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 1 
 on: Today at 03:45:01 pm 
Started by Nathan Riddle - Last post by Nathan Riddle
I hate the trade show USB give aways.

I was thinking 8GB drives to be more useful, but its rather expensive and you make good points. I'm re-thinking this.

Swag Sharpies always seem to make techs smile.

Sharpies/Pens might be a better idea. I love my Shure & EAW & Danley pens/sharpies, better pens than I usually buy...

If you're going to spend time in a booth, get a comfy pad to stand on.  Many hours on concrete will do in your feet and back.  Bring a bar stool or two with a back.
Often, anything you can't hand carry in, the venue will charge you for their burly boys bringing it in.

This is genius, thanks!

- If you are teaching a class, then establishing yourself as an authority on the topic(s) being covered is important. Otherwise, people may not respect what you have to say. Giving background on yourself and your company is part of that process. I wouldn't call that a "sales pitch," so I think you're safe on that point!

That's what I was imagining in the introduction/about me part of the class. I just don't want to dwell on it.

- Re: collecting information for a giveaway or whatever- be very respectful with the attendee's information. Few things bother me more than signing up for a giveaway and finding a week later I've been added to that company's email marketing list. Be very clear as to what you are going to do with the information you gather. Personally, I think the proper procedure (when you obtain someone's email address in this manner) is to send //one// email post show, i.e. "Thanks for coming to my presentation! If you have any further questions about the topics we discussed, I would be happy to help in any way I can." Then, the ball is in their court to reach back out to you should they choose.

If you have an email marketing list, in this ONE post-conference email to the attendees, you can include "If you'd like to get more information regularly, I have this list you can sign up for. It comes out (frequency of emails) and is a great resource for you to follow the trends of the market, as well as stay in touch with what we're up to!" and then provide a subscribe link. By letting the user know how often the emails are sent out, they can make an informed decision as to whether or not it'll be too frequent for their preference. Remember, it only takes ONE complaint for Constant Contact, MailChimp, etc, to investigate your account, and their terms of service require (CC) or strongly recommend (MC) that you only have subscribers who have specifically opted in to receive your email marketing materials.

Good points, I'm not really at the point to have an email marketing list or email more people. I think I'll probably skip trying to get people's info.  I like your below method more/better.

- Networking in general: People LOVE to talk about themselves. Make a mental note to ask more questions of the other person, as opposed to just starting into your personal sales pitch. "How long have you been an AV tech at your church?" "What's a fun show you did recently?" "How does it sound?" "What console are you mixing on?" (Followup, if you know the board, "How do you like (feature)?" If they don't know about this cool feature, now you've got an in to teach them something new while subtly establishing yourself as an expert.) In short, always have a good followup question to any of your initial questions-- this builds a conversation and adds to the rapport that you are establishing.

- Ask the other person for a card, as opposed to being all "here's my card." Gives them the opportunity to ask for your card, and in general indicates that you're more interested in getting to know them and their venue/company instead of wanting them to know about you. It's sneaky, but again, creates this unconscious thought in their mind that you're not trying to aggressively sell them anything.

-Ray

Oh this is exactly what I needed. Extremely practical, KISS statements/questions to get/keep the ball rolling and making them feel awesome and like I care (cuz I do).

As always, Ray, well thought out. Thanks!

It doesn't have to be a negative experience and you're not pitching to a captive audience of 1 person.

The point is to reduce whatever info into 30 seconds or less.  Become an economizer with words.

I stand corrected. Elevator speech it is, then asking them about themselves ;)

 2 
 on: Today at 03:26:41 pm 
Started by Rob Enders - Last post by Nathan Riddle
Also considering the Jands Stage CL console ($2000CAD).  I need to keep the show operation as simple as pressing one button to change the scene. This unit looks promising.

I have and love Jands, though I'd suggest getting Vista, not the CL and running it off of a computer with an Art-Net (or sACN) dongle for DMX connectivity.

You don't absolutely need a console to program/run a show, it can all be done from the computer.

The software is free to download and try. Give it a whirl.

---

The rest, I wouldn't have more to say than the others.

S4's on the front and some cheaper* (within reason) RGBWA+UV lights for CYC & adding color on the overhead battens.

S4 Pars/Parnels on the battens for overhead white/colored (high CRI) on the battens.

You should be able to do that reasonably well within 10k.

Talk to a dealer on the forums (Mike Pyle, amongst others) for some good pricing on equipment (unless you have a local company you know/trust, then go through them).

 3 
 on: Today at 02:58:45 pm 
Started by Fred Dorado - Last post by TJ (Tom) Cornish
A couple things -

I an thinking SQ5 because I really liked the GLD80 I put in my old church, and thought SQ5 would be similar and an upgrade from the QU series - Yes the A&H DBX168 stagebox

TJ - thanks for the link, I will read through it.

You are right, in ears would be easiest, but apparently they tried previously in the main building without success, and I am worried about the history, making the move etc and trying to make it as easy as possible on musicians.

the band is very different now and our worship leader has used them before, so it is a possibility.

I also saw Bose has some new small monitors that can run on battery or plug in. This might be an option.

As Dave said, floor wedges may be a bit much. We had 4 before and did ok, thinking more we have, less we have to have in each one and lower overall volume.
One way of addressing in-ear-itis is to schedule a long tech rehearsal day to work through in-ear issues.  There's no doubt that it's an adjustment, but IMO now is a great time to try to tackle this, since you have other changes going on, and you can make the case for why they would be helpful now - less gear to lug, greatly reduced stage volume in the new room, etc.

Coaching them on how to communicate what they need may help a lot, too, as well as soloing their mixes to see what's going on.  I've found that even learning what to ask for in the in-ear mix is a skill that has to be learned.  Make sure people have musician-style isolating buds and not the typical iPhone-style buds.  That makes all the difference.

Younger folks will likely be more open to this than older folks.  Good luck - it really is worth it from many angles.

 4 
 on: Today at 02:43:36 pm 
Started by Justice C. Bigler - Last post by Tim McCulloch
Who's been here long enough to remember the rants in the old LAB about the Roots basically destroying every rig they touched? Their soundman would push the system until the PA would literally destroy itself. I think they even had big body guards by the console to keep anyone from doing anything about it, IIRC.

When I first saw them on the TSSJF I couldn't believe this was the infamous "leave nothing but blown up gear behind" band. They seemed so decent on the show...

Wish the archives weren't broken (been that way for many months) so I could post a link to those threads. It was pretty horrifying what they were doing back then.

IIRC the FOH person was "Scientist" or something like that... and yes, he had both a reputation for destructive operation and a dismissive "you didn't bring enough PA" to go with the tour security that staff the mix position.

No idea what his real name was or if he's still in the industry or with Roots.

 5 
 on: Today at 02:39:01 pm 
Started by Justice C. Bigler - Last post by Andrew Broughton
Who's been here long enough to remember the rants in the old LAB about the Roots basically destroying every rig they touched? Their soundman would push the system until the PA would literally destroy itself. I think they even had big body guards by the console to keep anyone from doing anything about it, IIRC.

When I first saw them on the TSSJF I couldn't believe this was the infamous "leave nothing but blown up gear behind" band. They seemed so decent on the show...

Wish the archives weren't broken (been that way for many months) so I could post a link to those threads. It was pretty horrifying what they were doing back then.

 6 
 on: Today at 02:34:03 pm 
Started by Fred Dorado - Last post by Dave Pluke
He means the A&H stagebox: https://www.allen-heath.com/remote-audio-sq/

That makes a LOT more sense - thanks, TJ!

Dave

 7 
 on: Today at 02:17:26 pm 
Started by Fred Dorado - Last post by Fred Dorado
A couple things -

I an thinking SQ5 because I really liked the GLD80 I put in my old church, and thought SQ5 would be similar and an upgrade from the QU series - Yes the A&H DBX168 stagebox

TJ - thanks for the link, I will read through it.

You are right, in ears would be easiest, but apparently they tried previously in the main building without success, and I am worried about the history, making the move etc and trying to make it as easy as possible on musicians.

the band is very different now and our worship leader has used them before, so it is a possibility.

I also saw Bose has some new small monitors that can run on battery or plug in. This might be an option.

As Dave said, floor wedges may be a bit much. We had 4 before and did ok, thinking more we have, less we have to have in each one and lower overall volume.


 8 
 on: Today at 01:29:36 pm 
Started by Scott Olewiler - Last post by Scott Olewiler
I am retiring from my day job at the end of May and am going to have a lot of free time on my hands.  Looking to fill some of that up with some part time audio work.

If anyone has or might have a need in the future for occasional help within 100 miles of York Pa hit me up.  I am only 53 and am used to working 60-70 hours a week, not including my sound and band gigs so I'd be glad to fill a couple of days a week/month doing whatever needs. No job is beneath me, that's for sure.

PM me.

Bumping this post. My last day on my day job is 6/29.  Really like to get some additional weekday gigs with any local company as a sub contractor or occasional hired hand; last minute help, etc.  In spite of my well documented poor typing skills, I have a long history in a "must speak and act" professional corporate environment in a Fortune 100 company.

You will never be embarrassed by my appearance nor have to worry about me trying to steal your gigs.

 9 
 on: Today at 01:21:30 pm 
Started by Scott Holtzman - Last post by Rick Powell
Tim, you're now officially my hero.

Unfortunately, there's not much to gain by becoming such.

My son Ian (who runs our band's shows and also does some outside work) took a few music appreciation classes in junior college. He says they helped immensely in picking out individual sounds in a mix and knowing what music is supposed to sound like with balances, tones, etc. Plus, he's not really a player, although he does plunk around on guitar and piano where he has had some training, so he doesn't really favor instruments in his mix, and often tells dad to turn down the bass rig! There are people out there who seriously try to improve their craft, and hopefully result in compliments, return engagements and new clients. Being what it is, live music also attracts more than its share of people who mostly want the glory of the game, and not so much the art or the learning.

 10 
 on: Today at 01:18:34 pm 
Started by David Allred - Last post by Stephen Swaffer
You could probably take that part around to all of those stores and see what they have that might work, but for the $10 difference in price you could get the right part delivered. For $10 I wouldn't drive to Sears, or Lowes, or Bob's Hydraulic if I needed to fix a device that I make money with.

Mac

Several years ago someone on a different forum for electricians pointed out that if your hourly rate is $50 hour give or take your time is worth roughly a buck a minute.  How much (for that industry) do you actually save by buying at a big box vs supply house.  In my case, delivery was free-that adjusted a lot of my thought on pinching pennies on a money making venture.  But even here-if you spent 30 minutes trying to save $12 shipping, was it a wise move?

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