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 1 
 on: Today at 08:47:07 pm 
Started by Arik Perelman - Last post by Scott Holtzman
THANK YOU!!!

Please stop shouting (all caps)

 2 
 on: Today at 08:21:59 pm 
Started by Arik Perelman - Last post by Arik Perelman
Contact Jim Sawyer, hell know how to do it and if its out of your league you can send him the gear for service. 
http://sawyeraudio.com

THANK YOU!!!

 3 
 on: Today at 08:17:39 pm 
Started by Roberto Orozco - Last post by Roberto Orozco
hi, I hope somebody can help me with this issue. I recently bought an amplifier module for a pair of speaker cabinets I'm  building. the amplifier comes with DSP features, but is not programmed yet and I'm not sure how to do this. I contacted the manufacturer for help but they just sent me a link to download the software to adjust the different settings of the module. they told me is really easy!  it may be!  for somebody with the knowledge in the field.

I'm not a sound engineer, I been doing the sound with my band (small town band) for some years, we use an analogue mixer to connect all the signals, mixer to crossover, crossover to amps with no DSP, amps to speakers.
I been doing some research about this and looks like the DSP settings of an amplifier are base on the components that I'm going to be using in my cabinets and their specifications.

the amplifier has 3-channels
1500watts-low    500watts-mid    500watts-highs------at 8ohms
1800                  900                  900                 ------at 4ohms
RMS power.

the amp is to power 2 cabinets, each cabinet includes:

1 X 12'' subwoofer  550watts RMS  8ohms
1 X 6''   driver     100watts RMS   8ohms
1 X 1.75''  high frequency driver  100watts RMS  8ohms

if somebody could tell me how to setup the DSP features on the amplifier to use it with this speakers please!

I understand that to calculate the different settings, gain, limiters, crossover points, of the amplifier I need to know the specs of the speakers and the amp. I'll put the pictures attached with the information that the manufacturer gave me for the amp and the information I have from the speakers, I hope this helps.

I been trying to build my own speaker cabinets since long time ago, I hope I can find the help to complete my project  in this forum.

thank you so much for looking.     

 4 
 on: Today at 08:07:43 pm 
Started by Ken Webster - Last post by Mike Caldwell
This mic has a 4 pin connector in it's base to handle dual impedance.  You just wurn the plug around to engage the appropriate pins for the impedance you want.  The original cable connector was damaged and replaced 20 years ago with a single core cable and 1/4 inch TS plug.  This all appears to still be in good order with good electrical continuity.  As I said it is passing a signal which appears to be generated from the capsule (blowing breath into the screen).  It seems to me the capsule is responding to turbulence associated with breath but not to sound SPL.  I don't get how that is possible though.

Ken

A blast of breath blowing on to the mic capsule results in a large output from the mic, talking into the mic is much lower in level. That larger output level makes it through to some degree the bad section of the mic or the cable or the input that it is plugged into, have you tried it plugged into another channel on the mixer.

The mic capsule in a condenser mic does not output voltage as such, in a nut shell when it picks up sound but changes in it's capacitance and the voltage across the plates, the pre-amp in the mic takes that very high impedance signal from the mic capsule amplifies the signal and converts it to lower more usable impedance.

My guess would be it's the pre-amp section that is bad.

 5 
 on: Today at 07:38:00 pm 
Started by Steve Litscher - Last post by Tim Weaver
I bought a motorcycle gas tank on ebay a number of years ago. It was delivered by UPS, but when the guy rang my bell and handed me the package it was a gas tank that STILL HAD FUEL IN IT! To top it all off, the seller had wrapped it in a blanket and then shrinkwrapped it. Thats it. No box, no real packing, no nothing. By the time it got to me the tape was all falling off and it was a nasty, stinking, molotov cocktail looking for a spark!

So this is more about an idiot seller, but I still can't believe that UPS accepted this thing and shipped it across the country!

 6 
 on: Today at 07:34:32 pm 
Started by Rick Powell - Last post by Rick Powell
A friend in the Las Vegas NV area had two M32's stolen from storage.

Consoles serial numbers S1504636B31 and 1503062B31
Described as: They were stolen out of a trailer, broke into the side door from Life Storage 11330 Dean Martin Dr, Las Vegas, NV 89141 I believe sometime Monday 2/12/18

Contact Allan Barbish at (760) 953-7633 if you have any info.

 7 
 on: Today at 07:12:57 pm 
Started by Travis.Riddle - Last post by Art Welter
If you want a fairly high complexity build with much better performance in the same vein, there is a guy named Art Welter, who I assume is still around here, that has a re-entrant horn design.
Yeah Phil, still around here ;^). Hope all is well with you and yours!
Back when I was your age (and years younger...), a "re-entrant horn" was specifically (and only) used as a common name for a folded "PA" horn used for "speech" frequencies. A "re-entrant horn" typically used a thread-on compression driver, though later versions often built the compression driver in to the horn assembly itself.

My Keystone Sub design, which you are likely referencing above, is now commonly known as a Tapped Horn. The TH is a folded horn which has one side of the driver located near the throat and the other near the mouth, and has no sealed compression chamber.

This type of horn goes back at least as far as 1955 (William E.Glen "Acoustic Horn Assembly" patent #2,765,864) though the designation of "TH" was made by Tom Danley, who updated and began to commercialize the concept and then donated the LabSub FLH (folded Front Loaded Horn with sealed compression chamber) design here back around the turn of the century.

Cheers,
Art

 8 
 on: Today at 06:49:34 pm 
Started by Stephen Swaffer - Last post by Stephen Swaffer
I have 3 sets of speakers I need to have slaved-main, sidefill and overflow.  For various reasons, I need each on a separate mix-I would like to control our choir mics as a group, using group processing-but I would also like to have a group master that keeps the 3 sets of speakers tracking together.

So far, the only way I find to accomplish this is using a group and a DCA.  That is not the end of the world; however, at times it can defeat the advantage of a group if I am trying to mix the choir with either instruments, or occasionally we will have a group (more often a soloist-but that is obviously easier to mix).

What am I overlooking?

 9 
 on: Today at 06:48:51 pm 
Started by Ken Webster - Last post by Ken Webster
Are you using a 1/4 plug or an XLR connector with that mic?
Either way double check the cable.

I looked that mic up and to honest it may be time to put it on the shelf as a conversation piece!

What mixer are you plugging it into, does it have phantom power available?

What it this mic used for?

This mic has a 4 pin connector in it's base to handle dual impedance.  You just wurn the plug around to engage the appropriate pins for the impedance you want.  The original cable connector was damaged and replaced 20 years ago with a single core cable and 1/4 inch TS plug.  This all appears to still be in good order with good electrical continuity.  As I said it is passing a signal which appears to be generated from the capsule (blowing breath into the screen).  It seems to me the capsule is responding to turbulence associated with breath but not to sound SPL.  I don't get how that is possible though.

I have started disassembling the mic and testing internal wiring.  At the base plug, there are 4 pins in a square.  2 diagonally opposite pins are bridged earth shield zero ohms between them.  The other 2 pins appear to be from what I assume is an audio transformer windings and measure 45 ohms and 2 kohms to earth. So switching the plug around 180 degrees selects which of these impedances is used to tap signal.  Currently, the cable is bridged to tap both signal pins at the same time which is wrong as it defeats the impedance selectability of this plug.  However it has been working for many years so this is not the problem.

There are 2 wires running up the body to the capsule, one is earthed and there is 45 ohm to earth.  I assumed these are the other side of the transformer so should be isolated from the plug signal pins.  However, there doesn't appear to be any isolation so either there is no transformer or if there is, it may have shorted or I need to isolate the capsule from these measurements.  What do you think?

Ken

 10 
 on: Today at 06:23:58 pm 
Started by Ken Webster - Last post by Mike Caldwell
Are you using a 1/4 plug or an XLR connector with that mic?
Either way double check the cable.

I looked that mic up and to honest it may be time to put it on the shelf as a conversation piece!

What mixer are you plugging it into, does it have phantom power available?

What it this mic used for?

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