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 1 
 on: Today at 07:56:18 am 
Started by Nathan Riddle - Last post by Ivan Beaver
If you remove the driver, you can nest them like handi-cups. :o
Like the old Community Levithans (the originals) with extensions.

You break them down into 3 pieces and the nest in each other.  Saved a lot of room on the truck.

For the show you "clip" them together.

 2 
 on: Today at 03:58:09 am 
Started by Wes Garland - Last post by Chris Grimshaw
I use a pair of older AKG C3000B, equivalent to the newer C4000B.  Either of those have cardioid and hyper cardioid settings as well as LPF.  The newer C3000B do not.

I use them in ensemble or choral or taiko settings.  In taiko, due to the movement I supplement with a pair of Omni reference mics in XY center stage and actively mix.  I have done some trad bluegrass with 1 centered too.  (in my case I take the bass separaty, unless the artist objects - almost never.)  Mostly I see David Gage Realist pickups installed or the ear trumpet condenser wedged in at the bridge anyway.

I bought a stereo pair of the older c3000B AKG’s used around $300.  They have proven quite useful

https://www.ebay.com/itm/AKG-C4000B-condenser-microphone/123182366495?hash=item1cae3dbf1f:g:IZ4AAOSwVxtbHVQj

Here is an eBay link to a used C4000B.

Mal, I think you're referring to the original C3000 mics - black body, green stripe and three red switches on the back.
I have a couple of those, too, and like them.

Not sure how you're using omni mics in an X-Y configuration. That implies they're coincident and at ~90 degrees to each other, which won't make a lot of difference between the two mics. For omnis, I find a spaced pair to be useful for recording larger ensembles. An X-Y configuration should be done with directional mics, or it won't work.

Chris

 3 
 on: Today at 03:39:07 am 
Started by Robert Piascik - Last post by Chris Grimshaw

For those playing along at home and who don't want to pay for Sports Sounds Pro, VLC media player has a mode to play a file and stop (it's deep in the Prefs:  Tools>Preferences>Interface>Show Settings ALL>Playlist>tick 'Play and stop').


When it comes to other people's USB drives, I scan for viruses first, then copy data to a temporary desktop folder. Had one the other day that had a trojan on it.

VLC for video playback, Foobar2000 for audio.

Chris

 4 
 on: Today at 01:49:17 am 
Started by Robert Piascik - Last post by Jonathan Johnson
I think almost any USB thumb drive sold in the last 10 years can transfer 2 track audio data fast enough - I've yet to experience one that doesn't... but I'm using a computer and not my console as playback source.

That said, there are a number of OS system function calls, hard drive utilities, even wireless networking... that can make your computer stutter.  I disable almost everything I can and I use the USB thumb drive because it never goes to sleep, unlike the spinning platter drives.

I don't trust other peoples' USB thumb drives for playback. At all. I copy the file to the "desktop" and play it from there.

I also have all sleep settings disabled on my laptop (including the drive and screen) when it's plugged in.

(Of course, I haven't seen any problems with playing back from USB in the last 10 years, either. Then again, I haven't played back from USB in the last 10 years...)

 5 
 on: Today at 01:12:55 am 
Started by John Schalk - Last post by Corey Scogin
Here ya go:
WAGO | COMPACT Splicing Connectors (221-613)


I just bought and used some of the 221-41x series (24-12AWG) and wow, they are really nice to work with. It's great to be able to visually verify that the cable is inserted properly and stripped to the correct length, especially for stranded wire. The ability to re-terminate them cleanly and connect multiple sizes of wire is also very nice. I'll be buying more.

 6 
 on: Today at 01:10:16 am 
Started by Robert Piascik - Last post by Wes Garland
Console wasn't the playback source - just using USB inputs instead of going through the analog hole.

I know what you mean about unlikelihood, but this drive actually looked like it might have been sourced more than a decade ago, LOL.   I DID double-check the kernel log, no wierd USB errors.  But files played from the harddrive and other keys work, so... (I suppose it's also possible the client encoded the files with dropouts.  Now that would be funny)

I also use that machine regularly to record and playback 32-channel audio without issues.  If it can keep up with 32 ch x 48kbps, it should be able to keep up with playing MP3s.

 7 
 on: Today at 01:05:10 am 
Started by craig.jones8 - Last post by Corey Scogin
Hi all, saw a duo packing their gear away last night and they were gathering up their mic and connecting cables. They then halved them end for end until they he’
 had a manageable length then tied them in a knot ! Any thoughts?

I used to do this and it mostly worked fine. When you tie the whole thing in a loose knot, the bend radius isn't very short. For cable management, it works well and requires no tie.

I quit wrapping my cables that way and now use the over/under method with ties because the end-to-end knot method would put a little bit of memory into the cables keeping them from laying flat when uncoiled if they were anything but warm. Over/under makes a longer bend radius such that the cables are more likely to lay flat when uncoiled.

Plus, over/under is just the right way and there is no other way. ;)

 8 
 on: Today at 12:58:09 am 
Started by Robert Piascik - Last post by Tim McCulloch
That's pretty good advice.  I played tracks at a gig a few weekends ago and had a bunch of dropouts.  I'm 99.9% sure the customer-supplied thumb drive couldn't stream the MP3s fast enough.  Which seems implausible, but God Only Knows what dollar store the drive came from.  I use that laptop to stream audio on a regular basis without issue, going from Mixxx into my X32 via USB.  Never had an issue before.

I think almost any USB thumb drive sold in the last 10 years can transfer 2 track audio data fast enough - I've yet to experience one that doesn't... but I'm using a computer and not my console as playback source.

That said, there are a number of OS system function calls, hard drive utilities, even wireless networking... that can make your computer stutter.  I disable almost everything I can and I use the USB thumb drive because it never goes to sleep, unlike the spinning platter drives.

 9 
 on: Today at 12:01:39 am 
Started by Isaac South - Last post by Mike Caldwell
In this case a picture is not worth a thousand words!!

Do you have two stage wedge monitor mixers, the cables plugged into outputs 1 & 2 make me think so.

Outputs 11 and 12 look there your main Left Right outputs, you could unplug one at a time and see the main speakers go out one side at a time and at the same time check and see if the subs go out when you unplug outputs 11 & 12, if they do your subs are not on an aux.

The Dynacord amps in the bottom of the rack all have DSP /crossover processing built in, maybe they have not been properly set up......or all of us here have seen many times where an installer never set up a DSP and it's just passing signal straight through.

With the three amps I'm going to guess one is for stage monitors, follow the cables from outputs 1 & 2, I bet they go to an amp.

The other two amps are for the main system, but they could be done a couple differnt ways. One amp runs the Left Right mains and the other on the subs or one channel of the amps run the mains and the other runs the subs.

Take a picture of the back of the rack.

I'm guessing your IEM transmitters are being fed from the Allen Heath ME1 monitor stations.

Are there any cables connected to the outputs on the back of the mixer?

As for the installer you should be blaming them for their lack of system training.

Were you with the church when this install was finished or did you come in sometime afterwards?


 10 
 on: Yesterday at 11:54:33 pm 
Started by Isaac South - Last post by Mark Cadwallader
It does not look like you have an aux-fed sub channel. Channels 11 and 12 (out) are your main L and R channels.  Those two channels are processed to create a crossover for the subs and the tops. My guess is that the crossover functions are handled by the amplifiers, as suggested earlier by Tim.

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