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 21 
 on: Yesterday at 11:08:42 pm 
Started by Jeff Bankston - Last post by Dennis Wiggins
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I was at the 2010 Vintage Hiwatt Convention where we had THREE original DR405's in the same room.  Actually, inches apart - and with original Jethro Tull bassist, the late great Glenn Cornick sitting on one (see pic).
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Hmm... white fiberglas tables. That must be a relatively recent picture.

-Dennis

 22 
 on: Yesterday at 10:54:30 pm 
Started by Wes Garland - Last post by Weogo Reed
Hi Wes,

A mic like the Rode NT4 would work nicely.
If mixing to mono, this would minimize multi-element phase issues.
Also, you get left/right level control.  For center control, you have to move the mic forward or back a bit.
Mics like this are very nice as a Drum overhead, and quite a few other applications, like
rotating it in the clip 90 degrees for close-micing a Clarinet going to wedges.

Olsen Windtech has the big furry windscreens, and Rycote.

Good health,  Weogo



Hey, folks!

I'm doing a local summer concert series and bumped into an act that I'm not sure how to reinforce. I usually do big band, rock, country, singer-songwriter, etc acts.

This is a trio, consisting of flute, bassoon, and clarinet.  They sit close together, facing inward at each other.  Bassoon in the middle/back, facing the audience.  The "room" is an outdoor gazebo built about a hundred years ago with an interesting roof shape...it sounds VERY good and projects quite well for what it is.

My instinct is to throw up a pair of mics in front of the group and 4' off the ground  (above the level of the flute tone hole -- maybe above the bassoon bell as well?). I suspect that close-mic'ing would be a mistake for this group, since they should be able to balance their mix on their own.

Next is the other issue - I own the usual dynamics, but my only condensers are pencils for drum overheads.  Should I be looking at picking up a pair of LDCs?   I could potentially budget, maybe 400 US for this..but I don't know if I'd ever use them again.

Maybe something like a pair of PGA27As?  (I stay away from the PG series for dynamics...same rule for condensers?) .... Rhode NT1s seem to be out of my budget... maybe AT2035s?

Or maybe I should use a pair of MD421s or e902s?  Is there are a reason folks are using LDCs in this application?

And where do I get dead cats for big mics like these?

 23 
 on: Yesterday at 10:42:05 pm 
Started by Robert Piascik - Last post by Tim McCulloch
Scott, about 5 years or so ago we made the decision that any track that is going to be played during a performance has to be transferred to our laptop or Mac Mini, whichever we have on site.  The reason is that we can control the track and know that it won't have problems.  We would never depend on a CD for a performance.  If the artist objects we let them verify we have removed it from our computer after the performance is complete.

I fully get that things happen.

Bill

^^ THIS.

Unless there is zero time available I try to transfer all audio to a thumb drive and use Sports Sounds Pro on my ThinkPad for playback.  I'll transcode any file that's not supported by SSP, too.

I carry 2 laptops for playback, 1 primary and the other a hot spare.  Often we'll have a CD player as well although it's been a long time since I've relied on one for primary playback.

For those playing along at home and who don't want to pay for Sports Sounds Pro, VLC media player has a mode to play a file and stop (it's deep in the Prefs:  Tools>Preferences>Interface>Show Settings ALL>Playlist>tick 'Play and stop').

 24 
 on: Yesterday at 10:30:11 pm 
Started by Robert Piascik - Last post by William Schnake
This just happened, but I'm sure it's happened to everyone. Choir director hands us a cd of backing tracks.

Did sound check with choir, no issues.

Show time and choir is second act. I am out front, wife is stage side. Performance time for choir comes, wife hits play on backing track, choir director tells her " that's not my cd".
Scott, about 5 years or so ago we made the decision that any track that is going to be played during a performance has to be transferred to our laptop or Mac Mini, whichever we have on site.  The reason is that we can control the track and know that it won't have problems.  We would never depend on a CD for a performance.  If the artist objects we let them verify we have removed it from our computer after the performance is complete.

I fully get that things happen.

Bill


 25 
 on: Yesterday at 10:20:01 pm 
Started by Jeff Bankston - Last post by Jeff Bankston
I've got a 48 channel K2 if you are interested.  A Church was the previous owner-never toured, 2 power supplies, no case
PM sent

 26 
 on: Yesterday at 09:47:12 pm 
Started by jesseweiss - Last post by Dennis Wiggins
Big difference between the DXR10 and DXR12? Assume we always use at least one sub.

DXR10 saves a little bit of money, but also 10 lbs in weight.

I just did a company picnic with 1 DXR10 over a pair of ZXA1-Subs.  My EZ-Up was about 20' out from the center of one end.  This very evenly covered the inside of the 50' x 100' open sided pavilion.  The award announcements were very easy to mix (gain ride) with the various presenters.  Every word was very clear.  Loud voices were smoothly limited, giving me plenty of reaction time to fix the gain. 

I had another DXR10 pointed about 45 deg off to a side to cover the game area.  I was able to run canned music and karaoke as loud as I needed.  The customer and I were both very satisfied.

They (DXR10s) have a limit as to much as to how much they can do, but will get pretty loud before you hit that.  If you over extend them, they don't really break up; they just don't go louder and dynamics go away (for good reason).

If I hadn't had a weight limit (sep·tu·a·ge·nar·i·an, soon), I would have bought the DXR12s for a fuller sound; not necessarily "louder", but more "there" there.  I expect I'll live with these for a long time.

Leave D Contour off.

-Dennis

 27 
 on: Yesterday at 09:02:21 pm 
Started by Earl F Young - Last post by Mike Caldwell
I actually had a new one as well that had am intermittent output due to basically no solder on the XLR connector.

Getting to the underside/solder side side of the main board takes a little disassembly work, remove cover, pull off front panel, un-solder the three power supply leads, take the screws out of all the xlr connectors, remove about six small screws the hold circuit board to the chassis, gently move board forward to clear XLR connectors, lift out from front to remove.

On re-assembly be sure to use the shortest screws on the bottom screw holes of the front panel, long screws will hit the circuit board.

Yea I have had a few of them apart to repair and re-cap at one time or another!!

 28 
 on: Yesterday at 08:40:16 pm 
Started by Earl F Young - Last post by Chris Hindle
My systems were based around TDM crossovers.
The XLR connectors were kind of weak point, if you flexed them much the leads would crack loose on the circuit board.

Some had an output muting option with an FET across pins two and three on the outputs, had one of those go bad once, I just removed the muting circuit, wasn't really needed they didn't make big noise on power up or down.

Does yours have the limiters?

What issues does yours have, may be a simple fix.

My 2nd 24CX-4 was likely finished 1st thing on a Monday morning.
I bought it used, and it was about 2 years old at that time.
Seems it was in a soundco "Just in case" rack, and was barely used.
I put it in my brand spankin new 8 mix bi-amp monitor rack..
First show, no issues.
Bounce around in the truck for 300 miles......
2nd show, 1 of the outputs is a little flakey. Only using 5 mixes that day so I patched around it.
Back at the shop, pulled the covers and lo and behold.....
3 of the XLR'e were NOT soldered to the board..
Easy fix, but still.......
I pulled the other CX-4, and 3 CX-2 that I had, they were all soldered up just fine.
My CX-4's didn't have limiters. The CX-2's did.

So, echoing Mike, it COULD be an easy fix. Pop the hood, and see what's inside.
Chris.

 29 
 on: Yesterday at 08:39:49 pm 
Started by Dave Garoutte - Last post by David Allred
Exactly my problem.
Blue is sort of the company color and will call attention to the part.
Black is probably more professional.
The speaker insert stob could be blue.

 30 
 on: Yesterday at 08:38:07 pm 
Started by Nathan Riddle - Last post by David Scoville
that is Freakin' Awesome no matter what lol Intense to say the least and yes yes Mad Max steampunk crazy!! 8) 8) 8)

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