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 11 
 on: Today at 09:59:43 am 
Started by LeVan Moxley - Last post by Steve Litscher
Indoors, 40' wide, 60' deep, 23'ceiling, square room.

1-2 JTR C212Pros will fill that room with more bass than you could ask for.

 12 
 on: Today at 09:39:35 am 
Started by Debbie Dunkley - Last post by Debbie Dunkley

Yep, those are to help keep sweat from running down the boom and directly into the mic element.

Yes Tim - that's it. I only mentioned it because mine came off and got caught in my hair and the reason I didn't lose it was because when I removed the ear hook, the little protector was still hanging in my hair. It is so small, it would be impossible to see on the floor.
Good news for me is I'm not jumping around on stage so unless I am outside on a very hot day, not a lot of sweat on my face.

 13 
 on: Today at 09:31:49 am 
Started by Nathan Riddle - Last post by Marc Sibilia
Adjustments to time within software is limited to a resolution of 1 sample period.

REW will do sub-sample alignment of impulse response, so it will be better for amplifier/mixer/processor measurements if you are concerned about phase at high frequency.

Quote from the manual:

The Sub-sample timing adjustment selection controls whether REW adjusts the impulse response timing to resolution below a single sample when setting t=0 at the IR peak or using the other channel as timing reference. Sub-sample timing adjustment requires a resampling of the impulse response to perform the adjustment, which slightly raises the noise floor of the measurement - however the increase is far below the noise floor of a typical acoustic measurement and sub-sample adjustment provides more accurate phase information at high frequencies.

Marc

 14 
 on: Today at 09:27:15 am 
Started by Mac Kerr - Last post by Mac Kerr
This topic has been moved to LAB Lounge.

http://forums.prosoundweb.com/index.php?topic=168006.0

 15 
 on: Today at 09:26:54 am 
Started by Debbie Dunkley - Last post by Tim McCulloch
No I'm not talking about the little wiremesh or foam protectors. There is a plastic piece that appears to do nothing but keep the boom away from the skin and clips to the boom itself..
In the box, the 'extras' are: wiremesh screens, foam screens, make up protectors and these little perspiration protectors.


Yep, those are to help keep sweat from running down the boom and directly into the mic element.

 16 
 on: Today at 09:17:58 am 
Started by Debbie Dunkley - Last post by Debbie Dunkley
Debbie...the 'extras in the box' you speak of are not extras but different HF response caps. Yes they do come off easily

No I'm not talking about the little wiremesh or foam protectors. There is a plastic piece that appears to do nothing but keep the boom away from the skin and clips to the boom itself..
In the box, the 'extras' are: wiremesh screens, foam screens, make up protectors and these little perspiration protectors.

 17 
 on: Today at 09:05:54 am 
Started by Jesper Kragh - Last post by Mike Santarelli
I recently demoed a few rcf tops and subs and own the srx828. Based on what I heard, one 8004 should put out what many double 18s do. Itís a monster of a sub. The srx subs are great but not in the same league.

Iíd take the 8004 or 9004 over anything you listed without question. Itís a better sub and just seeing them in person, the construction and fit and finish are way beyond the others. Itís a professional box compared to MI grade imo.

Agree with Tim. Go with the 8004 or 9004.

 18 
 on: Today at 09:00:25 am 
Started by Nathan Riddle - Last post by Tim McCulloch
Adjustments to time within software is limited to a resolution of 1 sample period.

 19 
 on: Today at 08:58:00 am 
Started by Matt Davis - Last post by TJ (Tom) Cornish
Okay, that makes sense. The people that are in charge of the redesign are apparently really set on having an extra wide screen. My initial thought was edge blending, but I know someone who said his church achieved the same thing with one projector at about $9k.

Realistically, how large of a picture could you get in 2:39:1 and still have it be bright enough with around a $7k budget?
If we do go with a multi projector setup, is this doable with something more affordable, like the Sony VPL-PHZ10?
Disclaimer - I am not a projector expert and I have never personally done edge blending.  The following is napkin math to help you think.  Beyond that, hopefully someone else can help more.

With a 2 projector blend covering a 2.39:1 aspect ratio, each projector needs to cover at least 1.2:1 aspect ratio, and wider than that will be the blend.  A 16:10 format projector (1920x1200) rather than a 16:9 format projector (1920x1080) gives you a ratio of 1.6:1, meaning that about 30% of each projector image will overlap. This gives you an effective resolution of about 2688x1200, rather than the 1920x800 you would get with a single cropped projector.  That is noticeably sharper (in theory) - 3.2 megapixels vs 1.5 megapixels. 

Edge blending lives or dies based on lens distortion and image uniformity - brightness and color.  Laser projectors help with this since they have much less brightness and color drift as the light sources age compared to lamp-based projectors, but optics still matter.  A lens with significant barrel or pincushion distortion will make it difficult to blend seamlessly, as the blended pixels will be projected in a different place.  I believe software can help with this to some degree, but quality optics will produce a significantly better result. Optimal projector mounting will be important as well so you're not fighting keystoning.

Your example 5000 lumen projectors would be about 7,000 lumens combined in this way, which might be bright enough depending on your expectations and how much ambient light you are competing with.  It would certainly be better from a brightness standpoint than a 5000 lumen projector cropped producing about 3750 lumens into that screen shape.  I can't say if the optics are good enough or if there would be other challenges.


 20 
 on: Today at 08:54:29 am 
Started by Gordon Brinton - Last post by Tim McCulloch
While huge is not needed for delays, I would also caution against going too small as the person mixing is not usually in the delay zone and it can be easy to boost into limiting/distortion without realizing it.

I recall one club who had eons as delays in the back bar/merch area. They usually started the night sounding passable but by the end of the night were brutal.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

That's most bar sound, regardless of zone.

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