom and Roland BTW).

Take care,
Loren Jones
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Frank DeWitt on January 15, 2011, 09:28:00 pm
lorenjones wrote on Sat, 15 January 2011 20:15

Lee,

The Roland system would be much more flexible I am sure.  It looks like that would easily run us around $20,000 or more for a system with 10 mix positions.  I think a MyMix system of the same general proportions would be around $10,000 probably.

We'll know more once we put hands on the MyMix install at a local church and talk through it with the local dealer (he also carries Aviom and Roland BTW).

Take care,
Loren Jones


Wow.  I am glad you have the money and it looks like a good system.  I thank God there are much less expensive personal monitor systems for churches with smaller budgets.

Frank
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Kent Thompson on January 15, 2011, 11:22:17 pm
Lee Buckalew wrote on Sat, 15 January 2011 14:27

Kent,
If you are referring to me, I am not a dealer for anything.  My company provides design, consultation and training.  At times we also provide brokerage services.

As far as interfacing goes, the Roland does not require "A bunch of extra equipment", it can interface to any MADI interface via the S-MADI interface.  The I Live T can utilize the M-MADI as an output card.

AVIOM ca not take any connection type except A-Net.  They do make their own A to D converters to get into the A-Net format or you can utilize an A-Net card as an output from various digital mixers.  Perhaps this would also be "A bunch of extra equipment".

I do not know enough about MyMix to comment.  I did not see any notes about a direct digital input capability, only analogue.

His,
Lee Buckalew
Pro Sound Advice, Inc.


No it was someone else from a different forums that's why I used the qualifier, and yes I forgot about the new madi interface for Roland. iLive has an A-Net card that includes the hearback connections and adat as well so its digital for both aviom and hearback.
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: lorenjones on January 16, 2011, 04:46:07 pm
Well I agree with you it is expensive. I would rather see if some professional training for our volunteer crew wouldn't solve the perceived problems and save a bunch of money. If we do go with mymix the sale if our current monitor desk should offset a majority of the cost.

Thanks,
Loren
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Lee Buckalew on January 16, 2011, 08:07:22 pm
It's still far less than 10 decent, let alone great, monitors, 10 good channels of amps, 10 channels of EQ (or speaker processing) and a monitor desk.

His,
Lee Buckalew
Pro Sound Advice, Inc.
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: lorenjones on January 16, 2011, 08:40:01 pm
That's for sure.  I hope our Soundcraft SM20 will sell for close to enough to cover the entire cost.  Just need to find the right buyer I guess.
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Timothy C. Lee on January 18, 2011, 07:23:32 pm
Just my 2 cents on the earbuds...I have always considered earbuds to be something the musician should buy.  The idea of people sharing things put in their ears is a bit weird for my taste.  Just as a guitar player buys strings for their guitar, a player should invest in their own IEM earbuds.  It might be hard for a church musician to fork over for a good IEM system, but they can at least budget for a good set of earbuds.  This way they will most likely take more care of them as well.  Every church I've been in has a pile of broken headphones...I would assume there is also a small pile of broken earbuds as well.

Tim
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Josh Bartunek on January 19, 2011, 08:25:07 am
Hi everyone,
I just wanted to make myself available for any questions regarding the myMix system. More specifically, I want to clear up any misunderstanding regarding functionality. Like a lot of networked systems, channels on a myMix system travel in pairs. Those pairs can be configured as dual mono or stereo. The number of channel pairs available on a myMix system is theoretically equivalent to the number of multi-cast groups the Ethernet switch can handle. The Cisco switches that we advocate can handle 256 groups. We haven't tested 256, however, we have tested up to 40 pairs on the network with no problems. You can mix 8 pairs on each myMix (configured as dual mono or stereo). The 8 pairs that one myMix selects on the network can be completely different from another myMix.
For instance, if you have 24 channels coming from the stage, you could have all of those as direct outputs from the console into two IEX-16L boxes. That leaves 8 more channels into which you could send 4 stereo submixes from FOH. Those could be drums, vocals, guitars, keyboards, etc. The drummer could select all of his drum mics, and grab vocal and guitar submixes. The vocalists could select the drum submixes and all of the vocal mics, etc.
We really designed the myMix system from the point of view of musicians - names not numbers, intuitive user interface, multi-track recording to SD card. In my very humble opinion, other systems on the market were designed by engineers for engineers. One of the first compliments we get on our system is that musicians can easily begin using it in a matter of minutes. That is key to keeping them in the creative state of mind (which is where they are most comfortable). After all, if it wasn't for musicians none of the engineers in this business would have a job. Somehow, somewhere, musicians became the problem when in reality they are the sole reason for the our existence. But I digress...
Please let me know if anyone has questions.

Josh Bartunek
Movek LLC
www.mymixaudio.com
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Lee Buckalew on January 19, 2011, 08:41:35 am
Josh,
Please read the rules and change to using your real full name when posting.
The moderator will be by soon to lock the thread and make the same request I'm sure.

Thanks,
Lee Buckalew
Pro Sound Advice, Inc.
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Josh Bartunek on January 19, 2011, 09:56:50 am
OK. Should be changed. Thanks for the advice!
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: lorenjones on January 19, 2011, 11:21:54 pm
Thanks for the info Josh,

Just wondering re: the 8 stereo or dual mono pairs.  If configured for dual mono can each of the channels of the dual mono be adjusted individually so in effect you can have 16 fully adjustable mono channels?

We are waiting on a hands on demo which should help us get a good idea about the system.

Thanks,
Loren Jones
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Josh Bartunek on January 20, 2011, 06:47:38 am
Hi Loren,
Yes, if you configure the pair as dual mono the two channels appear as separately named, pan-able, mix-able channels. They just happen to travel together on the network infrastructure. You could even choose not to see one member of the pair on the main mix screen. Have you been contacted regarding the demo?
Josh
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: lorenjones on January 23, 2011, 08:05:18 am
So by way of sharing our thoughts I will post that we demoed a small MyMix setup installed at a local church's teen stage yesterday.  Three worship leaders from our church were there with me and the MyMix distributor/dealer was there.

The consensus from the musicians was that the system is easy to navigate, find what you need to find and adjust levels etc.  It seemed intuitive for them to use.  It has pan, level, effect level, and a tone control (low/high like on an old radio) per channel.  The main output EQ is 4 bands fully parametric with the option to make the hi and low bands shelving.  I agreed with the musicians that the user interface was quite simple to figure out.

I had thought that you could connect several together in daisy chain fashion to form a system without them having to be connected to an ethernet switch but apparently that isn't the case.

I think the MyMix has some advantages over the competition mainly the ability to select your 16 mix channels from a large number of choices (not sure the max number possible but it is in the hundreds).  With the standard Aviom Pro16 system you can't do that.  Also an advantage is the ability to use more than 8 MyMix stations on the network (as many as you want) which is also an advantage over Aviom.  The multitrack recording to SD card is a nice bonus.

With Aviom you know you are getting a product from a well established company that has been around for quite a few years so you don't have to worry to much about the company going under and you being left hi and dry if something breaks.

Anyway that's our take on it after an audition of the system.  Any other thoughts from you all are certainly appreciated but we are likely going to purchase this in the next week or two and I will report back with how it is working out for us.

Loren Jones
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Kevin Hoober on January 23, 2011, 10:24:30 pm
Hey Loren,

I've enjoyed following this thread for the little while.  I'm glad to see somebody giving Aviom a run for its money.  A few comments on your last post:

lorenjones wrote on Sun, 23 January 2011 07:05


I had thought that you could connect several together in daisy chain fashion to form a system without them having to be connected to an ethernet switch but apparently that isn't the case.


I take it that the system uses a POE switch?  Or does each mixer need a wall-wart?

lorenjones wrote on Sun, 23 January 2011 07:05

Also an advantage is the ability to use more than 8 MyMix stations on the network (as many as you want) which is also an advantage over Aviom.


How is this an advantage?  As far as I know, there is not a limitation to the number of Aviom Mixers in a system.  
(I'm not questioning the beauty of having assignable inputs on the mixers)

Keep the good info coming,
Kevin
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: lorenjones on January 23, 2011, 10:55:28 pm
Quote:

I take it that the system uses a POE switch? Or does each mixer need a wall-wart?


They can get power from either POE or wall warts.

Quote:

How is this an advantage? As far as I know, there is not a limitation to the number of Aviom Mixers in a system.
(I'm not questioning the beauty of having assignable inputs on the mixers)


It may be my misunderstanding of an Aviom system.  I thought they could only do 8 mixers per network but that may be just 8 mixers per A16D distributor and you can use multiple distributors if you want more mixers on the network.

I think having the large LCD screen with click-wheel interface and easy ability to label everything as you want it is quite nice on the mymix system.  I haven't looked at an Aviom system hands on.  It just seems like the ability to select from more than 16 channels to make the mix each person wants is nice, although I guess most of the time each person will want most of the same inputs included in their mix.  If that number exceeds 16 then we will most likely have to make some of it happen with submixes sent to the mymix system anyway.

Take care,
Loren Jones
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: John M Gibby on January 24, 2011, 09:40:09 am
What is the setup like for the MyMix stations.  Does each station have to go through the list of possible inputs and pare it down to 16?  For a fixed installation I can see that this is a mostly one time setup per station.  However, I think it gives the user the ability to screw up their mix.  It seems that a lot of amateur musicians think they need everything in their mix and want a mix that is like the house mix.  Those that know what they are doing will ask for only what they need in their mix.

While the MyMix does seem intriguing to me, I'm still in the Roland M-48 camp.  Plus, I still don't like the big LCD screens on onstage equipment in a setting where going to black is a requirement at times.  The proliferation of onstage LEDs and lights drives me crazy and detracts from the mood of the performance.  I know people are becoming more accustomed to it, but I still think that LCDs will even more distracting that little LED lights.

The Roland has a better set of features in my book.  And the system operator can set up each station by copying another station setup.  Additionally, they can pool inputs on one station group.  The only thing the MyMix has that the M-48 doesn't is the recording to SD Card, but they do have a record out.  

Regardless, competition is GOOD!
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Kevin Hoober on January 24, 2011, 10:59:56 pm
lorenjones wrote on Sun, 23 January 2011 21:55

It may be my misunderstanding of an Aviom system.  I thought they could only do 8 mixers per network but that may be just 8 mixers per A16D distributor and you can use multiple distributors if you want more mixers on the network.


you can also daisy-chain mixers (of course, you get to use wall-warts)

lorenjones wrote on Sun, 23 January 2011 21:55

It just seems like the ability to select from more than 16 channels to make the mix each person wants is nice, although I guess most of the time each person will want most of the same inputs included in their mix.


Usually 16 channels proves to be enough for the band guys--I wish for more channels when I need to add singers to the mix.  The only solution here w/ Aviom would be to use two systems--which can get messy.  Our current solution is Aviom for the band and individual stereo mixes (off of our SM20--I'm also interested in how you do in selling yours) for the singers.

Noticed an article in January's Live Sound International on this very subject, but it isn't intended to highlight the differences between the systems.


keep it coming,

Kevin H.
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Kent Thompson on January 25, 2011, 12:31:18 am
How is the build?
Title: Re: MyMix vs Aviom
Post by: Josh Bartunek on January 30, 2011, 08:32:55 am
John M Gibby wrote on Mon, 24 January 2011 08:40

What is the setup like for the MyMix stations.  Does each station have to go through the list of possible inputs and pare it down to 16?  For a fixed installation I can see that this is a mostly one time setup per station.  However, I think it gives the user the ability to screw up their mix.  It seems that a lot of amateur musicians think they need everything in their mix and want a mix that is like the house mix.  Those that know what they are doing will ask for only what they need in their mix.

While the MyMix does seem intriguing to me, I'm still in the Roland M-48 camp.  Plus, I still don't like the big LCD screens on onstage equipment in a setting where going to black is a requirement at times.  The proliferation of onstage LEDs and lights drives me crazy and detracts from the mood of the performance.  I know people are becoming more accustomed to it, but I still think that LCDs will even more distracting that little LED lights.

The Roland has a better set of features in my book.  And the system operator can set up each station by copying another station setup.  Additionally, they can pool inputs on one station group.  The only thing the MyMix has that the M-48 doesn't is the recording to SD Card, but they do have a record out.  

Regardless, competition is GOOD!


Currently, you would go through each myMix and setup the channels it receives. Each myMix has up to 20 name-able profiles. The myMix LCD is 4.5 inches diagonal, so I wouldn't call it big. We have had requests for a firmware update that allows the screen to blackout after a user specified period of time. That will be in a future firmware update. Actually, we are working on lots of firmware updates as requests come in from end-users. The ability to store profiles on the SD card and transfer it to other units has been a popular request, as well as the ability to lock out the entire Settings menu, or individual menus a la carte. My feeling, albeit biased, is that our ability to constantly be reacting to the needs and requests of the users with firmware updates is a major advantage of our system. Smile