ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 10
 21 
 on: Today at 06:28:45 pm 
Started by Richard Turner - Last post by kel mcguire
From my own experience there are those clients that will constantly have "by the way"s on every event, some that don't really care about quality (just price), and some that are organized by too many planners. But, there are also aspects of these kinds of gigs that I've not addressed very well in the past too, in the advancing stage. I agree that if you're there, you should be ready for little things that pop up. If those kinds of things are so annoying as to make one want to charge more, not work for the client(s) or bring home angst on every gig, then something could be wrong with how you've advanced the gig, how you set up, and how you bill.

Knowing exactly who and what will be onstage before the job is important. Detailing out for the client what you're prepared to do, and what equipment you're planning on bringing…for what price, often heads off the surprises. If the client knows that there might be additional back-end charges for additional performers, extra fill speakers, lights, longer hours, etc, I've found they tend to nail down the needs fairly accurately all of a sudden. If they don't, then the door has been opened to adding onto your invoice. It's then a matter of can you pull it off...

Whether the gig is a one-man or 3-man gig also has to do with how well your equipment works together, how organized you are and how fast you are. And it has to do with how desperate you are for the job. If I needed a job and it was a two man gig, but the money was one man money, I'd have to decide whether I could get there early enough to be ready. The client wanting an earlier load in when you know it would take a couple hours less time means there is a "by the way" attached.  Beyond that, there's an assessment of whether I could handle the gig by myself once underway. Meals, bathroom breaks, or extreme hustling had to be factored in. Hope is never a good plan..

I'm confused about the "reinvesting in equipment": aspects of this?? Did you not have the equipment needed to do these jobs? Was the client always demanding things that were either not needed or aesthetic? ..."we need a line array" kind of requests?

 22 
 on: Today at 06:09:11 pm 
Started by Loren Miller - Last post by Scott Helmke
If you want to do a wide stereo bar on the cheap, those little thread adapters that come with microphones are 3/8"-16 on the inside. No fooling, that's the European standard, but it means that with a few of those adapters and some common hardware you can build anything you want.

Most of our antenna cables beyond a couple feet long are made with an RG-8X from "The Wireman" (part 118) along with their matching connectors.  The only trick, as usual, is buying the appropriate crimper.
https://www.thewireman.com/coax.html

 23 
 on: Today at 05:59:26 pm 
Started by kendallhadden - Last post by kel mcguire
I have a DXS12 and it's not a one note wonder.  It's a 6th order design with two differently tuned cavities.  I suspect the Q is not terribly high either.  I've not measured it but I can definitely follow pitch on the bass though it, which is hard to do with the high Q one note wonders.

The Yamaha DXS subs are pretty nice. The deals on the first gen DXS are hard to pass up right now if you need something to put under DXR10. I love my little K10.2 over DXS12 rig.

 24 
 on: Today at 05:54:49 pm 
Started by Dustin Campbell - Last post by Gary Weller
Slightly off topic, I lost the screw on the bottom of my Countryman 85 FET that holds it together. Does anyone know what size it is?

 25 
 on: Today at 05:47:49 pm 
Started by Robert Piascik - Last post by Mike Caldwell
My home network - 2 AP's 2 switches and a USG (behind my ISP's cable) is ALL Ubiquiti, but I've never seen the need for local Bar/Club/smaller Festival gigs to go beyond an external router and setup AP's AND a router. I've been using the Archer C7 for a couple of years now. Here's how I set it up:
  • 5G only,
  • don't hide the SSID,
  • WPA2 security (to prevent incidental access) and
  • I change the tx/rx settings to decrease the power.
  • DHCP allocation range is limited to 20 connections,
  • the console has a static IP outside the DHCP range, and
  • the routers default IP has the 3rd node changed so the client IP's are outside the default range.  Eg: 192.168.39.1.   

For most gigs, the router sits up on top of a fully extended mic stand (8ft?) behind the console with a single CAT5/6E cable connected to the console. I have a generic GC tablet holder as the router base and use a couple of short bungy cords to lock it to the holder.
I use a wifi scanner at each venue to determine 5G interference and will change the routers operating channels for both 2.4 and 5G if necessary to minimize clutter.
Never had an issue.
Did have a few dropouts, but determined that caused by my old Gen2 iPad, NOT the router interface. I upgraded to a Gen5 and added an Andy tablet and all works great.
FWIW - I have run QSC TM30, QU-24, X32, X32R and XR18 consoles remotely with this router.

I also have very good results with the TP Link Archer C7 and set it up just about like you do with the exception of hiding the SSID, limiting the DHCP range to only 8 (if needed that will allow room for most bands to log in and mix their own in ears using QU You.) I've experimented with using no security and feel I get slightly better connectivity to my QU Pac.

 26 
 on: Today at 05:41:41 pm 
Started by Chip Smith - Last post by Scott Holtzman
We are looking to replace our 40-channel Soundcraft Series Two mixer because it is 18 years old and it has some problems. I have been unable to find any new analog mixers that come close to what we have now, and I have several concerns about many of the digital mixers.  I have looked at the Soundcraft GB8 and the Allen & Heath GL2800, and both are a major step down from our Series Two, and I absolutely hate having buttons located between each fader. Are there any other analog mixers with 40 or more channels that i should consider?

My main concern with switching to a digital mixer is the lack of faders, and the steep learning curve for the team. The other members of my sound team are in their mid-60's to early 70's and they have all expressed concerns of being able to learn how to be effective on a digital mixer.  Working with layers and only having 24 faders to mix on the fly just won't work for us.  On a typical Sunday we use up 28 channels for the praise band, vocalists, choir, podium, lavaliers, etc., and for Christmas and Easter concerts we use a minimum of 32 channels.

I've been looking at the Allen & Heath Qu-32 Chrome and I like its similarity to analog mixers, although I wish it was offered in a 40 channel version. The recently released Allen & Heath SQ-7 has caught my eye. It seems to be the best fit for us in a digital mixer.  Has anyone had any experiences with the SQ-7 yet, or the smaller SQ-6 or SQ-5?  Are there any other digital mixers mixers with 32+1 faders at a similar price point as the SQ-7?  (Trying to keep it under $7,000)

Thanks in advance.

You could come close to a nice used CL-7-48 for that price.  It's really the only mixer that will give you the fader count you want and analog like workflows.

Even the 32 channel digital mixers you are still going to be dealing with layers to get to the group (matrix) masters and bus masters.


 27 
 on: Today at 05:33:00 pm 
Started by Chip Smith - Last post by Chip Smith
We are looking to replace our 40-channel Soundcraft Series Two mixer because it is 18 years old and it has some problems. I have been unable to find any new analog mixers that come close to what we have now, and I have several concerns about many of the digital mixers.  I have looked at the Soundcraft GB8 and the Allen & Heath GL2800, and both are a major step down from our Series Two, and I absolutely hate having buttons located between each fader. Are there any other analog mixers with 40 or more channels that i should consider?

My main concern with switching to a digital mixer is the lack of faders, and the steep learning curve for the team. The other members of my sound team are in their mid-60's to early 70's and they have all expressed concerns of being able to learn how to be effective on a digital mixer.  Working with layers and only having 24 faders to mix on the fly just won't work for us.  On a typical Sunday we use up 28 channels for the praise band, vocalists, choir, podium, lavaliers, etc., and for Christmas and Easter concerts we use a minimum of 32 channels.

I've been looking at the Allen & Heath Qu-32 Chrome and I like its similarity to analog mixers, although I wish it was offered in a 40 channel version. The recently released Allen & Heath SQ-7 has caught my eye. It seems to be the best fit for us in a digital mixer.  Has anyone had any experiences with the SQ-7 yet, or the smaller SQ-6 or SQ-5?  Are there any other digital mixers mixers with 32+1 faders at a similar price point as the SQ-7?  (Trying to keep it under $7,000)

Thanks in advance.


 28 
 on: Today at 05:13:04 pm 
Started by Robert Piascik - Last post by Stephen Kirby
A buddy of mine who plays a different lounge every night swears by the 1U Studiomaster mixers.  Racks it up with a 1U amp, tosses two or three 712Ms in his Golf and gets in and out of the gig quick.  Enough inputs for two or three singers, basic FX and good sound quality.

 29 
 on: Today at 05:01:33 pm 
Started by kendallhadden - Last post by Stephen Kirby
I would just go with the rcf offering, because it is frontloaded i.o. Bandpass. I think it will couple better with a 10". But maybe you should listen to them first.

Haven't heard the yamaha, but bandpass usually means one note wonder.
I have a DXS12 and it's not a one note wonder.  It's a 6th order design with two differently tuned cavities.  I suspect the Q is not terribly high either.  I've not measured it but I can definitely follow pitch on the bass though it, which is hard to do with the high Q one note wonders.

 30 
 on: Today at 04:53:20 pm 
Started by drew gandy - Last post by Stephen Kirby
For most cars the knee is around 35MPH.  That's what hyper-milers use.  Energy moving the weight and rolling resistance.  Above that aerodynamics come into play more heavily.  According to the built in realtime MPG meter my Subaru BRG doesn't change much from 55 to 80.  But my wife's is250 starts getting affected above 65 and noticeably so above 70.  I imagine my van is a logarithm from 55 upwards.

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 10

Page created in 0.035 seconds with 14 queries.