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 91 
 on: Yesterday at 06:22:19 pm 
Started by Debbie Dunkley - Last post by Tim McCulloch
Holy crap Scott - you are a clever sausage !!!..... This will take some reading a few times over.

There are a lot of IT folks here - Bob Leonard, Rob Spence, at least 3 Scotts and a bunch of guys I can't name right away...

There is a sticky thread about networking basics over at the Classic LAB:
http://forums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/topic,141876.0.html

Back when bookstores were physical things and fairly common I was looking for a "Networking for complete idiots".  The infamous, yellow "..... for Dummies" didn't teach enough beyond my existing knowledge to spend $20 on.  I ended up buying Peter Norton's Complete Guide to Networking.  In comparison, the yellow Dummies book ended at about Chapter 2 of the Norton book... It's not a readable tome - riveting only if you're an insomniac - but I learned most of what I needed to know from it.

It's dated now and there was some discussion back then about just how complete it was but it served me well.  If you see it at a used book store, buy it.

Now for your homework, young lady:  The OSI model.  It's what Scott Holtzman was referring to in his Layer Cake analogy.  A G-search was most informative (hint).  It won't immediately help fix your problem but understanding where, between Physical layer and Application layer, things might be amiss will help you in the long run.


 92 
 on: Yesterday at 06:09:14 pm 
Started by Debbie Dunkley - Last post by Debbie Dunkley
My bad Debbie.

I thought you meant to connect to a wireless router by connecting the router to the X18 through the Ethernet connector.

In theory, you don't even need a router to connect directly between your computing device and the XR18 since most physical layers will allow point to point connections as well as connections to routers/switches.

Try to connect your PC directly to your XR18 at home.  If you can do this, then your XR18 is configured correctly.  If we get that far, we can see what is up with your iPad ;)

No worries Scott - I don't have everything out today but I successfully connected X air edit on my Mac desk top to the XR18 when I first got the mixer - so I know that works.
I have connected the the iPad wirelessly to the XR18 through an external  router a few times successfully so all the other functions are checked off......it's just the hard wire option I need to achieve.

 93 
 on: Yesterday at 06:06:00 pm 
Started by Jay Marr - Last post by Mal Brown
Ultimate support stands with the leveling leg.  Do not leave home without it!  Mine are the 110BL, gas assist and they work great.  I have set them on stairs and out side on uneven terrain and was able to make it work easily.  Not cheap but great


 94 
 on: Yesterday at 06:01:11 pm 
Started by Jay Marr - Last post by Scott Holtzman
IMHO (based partially on 20+ years in a Structural Engineering firm), I'd say your question doesn't have as much to do with Center of Gravity as it does with the Lever Arm (overturning action).  A tripod stand that is not fully deployed will be easier to tip over.  Not saying it should never be done, but that it should ONLY be done after weighing all the factors.

Dave

I have never seen a pro deploy a stand without ballast so all our lighting and speaker stands go out with three saddle bags of lead shot. 


 95 
 on: Yesterday at 06:00:47 pm 
Started by Debbie Dunkley - Last post by Scott Bolt
My bad Debbie.

I thought you meant to connect to a wireless router by connecting the router to the X18 through the Ethernet connector.

In theory, you don't even need a router to connect directly between your computing device and the XR18 since most physical layers will allow point to point connections as well as connections to routers/switches.

Try to connect your PC directly to your XR18 at home.  If you can do this, then your XR18 is configured correctly.  If we get that far, we can see what is up with your iPad ;)

 96 
 on: Yesterday at 05:59:51 pm 
Started by Corey Scogin - Last post by John Fruits
Last time Lee Brice was through these parts he was going through a Paragon.

This was 2015, not sure if they are still able to keep it functioning t hough.

I wonder about the story on the engineer's throne, is there a reason for only 3 wheels? Did they carry it with them or was it provided locally?

 97 
 on: Yesterday at 05:59:40 pm 
Started by Debbie Dunkley - Last post by Debbie Dunkley
I think what confuses Debby is the QU must have some form of network discover perhaps Layer 2 (this exists under IP at the Ethernet level). 

The X-AIR has one IP stack.  The switch (confirmed today on my XR-12) switches what is called the PHY or physical layer (Layer 1).  The MAC and IP address stay the same.

Debbie.  Think of networks as a cake, protocols built on top of protocols.  IP, for us, is the top of the cake.

Layer 1 - Cabling or wireless, the physical network
Layer 2 - Ethernet, the addressing at Layer 2 is called a MAC (media access control) address.  Software can use MAC to MAC communications.  You lighting does this. 
Layer 3 - IP or Internet Protocol.  IP addresses are used to identify on the network.  All IP features, routing, multicast etc. are available to software. 

The basics always apply.  For two devices to communicate they must be on the same network (as defined by the subnet mask).  So if you are using a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 that means the first three octets (numbers between the dots) have to match.  Hosts (any device with an IP address) must have a unique address in the last position. 

Even the numbering is easy once you do the math.  255 is the largest number people with 8 fingers can count to (computers always think in multiples of 8) so 2^8 = 256, 0 is a significant place so 0-255 become your usable IP's.  The first IP is reserved to identify the network and the last is used to broadcast messages to all hosts on the network so we can't use those two.  That leaves us with 254 usable IP addresses when using a 255.255.255.0 or 24 bit mask (8*3=24)

Any help?

Holy crap Scott - you are a clever sausage !!!..... This will take some reading a few times over.

 98 
 on: Yesterday at 05:56:21 pm 
Started by Mac Kerr - Last post by Scott Holtzman
I got an interesting gig for this coming week. It is an immersive audio experience, but it's the location that got me interested. We will be mic'ing an 8 piece orchestral ensemble inside the Bell Labs anechoic chamber. They will play with a piano in an adjoining room that has 64 Genelec speakers. The audience will be in the room with the piano. The ensemble will be processed with a Sonic Emotions Wave 1 3D processor with routing to the 64 speakers via a 64x64 MADI router from a Digico SD11. The ensemble will be on headphones with Aviom mixers.

I took the job so I could go inside the chamber.

Mac

Mac is that in Murray Hill or Whippany?

 99 
 on: Yesterday at 05:53:22 pm 
Started by Ben Easler - Last post by Robert Healey
Thanks - I have heard some EVU systems and thought they worked well. I have not heard the Vue products anywhere yet. The mains are Renkus Heinz ST4. We have their fills in the upper area for fill. I think PNX82 off the top of my head but they are a bit more than I want to spend on this particular project.

Renkus has the lower-budget CX62 and the mid-range TX62 which are similar to the options you are evaluating and should be a lot less than the PNX82.

 100 
 on: Yesterday at 05:52:19 pm 
Started by Debbie Dunkley - Last post by Scott Holtzman
Aren't IP addresses - static or otherwise all related to wi-fi though?
Maybe that is what I am not understanding. My problem is not with wi-fi connectivity, I never have issues connecting to the XR from my ipad using either the built in WAP or using an external router (or at least no more than I usually would) .
My problem is if I try to use my camera adaptor to hard wire using ethernet, it doesn't work.
When I connect to my QU-PAC, all I have to do is turn off wifi on my ipad, plug in the camera cable, hub and ethernet cable and it sees the QU-PAC immediately. I was expecting the same simplicity using the XR18 but I think I am missing something.
I tried to make the change in network settings on the XR app but it doesn't take.
I may never have to even use this set up because:
1) My QU-PAC is my main mixer anyway - or sometimes I  might use my QU-16 - and these both work with the hardwired set-up,
2) I have never had to resort to going hardwired at a show and this would be a last resort for me.
BUT it would be nice to be able to use both the QU-PAC and the XR18 hardwired for peace of mind.

I think what confuses Debby is the QU must have some form of network discover perhaps Layer 2 (this exists under IP at the Ethernet level). 

The X-AIR has one IP stack.  The switch (confirmed today on my XR-12) switches what is called the PHY or physical layer (Layer 1).  The MAC and IP address stay the same.

Debbie.  Think of networks as a cake, protocols built on top of protocols.  IP, for us, is the top of the cake.

Layer 1 - Cabling or wireless, the physical network
Layer 2 - Ethernet, the addressing at Layer 2 is called a MAC (media access control) address.  Software can use MAC to MAC communications.  You lighting does this. 
Layer 3 - IP or Internet Protocol.  IP addresses are used to identify on the network.  All IP features, routing, multicast etc. are available to software. 

The basics always apply.  For two devices to communicate they must be on the same network (as defined by the subnet mask).  So if you are using a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 that means the first three octets (numbers between the dots) have to match.  Hosts (any device with an IP address) must have a unique address in the last position. 

Even the numbering is easy once you do the math.  255 is the largest number people with 8 fingers can count to (computers always think in multiples of 8) so 2^8 = 256, 0 is a significant place so 0-255 become your usable IP's.  The first IP is reserved to identify the network and the last is used to broadcast messages to all hosts on the network so we can't use those two.  That leaves us with 254 usable IP addresses when using a 255.255.255.0 or 24 bit mask (8*3=24)

Any help?

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