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 91 
 on: July 14, 2018, 10:11:32 pm 
Started by Justice C. Bigler - Last post by Tim McCulloch
Well, I'm finally moving on from my current/former job. Put in my two weeks notice on Friday, and then took two weeks vacation.


Now I'm looking for something better, which shouldn't be too hard since the bar isn't too high right now.


And still that barbecue trailer sounds fun.

Good luck in whatever you choose, Justice!

 92 
 on: July 14, 2018, 10:02:59 pm 
Started by Justice C. Bigler - Last post by Luke Geis
If you own equipment, you can make it move. Best of luck. The market is really good right now.

 93 
 on: July 14, 2018, 09:56:48 pm 
Started by Jeff Bankston - Last post by Luke Geis
There are a lot of build procedures I did that go against best practices. The resistors and caps should all have a little swoop in each lead for expansion and contraction and that isn't even the worst of it. The Heater wires should be laid in to come down over the top more like Bob's leads do in his build. Despite not going with what is considered " best practices ", this thing is dead quiet and it doesn't get hot enough to really be of concern for extraction and contraction.

Looking at many of the Hiwatt amps as an example, he went against best practices a lot, but made the cleanest looking amps there are. What has been found, and believe me I studied a bit on this, is that as long as the lead dress and component layout is clean and to some sort of standard, problems are usually sparse. In my case I have proper grounding, and my lead dress is pretty good. I have the noisy stuff tucked away in the corners and coiled tightly, the output transformer leads are braided and laid to go perpendicular to as many other components as possible. Along with that all my leads are essentially 90* perpendicular to others, or laid in nice clean lines.

My gripe with this particular kit was the width of the turrets. They were a little far apart and as can be seen, I had to shortcut a few components. Doing a proper relief on most of the parts would have been impossible as the leads were only just long enough to span the board. As much as I would love to do a military grade build, it also isn't as clean looking as people who spend $2,000 plus on these things want them to be. The majority of turret and eyelet board builds are running the leads as straight and geometrically as can be it seems. It looks better and doesn't appear to be problematic. I have no backwraps in my build and spent a great deal of time forging what was essentially a custom layout into a fairly small chassis. What I can say from my limited experience, is that it is not as easy as it seems to build an amp that follows all the best practices and looks like a million bucks too.


 94 
 on: July 14, 2018, 09:56:26 pm 
Started by Justice C. Bigler - Last post by Justice C. Bigler
Well, I'm finally moving on from my current/former job. Put in my two weeks notice on Friday, and then took two weeks vacation.


Now I'm looking for something better, which shouldn't be too hard since the bar isn't too high right now.


And still that barbecue trailer sounds fun.

 95 
 on: July 14, 2018, 09:30:39 pm 
Started by Jeff Bankston - Last post by Jeff Bankston
Back in the early 80s, a friend of mine drove 3 hours and bought a Major for $100.

He said they would have given it to him, if he would have stayed and gotten stoned and jammed with them.  He was not into drugs, so paid the money and left.

I wonder if he still has it.
A lot of Tascam and Otari professional reel to reels were given away and taken to the trash bin when digital took over. Some of those reel to reel are fetching upwards of  $1000.00+. A friend is collecting the old Sears Silvertone tube amps made by Dan Electro.

 96 
 on: July 14, 2018, 09:25:44 pm 
Started by Stephen Swaffer - Last post by Stephen Swaffer
I have a couple of Countryman E6s & dPA fine's at my disposal.  OP was not about how to get good hands free sound.

Frankly, I was curious if mic element size played a role-perhaps affecting my choice or decision to try a different lavalier.

There are those in our "circle" that are opposed to headset/ earworn mics- many opposed lavaliers a couple decades ago.  Admittedly irrational- but a product of some who allowed technology to change them.  This was a unique situation where a physical impediment made a handheld impractical- at the same time making it awkward for someone unfamiliar or uncomfortable with a earworn mic to be introduced to one.

In this application, seeing the lavalier is imaterial.  if a larger lavalier can-because of the physics involved- perform better, then I would like to pursue that option.

 97 
 on: July 14, 2018, 09:25:31 pm 
Started by Dustin Campbell - Last post by Mike Monte
  One thing, they are probably the hottest DI I've worked with.  Approach gain with caution.
frank
That's why I used it only once....  me: muted the channel, wired it up...signal was clipping the input....engaged the channel pad...all ok....me: "why bother"....?
 

 98 
 on: July 14, 2018, 08:50:23 pm 
Started by Jeff Bankston - Last post by Ivan Beaver
I decided to go for broke and buy it while it was for sale. I just bought a 1970 Marshall Major head for $2345.00 off epay. I always liked Blackmores geetar tone. Blackmores majors had a gain stage added. There are 2 more Majors on epaythemrealgood for $3295.00 + $299.00 shipping from Europe and another for $5500.00 + $165.00 shipping from Sandy Eggo Ca. I would never eat a sandy Eggo. I will be sleeping in a cardboard box soon. So much for saving for Firestone retirement.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/263765261382


http://www.ebay.com/itm/173383036632


https://www.ebay.com/itm/253738041110
Back in the early 80s, a friend of mine drove 3 hours and bought a Major for $100.

He said they would have given it to him, if he would have stayed and gotten stoned and jammed with them.  He was not into drugs, so paid the money and left.

I wonder if he still has it.

 99 
 on: July 14, 2018, 07:49:01 pm 
Started by Jeff Bankston - Last post by Stephen Kirby
Here is the 18 watt TMB Marshall clone I built! Not quite done with it in this shot. Was waiting on a couple more parts.
Why do people hang parts in these things with no strain relief?  Particularly when they're in love with carbon comp resistors?  Martin Marrietta figured out all this stuff in the '50s.  At least this doesn't have any backwraps, which I've seen in "boutique" amp builds on line.

 100 
 on: July 14, 2018, 06:50:13 pm 
Started by Jeff Bankston - Last post by Luke Geis
http://www.kbapps.com/audio/schematics/tubeamps/fender/princetonreverbb1270.php

It's another schematic for the same amp that use AA1164 and AA764 schematic nomenclature. The AA764 uses a GZ34 while the other schematics call for a 5U4. The AB1270 is the same as the B1270 and are CBS era amps as is the AA764.

The B1270 / AB1270 is the same between both the silverface and blackface models. The B1270 is as far as I can tell, nearly identical to the AA1164 with the exception of a couple small tweaks like a 2000pf cap on the reverb return and bigger capacitors on the tremolo power supply.

When I think of Princetons with reverb and tremolo, I think of the B1270. Mostly because it is both CBS and transition years related, and was the same in both the silverface and blackface models. I guess the AA1164 would likely be the one people gravitate towards because it was pre CBS.

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