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 1 
 on: Today at 05:01:57 pm 
Started by Mike Santarelli - Last post by Richard Penrose
Iím also interested in these speakers myself. Fatial Pro and BMS drivers powered by Hypex amp modules and built in Germany! Am going to see if I can get a pair to try.

 2 
 on: Today at 04:59:33 pm 
Started by Josh Billings - Last post by Robert Healey
While there is  valuable experience in studio design, there are a lot of differences between sound isolation in studios and in larger buildings, especially in construction techniques that may not be allowed in assembly spaces.

As I mentioned earlier, an acoustical consultant can help. The OP will probably need an architect and a general contractor once they start modifying the building to implement a consultant's recommendations, too. This is outside of DIY territory (disclaimer: I am an acoustical consultant). As long as we are listing general references, however, here are two building-focused references that contain good information for general reference.

A Guide To Airborne, Impact, and Structure Borne Noise Control in Muftifamily Dwellings is an excellent overview. It is 50 years old and has been ignored by architects for the same period of time: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED024212.pdf

Handbook of Acoustical Measurement and Noise Control by  Cyril M. Harris. Technical but very through.


 3 
 on: Today at 04:58:15 pm 
Started by Mike Santarelli - Last post by Stu McDoniel
Looks like Fatal Pro loudspeakers and BMS compression drivers in them.

German made.

They appear to be pretty decent quality.


 4 
 on: Today at 04:30:16 pm 
Started by Mike Santarelli - Last post by Mike Santarelli
Iím looking into some smaller mains for small gigs. I heard these the other day and thought they sounded really good. 

Does anyone have an opinion of these and how this series is?  Are they considered ďproĒ or MI grade. Looks like they use decent components. I couldnít find much on LD systems other than some ad type reviews.

 5 
 on: Today at 04:29:11 pm 
Started by Justin Joyner - Last post by Steven Eudaly
I can't stand SLX stuff. Sounds terrible to me and the plastic bodies break very easily. The sound you don't really notice until you use a "nicer" or at least a more modern wireless system, but once you notice it you'll wonder why you ever thought SLX was passable.

We (begrudgingly) still have a couple in rental stock and I very much look forward to replacing them.


 6 
 on: Today at 03:55:47 pm 
Started by James A. Griffin - Last post by James A. Griffin
They are $258 new on ebay, looking to to better on new or lightly used.  Looking for 2-4 units.


jamesgriffinav@gmail.com

 7 
 on: Today at 03:52:13 pm 
Started by Tracy Garner - Last post by Phil Graham
Phil...amazing.  thanks for the pics. 

I was recovering from surgery during the Republican convention and moving slowly.  Poor Henry Cohen was patient with me.  The walk from the broadcast truck bays to the floor was about 1/2 mile.  Can't imaging how physically taxing  working MB must be.

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

Scott,

It's quite the structure. Simultaneously completely silly and a great experience as an attending fan. Spacious, excellent food, lots of places to mill about/explore. It was way over budget, but it does seem like Mr. Blank continued to say "yes" even though the numbers increased.

 8 
 on: Today at 03:24:34 pm 
Started by Debbie Dunkley - Last post by Scott Holtzman
+1000

I've been in electronics manufacturing for more than 35 years.  Everything from weapons spec military gear to consumer electronics.  Have been an engineering manager in multiple contract manufacturers, been in the tech centers of others, and currently work on the OEM side.  It's expired now but I've held a Mil-Std-2000 soldering certification.  As well as having contributed to the spec itself.

What's on my bench at home is a Metcal 500 series.  I did a bunch of beta testing for them and this was comp'd.  But I would have spent my own money to get one anyway.  As the saying goes:  There's nothing more expensive than a cheap tool.  I've done everything with Metcals from Fender tube amps to adding jumper wires to 4K image sensors.

As for leaded vs. lead free.  It's just about impossible to find products with leaded solder these days.  The primary difference is that leaded solder is more ductile.  It gives a bit under strain, but also suffers from fatigue failure more easily.  SAC305 is stronger but can be fractured by shock more easily.  It's a trade off.  Then you have the metallurgy of circuit board and component finishes, my day job life for the last 35 years.

Rosin fluxes are just about extinct.  All the efforts in chemistry are in "no-clean" fluxes.  Some products are made with organic acid based fluxes and water washed where they have to be conformal coated or high power RF where leakage is an issue.  Rosin fluxes need solvent cleaning and industry can't effectively deal with solvents and safety/environmental regulations.  So about the only place you see rosin is with hobbyists stuck in the last century.
My personal favorite hand solder flux is Alpha NR205.  I also have some samples of flux from Indium and Senju that work well (part of being in industry is rep's constantly asking me to try stuff).  All of them are no clean.

Thank God I still have 1/2 a case of 20 year old flux stripper - Firmly stuck in the last century with my Hexacon Therm-O-Trac and Pace rework station (from the 80's)

 9 
 on: Today at 02:53:17 pm 
Started by Dennis Wiggins - Last post by Dennis Wiggins
I can see PMs that I receive, but cannot see PMs I have originated, or any text of my replies.

-Dennis

 10 
 on: Today at 02:52:40 pm 
Started by Debbie Dunkley - Last post by Stephen Kirby
Amid all the Hakkomania, I'd like to put in a word for the Metcal. I have some MX500s (but there are later models). The tip selection means you can do anything from TSSOP ICs to plumbing repairs.
+1000

I've been in electronics manufacturing for more than 35 years.  Everything from weapons spec military gear to consumer electronics.  Have been an engineering manager in multiple contract manufacturers, been in the tech centers of others, and currently work on the OEM side.  It's expired now but I've held a Mil-Std-2000 soldering certification.  As well as having contributed to the spec itself.

What's on my bench at home is a Metcal 500 series.  I did a bunch of beta testing for them and this was comp'd.  But I would have spent my own money to get one anyway.  As the saying goes:  There's nothing more expensive than a cheap tool.  I've done everything with Metcals from Fender tube amps to adding jumper wires to 4K image sensors.

As for leaded vs. lead free.  It's just about impossible to find products with leaded solder these days.  The primary difference is that leaded solder is more ductile.  It gives a bit under strain, but also suffers from fatigue failure more easily.  SAC305 is stronger but can be fractured by shock more easily.  It's a trade off.  Then you have the metallurgy of circuit board and component finishes, my day job life for the last 35 years.

Rosin fluxes are just about extinct.  All the efforts in chemistry are in "no-clean" fluxes.  Some products are made with organic acid based fluxes and water washed where they have to be conformal coated or high power RF where leakage is an issue.  Rosin fluxes need solvent cleaning and industry can't effectively deal with solvents and safety/environmental regulations.  So about the only place you see rosin is with hobbyists stuck in the last century.
My personal favorite hand solder flux is Alpha NR205.  I also have some samples of flux from Indium and Senju that work well (part of being in industry is rep's constantly asking me to try stuff).  All of them are no clean.

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