ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
 1 
 on: Today at 10:32:27 am 
Started by charles e strickland - Last post by Don T. Williams
Thanks for the reply.I was asking the amp question for sb1001, not the 2001. my stock is all KF and MA gear and yes I would be using a ux3600.  I use 9000i"s with my sb1000"s with nice H R  the spec"s on the 1001"s call for a little more gas. I know the 12000i would be a good match. was hoping that the 1000 w would be enough H R  if I went with the 9000i on the 1001"s Thanks, Charles.
Sorry for the confusion.  I was just trying to clarify that the sb2001, being a dual 21" sub, was not the same as the sb1001.  I should have left off the additional comment.  There are a lot of sb1000's and sb1001's out there, so I'll bet  some forum members have the experience with them that I don't have.

 2 
 on: Today at 09:53:30 am 
Started by Casey Sharp - Last post by TJ (Tom) Cornish
I need some help understanding how to make some calculations. Let me first explain my situation.  I occasionally do events in very small venues... like find some wall outlets and plug it in type of events.  I have an audio system in which the speakers alone have have a max amp draw of 5.2A, times 8 speakers is 41.6A. This doesn't include backline, rack gear, etc... Obviously, I can't run that all on a single circuit so many times I'm left running extensions from different circuits. Also obviously, ideally I could tie into a disconnect and use a power distro, but many times that just not an option... so.....

Here was my thought - I could power my system using a few step-up transformers, basically creating a more "power efficient" system.  I'm aiming at sub-15A per circuit, but here's where I'm not sure of my calculations.

To run each speaker at full power (624W) using 220V, my speakers would draw 2.84A meaning I could power up to 5 speakers per circuit as far as amp draw itself is concerned. The thing I'm wondering about is wattage because with a higher voltage means higher wattage. To power the 5 speakers on one circuit I would be generating 3120W.  But this is where I'm a little confused because this would all begin at a 120V outlet, but at 120V it would take 26A to generate 3120W.

Standard outlet - 120V x 15A = 1800W

So the conclusion I've came to is that I'm bound to the 1800W rating because that's what a 120V circuit is rated for.  Am I right?

So with stepping up to 220V, but being bound to 1800W will only leave me with about 8A to work with which leaves me exactly where I started because -

At 120V - 15A / 5.2A(per speaker) = 2.88 speakers per circuit AND

At 220V - 8A / 2.84A(per speaker) = 2.81 speakers per circuit




Is my logic and math right on this? Or have i completely missed something?

Thanks for your help!
There is no free lunch - stepping voltage up reduces the current after the transformer - trading lower current for higher voltage, however the current draw before the transformer will be the same as without the transformer, and actually slightly worse due to the power consumption of the transformer.

HOWEVER...

I highly doubt your speakers draw 5.2A.  Look in your speakers' spec sheets for the 1/8 power value - it will be more like 1 or 2 amps, not 5.  The reason for this is audio is a dynamic signal, and there may indeed be moments where you are putting out 600 watts into your drivers, but that is a small fraction of the time, which averages to a much lower number.

 3 
 on: Today at 09:51:06 am 
Started by Casey Sharp - Last post by Scott Helmke
Your math is correct. Ultimately what you're using is power, measured in watts.  The only thing you might gain with a higher voltage is less line loss on long cables.

The more interesting question is how much power your speakers are actually using, not their max rated number. If it's quiet acoustic music you're probably using a tiny fraction of what you think you're using.

 4 
 on: Today at 09:44:46 am 
Started by Mark Finnemore - Last post by Mark Finnemore
Okay now I'm just sad  :'(

 5 
 on: Today at 09:42:18 am 
Started by Casey Sharp - Last post by Nathan Riddle
You will also loose power through the conversion process(es).

What higher voltage does help with is long runs of cord via less voltage drop.

 6 
 on: Today at 09:34:56 am 
Started by Casey Sharp - Last post by Steve Crump
I need some help understanding how to make some calculations. Let me first explain my situation.  I occasionally do events in very small venues... like find some wall outlets and plug it in type of events.  I have an audio system in which the speakers alone have have a max amp draw of 5.2A, times 8 speakers is 41.6A. This doesn't include backline, rack gear, etc... Obviously, I can't run that all on a single circuit so many times I'm left running extensions from different circuits. Also obviously, ideally I could tie into a disconnect and use a power distro, but many times that just not an option... so.....

Here was my thought - I could power my system using a few step-up transformers, basically creating a more "power efficient" system.  I'm aiming at sub-15A per circuit, but here's where I'm not sure of my calculations.

To run each speaker at full power (624W) using 220V, my speakers would draw 2.84A meaning I could power up to 5 speakers per circuit as far as amp draw itself is concerned. The thing I'm wondering about is wattage because with a higher voltage means higher wattage. To power the 5 speakers on one circuit I would be generating 3120W.  But this is where I'm a little confused because this would all begin at a 120V outlet, but at 120V it would take 26A to generate 3120W.

Standard outlet - 120V x 15A = 1800W

So the conclusion I've came to is that I'm bound to the 1800W rating because that's what a 120V circuit is rated for.  Am I right?

So with stepping up to 220V, but being bound to 1800W will only leave me with about 8A to work with which leaves me exactly where I started because -

At 120V - 15A / 5.2A(per speaker) = 2.88 speakers per circuit AND

At 220V - 8A / 2.84A(per speaker) = 2.81 speakers per circuit




Is my logic and math right on this? Or have i completely missed something?

Thanks for your help!

If you are plugging in to a 120 volt receptacle rated at 15A, then you are correct, you are limited to that 1800VA. Boosting the voltage on the load side will not give you any additional power.

 7 
 on: Today at 09:24:03 am 
Started by charles e strickland - Last post by charles e strickland
Thanks for the reply.I was asking the amp question for sb1001, not the 2001. my stock is all KF and MA gear and yes I would be using a ux3600.  I use 9000i"s with my sb1000"s with nice H R  the spec"s on the 1001"s call for a little more gas. I know the 12000i would be a good match. was hoping that the 1000 w would be enough H R  if I went with the 9000i on the 1001"s Thanks, Charles.

 8 
 on: Today at 09:23:36 am 
Started by Mark Schneider - Last post by scottstephens
Mark,

  Lots of good comments here. But what Don said about how the drums are tuned is going to make the most difference.  The other day we were using 604's on a Yammy kit with the toms tuned high; think the Eagles sound. And I didn't really like the sound were we getting; I'm not sure why, maybe I was just having "one of those days". But we switched to EV 468's and the toms "opened up".  The Ev's are more sensitive and have top end than the 604's.
  So, play around with the kit and the mics. Is the D4 more or less sensitive than the D2? No one is going to gripe about all D4's or all D2's, ok, not usually. You have a neat opportunity here to play and learn.

Have fun.

Scott

 9 
 on: Today at 09:07:25 am 
Started by John L Nobile - Last post by Geert Friedhof
I have one of the Amphenol outs. Guessing no head amp control on the in's and obviously no phantom.

It's a digital distribution system, so the analog will be line level, where +18dBu (analog) equals 0dBfs (digital), same as desks and remote boxes. What goes in at one side comes out the same on the other side. Use the gain control and faders of your receiving mixer, or the output level control of your sending source to control the volume.

 10 
 on: Today at 09:00:24 am 
Started by Nathan Riddle - Last post by Nathan Riddle
Thanks Scott,

I think for budget sake I'll stick with the USG & Ubiquiti switch.

I'll definitely keep in mind a used IoS switch :) Love me some SecureCRT :P

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10

Page created in 0.024 seconds with 14 queries.