ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5]   Go Down

Author Topic: New church plant sound setup  (Read 11042 times)

TJ (Tom) Cornish

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4148
  • St. Paul, MN
Re: New church plant sound setup
« Reply #40 on: August 08, 2011, 05:05:43 pm »

Based on your reaction, I think it is a safe bet I should say no deal.   ;)  So it sound like they are not 220's.
Correct.  The reason they're a twist lock connector is so that folks don't mistake them for regular outlets and plug things that shouldn't be dimmed into them.  My big tipoff is that there are several next to each other. 

Even if they were 220v, you couldn't use them anyway, since you need 4 conductors, not 3 - two hots, a neutral, and a ground.  3-wire 220 volt circuits are only suitable for devices that don't require splitting it to 120v power, such as a large motor.

It's pretty rare for a school auditorium to have heavy temporary power - not that many people bring in distro equipment to venues like that.  Hopefully you can find enough separate wall circuits to get what you need.
Logged

Jeremy Johnston

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
Re: New church plant sound setup
« Reply #41 on: August 08, 2011, 06:23:08 pm »

OK, I'm a little late to this game, but as a church TD and looking at how people use things and what the needs really are for church - I have to ask if you really NEED wireless IEM or two wireless mics?  If the drummer went wired IEM, you would save several hundred dollars. If you could do with ONLY the pastor on wireless mic, you'd save several hundred more.

No matter what, the loudspeaker system is MOST important - EVERYTHING else can be changed easily, but getting good coverage, particularly in poor acoustic environments that you can't change, loudspeakers trump almost everything else.  POWER is important to, but these days, amplifiers and powered loudspeakers are so efficient that you can usually do the size of events you describe on the average house circuits.

Don't skimp on loudspeakers. Go WIRED where ever you can. No batteries (fewer anyway) and no wireless frequency coordination to bother with. Wired is more reliable, cheaper and better sounding for the dollar than wireless in almost every case.

JJ
TD
KCC
Logged

Aaron Fisk

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 22
Re: New church plant sound setup
« Reply #42 on: August 08, 2011, 08:25:04 pm »

OK, I'm a little late to this game, but as a church TD and looking at how people use things and what the needs really are for church - I have to ask if you really NEED wireless IEM or two wireless mics?  If the drummer went wired IEM, you would save several hundred dollars. If you could do with ONLY the pastor on wireless mic, you'd save several hundred more.

No matter what, the loudspeaker system is MOST important - EVERYTHING else can be changed easily, but getting good coverage, particularly in poor acoustic environments that you can't change, loudspeakers trump almost everything else.  POWER is important to, but these days, amplifiers and powered loudspeakers are so efficient that you can usually do the size of events you describe on the average house circuits.

Don't skimp on loudspeakers. Go WIRED where ever you can. No batteries (fewer anyway) and no wireless frequency coordination to bother with. Wired is more reliable, cheaper and better sounding for the dollar than wireless in almost every case.

JJ
TD
KCC

Thanks for the great ideas.  I have dropped the wireless IEM's for the drummer and am going to get a personal headphone amp for him.  I talked to the pastor today and we may get one (at most two) wireless mics.  The thoughts was one handheld and one earset, but if we needed we could get by with one. 

My thoughts are shifting to powered wedge monitors.  Here is my current idea (sorry, it has shifted a number of times, as I learn more about my space and needs) two EV ZX1a's for the vocalist / acoustic guitars and two EV ELX 112a's for the electric guitars and bass.  I could do four of either one, but I like the light weight of the zx1a's and the lower frequency response of the 112a's  Maybe I am way off base here, but that is my current thought for the monitoring.
Logged

Brad Weber

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2209
  • Marietta, GA
Re: New church plant sound setup
« Reply #43 on: August 09, 2011, 08:41:52 am »

The fact that the twist locks are labeled 59, 60 , 61 and 62 also suggests they are probably dimmed circuits with the labeling indicating the corresponding circuit number.

My thoughts are shifting to powered wedge monitors.  Here is my current idea (sorry, it has shifted a number of times, as I learn more about my space and needs) two EV ZX1a's for the vocalist / acoustic guitars and two EV ELX 112a's for the electric guitars and bass.  I could do four of either one, but I like the light weight of the zx1a's and the lower frequency response of the 112a's  Maybe I am way off base here, but that is my current thought for the monitoring.
That is one reason I asked about stage power.  If power exists near where you need it then powered speakers may be a good solution, but if you have to run power all over the stage and/or have limited power at the stage then they powered monitors not be the best approach.

The receptacles in the pictures look like 15A rather than 20A receptacles but the two duplexes on the stage could be wired with all four outlets on one circuit, one circuit per duplex or one circuit per receptacle.  You're apparently going to be power everything on stage from those including not only the powered monitors but also the two PRX615 mains and any PRX618S-XLF powered sub(s) you want to add, all the instruments, any props or music stand lights and anything else you have on stage.  It looks like you need to look in detail at both whether you have sufficient power available at the stage and how you'll distribute that power to everything on stage since things like plugging one plug strip into another plug strip are prohibited by NEC.  You might want to check with the facilities people there at the school to find out in more detail what you actually have for available power on the stage before making any final decisions.
Logged

Aaron Fisk

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 22
Re: New church plant sound setup
« Reply #44 on: August 09, 2011, 05:33:09 pm »

OK, so this in the information I found out from the school today.  There are 20-amp circuits on each side of the stage and each is on a separate breaker.  We also have a 440 cable available in the upstairs area above the stage that can be provided, if needed.  Would that be sufficient for the following?
- JBL PRX615M (2) Mains
- JBL PRX618s-xlf (s) Subs
- EV ZX1A (3) Monitors
- EV ELX115p (1) Bass Monitor
Logged

Brad Weber

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2209
  • Marietta, GA
Re: New church plant sound setup
« Reply #45 on: August 09, 2011, 06:14:31 pm »

OK, so this in the information I found out from the school today.  There are 20-amp circuits on each side of the stage and each is on a separate breaker.  We also have a 440 cable available in the upstairs area above the stage that can be provided, if needed.  Would that be sufficient for the following?
- JBL PRX615M (2) Mains
- JBL PRX618s-xlf (s) Subs
- EV ZX1A (3) Monitors
- EV ELX115p (1) Bass Monitor
I believe the PRX615M and PRX618S-XLF are rated at a maximum of 5A each, so those will pretty much take all of one circuit, or half the circuit on each side, if you run them hard.  The monitors do not draw nearly as much, maybe 3A total from what I can tell.  However, don't forget that you are also likely powering amps, keyboards, etc. on stage as well as if you ever add a projector or anything like that.  So you may be okay with the two 20A circuits, but you may want to be careful in how you distribute the power so that you don't end up with too much on either single circuit.
Logged

Jonathan Johnson

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2907
  • Southwest Washington (state, not DC)
Re: New church plant sound setup
« Reply #46 on: August 12, 2011, 10:06:35 pm »

The only thing that we can know for certain about the twist-lock receptacles is the rating of the receptacle. There will be a NEMA code on the face of the receptacle, decipher it here. Note that this page may not include all NEMA configurations.

As others have posted, do not assume that these are always live, connected directly from the electrical panel. Verify with the house technician before using. Connecting your sound system to a dimmer panel may be a bad thing.
Logged
Stop confusing the issue with facts and logic!
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5]   Go Up
 


Page created in 0.037 seconds with 21 queries.