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 1 
 on: Today at 08:00:55 am 
Started by Jonathan Goodall - Last post by Nathan Riddle
The digital trim is used for doing monitor splits; so the gain on the monitor desk can be adjusted without effecting the gain of the Mic pre's on the FOH console. (or visa versa as per A&H's video)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD3L0SK0FTA

While that's great, I still don't see why it's necessary. It is either peaking or it isn't. If it isn't peaking it isn't a problem (for the sound, workflow might be compromised I guess?)

 2 
 on: Today at 07:58:36 am 
Started by Jonathan Goodall - Last post by Nathan Riddle
I think the primary reason for having a digital trim is for when the source is digital. Since there is no preamp to adjust with a digital input the trim is the way you set the level. With an analog input, it gives you the option to trim the channel level while keeping the preamp gain optimized for the best level to the AD convertor.

I don't think any other place is any better to have the trim. Where ever it ends up there are other ways to accomplish what it might do.

Mac

You're right, that makes complete sense.

I was used to QU where those were combined into the single control, the trim functionality wasn't broken up. I still don't see why it should be broken up.

What I don't get is why the need to decrease level, it is either at 0dBFS or it isn't. I can see adding gain though.

---

What I've always thought digital trim was to keep the input preamp 'hot' for sends, direct outs, & other prefader outputs and then pad down the level to the fader (so the fader is closer to zero) for finer control.

https://www.prosoundweb.com/channels/church/church_sound_2-5_ways_to_set_up_input_gain1/

 3 
 on: Today at 07:57:52 am 
Started by Ken Cross - Last post by David Allred
Throwing a protractor on the picture, it looks like the front floor seats to the rear balcony seats could be covered by a speaker with a 50 deg vertical.  60 degs gets an additional row up front.
A center cluster pair fully splayed appear to not need a full 180 horizontal. 
With the seating as shown you might start by modeling 80 x 50 speakers.  80 x 60 (if such a creature exits) would be a good choice as well.  90 x 60 is going to get on the walls more and creep around to the stage edges, but definitely fills the space.

 4 
 on: Today at 07:46:58 am 
Started by Jonathan Goodall - Last post by Peter Morris
The digital trim is used for doing monitor splits; so the gain on the monitor desk can be adjusted without effecting the gain of the Mic pre's on the FOH console. (or visa versa as per A&H's video)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD3L0SK0FTA

 5 
 on: Today at 07:43:18 am 
Started by Gian Luca Cavalliini - Last post by Henry Cohen
Isn't the noise floor in RF analysers dependent on RBW (Resolution Bandwidth)?

Yes.


Quote
I know the RFExplorer has an RBW value that changes accordingly dependant on span. Don't know if you can change the RBW on the Kaltman leaving the span intact... What are the RBW settings on both units?

The OP did say he used "similar" RBW values, but were they close enough?


Quote
I wonder, would different sensitivities still get you the same power metering on a carrier frequency?

This would also depend on whether the units are set to average or peak detector, but in general, a relatively narrowband carrier strength shown will not be dependent on the RBW, though the occupied channel bandwidth would be.

 6 
 on: Today at 07:37:35 am 
Started by LeVan Moxley - Last post by Pete Erskine
I thought there may be better options now.  Thanks.

My favorites are Blackdog Audio with 2 transformer outputs and
AudioBox with 2 in and 2 out with transformers.  Both use standard drivers and are powered via usb.

http://www.blackdogaudio.net/   $165
http://www.arx.com.au/worldwide/audibox_usb_io.htm   $374.oo

 7 
 on: Today at 07:31:34 am 
Started by Roberto Orozco - Last post by Ivan Beaver
The BEST way to set limiter voltages is to MEASURE them, using a sine wave a voltmeter.

Calculators can be useful-IF everything is correct that is entered into them.

I have know some amp gains to be different (as much as 4dB) than what the spec sheet says.

I know one major amp manufacturer who considers the gain to be normal if it is +/- 1 dB over published specs.

Simply put a sine wave in, adjust the gain so that the measured voltage on the output is higher (I like at least 10%) than the voltage you will limit to.

BE SURE the speakers are NOT hooked up at this time!!!!!!!

Then simply turn down the threshold until you get to the desired voltage.

If you are using multistage limiters, be SURE to do the peak or highest limiter first, and the continuous or heating limiter last.

 8 
 on: Today at 06:54:50 am 
Started by Jonathan Goodall - Last post by Spenser Hamilton
I think the primary reason for having a digital trim is for when the source is digital. Since there is no preamp to adjust with a digital input the trim is the way you set the level. With an analog input, it gives you the option to trim the channel level while keeping the preamp gain optimized for the best level to the AD convertor.

I don't think any other place is any better to have the trim. Where ever it ends up there are other ways to accomplish what it might do.

Mac

Mac is right, typically I only use digital trim on MADI or AES sources, occasionally a really hot keyboard input if it's not clipping the preamp and I am too lazy to walk to the stage and pad the DI box.

 9 
 on: Today at 06:31:47 am 
Started by Jonathan Johnson - Last post by John Fruits
One further thought, in the OP it was referred to as a lower case "church", not as an all-caps "CHURCH", so if it has not yet been consecrated it isn't really a CHURCH church, merely a church.  In further  pedantry, it is possible that the basement really isn't a basement but an undercroft.  Also, if we were to discuss the musical sub-genre of "The Tulsa Sound" we would have to refer to The [C-word] Studio at 3rd and Trenton.

 10 
 on: Today at 04:56:37 am 
Started by Ken Webster - Last post by Ken Webster
What is your "system" makes, models, part numbers, pictures, ect.

As far as software goes....REW is free and not too bad, SMAART is something like $900. Any software tool is not just a plug and play make a pretty picture on your computer screen and your sound system magically sounds better. It takes a bit of practice to know what your looking at and what to adjust, yes I'm still learning!

Video Projector

   NEC MT 1020G/820G

Video Splitter

   Quest tm VGS2

Microphones

    McCardin radio mic set (2ch) (1 head mic and transmitter)

    Shure SM58 x4

    Leem SF-600 x1

    Peavey PV Low Z Cardioid Dynamic x6

    Condenser mic of unknown brand

CD Player

    Denon DWR-840

DVD/Video Player

    LG DC593W
   
Mixing Desk

   Yamaha MR-1642

Graphic Equalizers

   Yamaha Q2031, A (FOH), B (FB)

Amplifiers

    QSC MMX1450 Power Amp (FOH)
   
    Perreaux 3000B Power Amp (FB)  (2x Line isolation units Redback A2513)

Speakers
 
    Fold Back
   
        Interlink 1201F 2 in use, 2 spare 400W 8 ohm

    FOH
        Built Up 2 of

      Enclosures:   100 L
      Tweeters:   Motorola KSN 1 142 Piezo
      Horns:      Ross KSN 1 151
      Drivers:   Selenium 12PW3C-E
      Crossovers:   Jaycar Kit CX-2612 with load resistors on HF

    Cables 4 x 7.5m 14 AWG.

PCs

    PC1 XP (Sound) backup Maxtor One Touch 3 mini

    PC2 Vista (Video presentations)

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