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Author Topic: 1/4" TS and TRS Question?  (Read 5820 times)

Jacob Robinson

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1/4" TS and TRS Question?
« on: October 03, 2011, 10:47:03 am »

I have a question as to what would happen or what would be the correct way to do this.

From the console in the back of the sanctuary the Aux send is sent to the stage where it terminates into XLR and 1/4" TRS connectors.  From the stage box TRS jack I have a 1/4" TS cable going to amp.  Should this cable be a TRS rather than TS to the amp?  How do I know what type of jack is on the amp?  It is an old Peavey. 


My real question is that I want to send the same mix to both the amplifier and to a personal powered keyboard monitor.  This is the path that I have planned:

stagebox TRS >>> TRS splitter >>> One side, TRS cable to input on powered monitor >>> other side to input on amp.

OR

Stagebox TRS >>> amp . . . .Then Stagebox parallel XLR >>> Powered monitor


 
General question:

1)  What happens when you plug a 1/4" mono TS plug into a balance mono TRS jack?  Does it get the same signal just no longer balanced?



I know this may seem confusing, I will try to answer any reply questions as soon as possible.
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Jordan Wolf

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Re: 1/4" TS and TRS Question?
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2011, 12:22:05 pm »

How do I know what type of jack is on the amp?  It is an old Peavey.
You can check here, or you can wait until someone responds...who knows, they might have designed the thing.

Quote
My real question is that I want to send the same mix to both the amplifier and to a personal powered keyboard monitor...

stagebox TRS >>> TRS splitter >>> One side, TRS cable to input on powered monitor >>> other side to input on amp.

OR

Stagebox TRS >>> amp . . . .Then Stagebox parallel XLR >>> Powered monitor
From the sound of it, either should work.  Most modern amplifiers have their own parallel outputs that you could use, but your amp may not have them.  Once you find out what the model is, you can determine that.

Quote
General question:

1)  What happens when you plug a 1/4" mono TS plug into a balance mono TRS jack?  Does it get the same signal just no longer balanced?
Well, the Ring and Shield (Pins 3 and 1) will be shorted together.  This may or may not be a problem; if the input is capable able to adapt to both balanced AND unbalanced cable types (even though it's the circuitry that determines if a circuit is balanced), you would probably just lose 6dB of gain and the robustness of the balanced connection.  If it's a short enough cable run and there aren't a lot of other cables lying next to, it''s probably fine.

Have you had any problems because of the current setup?
« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 12:39:44 pm by Jordan Wolf »
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Jordan Wolf
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: 1/4" TS and TRS Question?
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2011, 12:50:16 pm »

I have a question as to what would happen or what would be the correct way to do this.

From the console in the back of the sanctuary the Aux send is sent to the stage where it terminates into XLR and 1/4" TRS connectors.  From the stage box TRS jack I have a 1/4" TS cable going to amp.  Should this cable be a TRS rather than TS to the amp?  How do I know what type of jack is on the amp?  It is an old Peavey. 
If it's an "old" peavey it's probably TS, but my idea of old and yours may not be the same.

If you mix TS with TRS/XLR interfaces you imbalance it and may introduce hum issues over distance. "Old" Peavey amps also had optional input transformers.

Quote

My real question is that I want to send the same mix to both the amplifier and to a personal powered keyboard monitor.  This is the path that I have planned:

stagebox TRS >>> TRS splitter >>> One side, TRS cable to input on powered monitor >>> other side to input on amp.

OR

Stagebox TRS >>> amp . . . .Then Stagebox parallel XLR >>> Powered monitor


A hardwire split mixing TS with TRS/XLR will imbalance it... for short distance maybe OK, maybe not.
Quote
General question:

1)  What happens when you plug a 1/4" mono TS plug into a balance mono TRS jack?  Does it get the same signal just no longer balanced?

The TS signal can only be single ended. If you plug into a TRS balanced output jack, you results can vary depending on the output circuit design. Plugging TS into a TRS input will generally work fine, while perhaps having a little more hum.
Quote


I know this may seem confusing, I will try to answer any reply questions as soon as possible.

You need to know the specifics of your gear, and/or experiment to see how it acts.

JR
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Jacob Robinson

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Re: 1/4" TS and TRS Question?
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2011, 01:00:31 pm »

The amp is a Peavey M4000 the manual is here.  http://www.peavey.com/assets/literature/manuals/80300635.pdf I did read that the inputs are paralleled to be used as an output also, but I still don't know if it is TS or TRS.  All it says is 1/4"
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: 1/4" TS and TRS Question?
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2011, 01:06:43 pm »

TS

I suspect there may be a few ohms between Shield and chassis ground, but definitely not balanced.

JR
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