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 1 
 on: Today at 01:08:08 pm 
Started by kel mcguire - Last post by kel mcguire
A venue where I mix regular friday and saturday concerts has a "temporary" deisel generator (for 14 concerts so far) because of a fried transformer that feeds the shops and restaurants in the area around the concert venue. The sound system with lights draws probably around 50 amps plus a beer garden with refrigerated truck . From what I understand, nothing on shore power in interconnected with our little island of stuff. The venue is now asking the sound engineer to power up/down the generator for each show...which wasn't in our job description for the past 6 years...but that's a different story.
 
 Anyhow,
For the most part it has worked reasonably well but sometimes the system has just felt saggy. One time upon turning on the front fill stage lights, which are on the FOH circuit, the entire FOH went dead, then came back on. Scary. Apparently there is an Eco mode on the generator.

The guitar player this past saturday brought his own transformer and voltage tester since he plays vintage tube amps and has encountered issues with power. He mentioned that we were at about 99 volts. So, not having ever tested anything(too trusting), I plugged a tester into the circuits and brought up 100 volts. As control, I plugged same tester into a nearby business on shore power and got 117

So, a few questions:
-at what low-side voltage point does digital equipment not function correctly, like digital mixing boards or keyboards? Class D amps?

-Does the voltage output on these generators drift from shutdown to the next concert? over the course of weeks? It is the same generator every week.

-I have unplugged nearly the whole stage after each show before turning the gennie off, then reverse the process by waiting till the generator is warmed up before plugging in all the power amps and FOH. Is this advisable? I'm afraid of voltage ramp up/down from past experiences.

-If I wanted to insure the correct settings, would my process be: to fire up the generator, let it warm up and settle down, meter the edison outlet while massaging the voltage knob? Or would there be reason the voltage on the tails would be different that the supplied edison 15a circuit?


 2 
 on: Today at 12:54:55 pm 
Started by Brian Strike - Last post by Rob Spence
Put a transformer between the LS9 and the camera. Phantom, even by accident, is not pleasant when applied to the LS9 outputs. Mine survived it but the noise..
Not all desks survive though.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

 3 
 on: Today at 12:49:44 pm 
Started by Scott Holtzman - Last post by Rob Spence
And, around here I see current building of more strip malls. Who needs more stores anyway?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

 4 
 on: Today at 12:34:16 pm 
Started by billy merritt - Last post by Scott Holtzman
Acoustic impedance of the crossover..?

What?

Measuring the driver in the cabinet is good to do - you'll get baffle-step, diffraction, standing waves etc all showing up in the frequency response.
I know all the words in your sentence, but AFAIK it makes no sense from a Physics point-of-view.

Chris

My apologies, should have read (and please let me know if this makes sense).

Quote
You also have to test the driver in the cabinet it will be used.  The driver will exhibit different characteristics in the cabinet as the driver has to work harder to overcome the acoustic impedance of the crossover.

 5 
 on: Today at 12:30:39 pm 
Started by Jonathan Hiemberg - Last post by Tim McCulloch

Good luck and keep us posted.

Secondly, no modern generator (especially a 50K genny) is going to need to be "flashed". That's generally for vintage generators that haven't been used in decades.

If the genset is reasonably modern, it sounds like the OP's problem is a defective exciter circuit.

 6 
 on: Today at 12:28:35 pm 
Started by David Allred - Last post by David Allred
I like the belt'n'suspenders method, but I do it by using a PC running Edit and a tablet running the app. I happen to have both an ipad and an android tablet and have used one as a backup to the other.

This gives you a fader available all the time on the tablet and you can use the mouse to change EQ and stuff on the PC. It works really well this way.


Unless you have a large screen on your computer I don't see how multiple instances of edit is any easier than just tabbing through the different windows of one instance of Edit.

Excellent points.  I  just bought a Galaxy Tab A (primarily for it's 5ghz wifi capability)

 7 
 on: Today at 11:56:13 am 
Started by Dan Mortensen - Last post by Jason Glass
Speaking Los Angeles, Block G went unauctioned in that market. That's 10MHz of unused, and unusable spectrum in a market that will probably end up with 18MHz-24MHz of useable spectrum.

Hi Cameron,

I was just examining the data found here https://auctiondata.fcc.gov/public/projects/1000/reports/assignment-results_by_license and see that block G is indeed missing from LA.  This strikes me as strange, because it's the one of very few examples that I can find on the list where a block isn't shown as sold.  Considering that LA is the second largest market in the nation, I must wonder if we're certain that this omission from the list isn't an error?

UPDATE:
I just noticed discrepancies between license grant announcements here https://auctiondata.fcc.gov/public/projects/1000/reports/assignment-results_by_license and here https://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2017/db0614/DA-17-582A3.pdf I hope the former is kept up to date, and the latter was published 6/14/17.  Nashville, for example, shows blocks A through G on the current PRS page, while the PDF shows only blocks A through F.

Looks like we'll have to continually sift through multiple documents to get to the bottom of what's actually happening.

 8 
 on: Today at 11:44:19 am 
Started by billy merritt - Last post by Chris Grimshaw
You also have to test the driver in the cabinet it will be used.  The driver will exhibit different characteristics in the cabinet as the driver has to work harder to overcome the acoustic impedance of the crossover.

Acoustic impedance of the crossover..?

What?

Measuring the driver in the cabinet is good to do - you'll get baffle-step, diffraction, standing waves etc all showing up in the frequency response.
I know all the words in your sentence, but AFAIK it makes no sense from a Physics point-of-view.

Chris

 9 
 on: Today at 11:14:29 am 
Started by Scott Holtzman - Last post by John Roberts {JR}
What is sad along with the decline of B&M retail is all the seasonal part-time jobs that helped teens learn how to work... Basically show up on time and do what they are told. One important skill is learning how to deal with difficult customers. Future generations will be even less prepared for life.

JR

 10 
 on: Today at 11:14:12 am 
Started by Brian Strike - Last post by Mac Kerr
Usually, when needing a mono recording send, I use the Mono buss, patch it to one of your omnis, you'd have to turn on the "mono" buss send on each input you want include in the recording.  An easier way though if you want the whole R/L mix, would be to use a matrix.  Send the R&L to the matrix of choice, and patch the matrix to an omni.
(Tim beat me)

Usually when needing a mono recording send I use a mono aux send. With an aux I can rebalance the mix for the recording, adding back in things like guitars that are too loud from the amps to add much of to the PA, or reduce effects returns that sound great in the room but are too loud in the recording.

Mac

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