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Author Topic: 16:9 vs 4:3  (Read 3654 times)

Kristian Stevenson

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16:9 vs 4:3
« on: December 14, 2008, 09:24:37 pm »

We have just bought a 9'x16' outdoor screen and are looking into a projector to match. i posted a previous topic about this but now i have a different question. We will be using the projector in our youth room with a 150" 4:3 screen when we arent using it for this outdoor movie screen. I am thinking about going with the 16:9 projector and just raising the screen up a little in the youthroom to make it a "wide screen". The other option is to get a 4:3 projector and turn it on 16:9 mode which will make me have to jack the zoom up to get that 16x9 image to cover the whole movie screen which could ruin the brightness and detail. what do yaw think?

The projectors i am looking at:

16x9:
http://www.projectorcentral.com/Optoma-TWR1693.htm

4x3:
http://www.projectorcentral.com/Optoma-TXR774.htm

thanks,
Kristian

ps: And if anyone nows of a good, brighter, higher contrast WXGA projector under $5000 let me know. if that would be the route I should take
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Kristian Stevenson

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2008, 09:40:34 pm »

Also I will be needing some good quality coax and HD15 to coax adapters for the projecotr when it is in our youth room. About 100' of it. Anyone have suggestions on brands and places to buy??

Right now Ive got 100' of junk I got off ebay for 20 bucks sending signal to the current projector out of the FSR CDA-4 and the picture quality looks aweful, so I want to do it right with this new projector.

thanks again,
Kristian
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Karl P(eterson)

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2008, 02:10:43 pm »

I would go with a Panasonic PT-DW5100U. These are great, quite and have RGBHV terminals right on them. Do be aware that this projector will only be useable at dusk/night time as it is nowhere near enough power to use during the day, but at 5500 lumens it would be the best you can do for (right at) 5K (if you look).

In keeping with the above recommendation I would recommend buying a 16x9 projector and putting it into 4:3 mode when needed. That, to me, is a better compromise than using a 4:3 in 16:9.....

Karl P
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Kristian Stevenson

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2008, 04:15:24 pm »

ok thats what i needed to know. But yes this movie screen was meant for nightime movie events. I really like that panasonic, i found it brand new on ebay for $5049. Any ideas on good coax then??
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Brad Weber

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2008, 09:58:52 am »

Kristian Stevenson wrote on Mon, 15 December 2008 16:15

I really like that panasonic, i found it brand new on ebay for $5049.

From an authorized dealer?  Many manufacturers' warranties and support may not apply if you don't purchase the equipment from an authorized dealer.

As far as adapters and cable, would it be HD15 at the source and RGBHV on 5 BNCs at the projector?  Would the cable be run on the floor or in conduit or might it run through a plenum space?
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Brad Weber
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Kristian Stevenson

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2008, 11:14:01 pm »

heres the projector on ebay...
http://cgi.ebay.com/Panasonic-PTDW5100U-PT-DW5100U-DLP-HDTV- Projector-NEW_W0QQitemZ270307979113QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_Def aultDomain_0?hash=item270307979113&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14& amp;_trkparms=72%3A1205%7C66%3A2%7C65%3A12%7C39%3A1%7C240%3A 1318%7C301%3A1%7C293%3A1%7C294%3A50

As for cable, yes i need one HD15 adapter for the coax and it would run along the floor then up a wall and across the ceiling to the projector. all right against steel trusses if that makes any difference.
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Karl P(eterson)

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2008, 11:49:38 pm »

Check your pm.

There are real dealers who can help you for the same price.

Karl P
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Brad Weber

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2008, 05:59:38 am »

Kristian Stevenson wrote on Tue, 16 December 2008 23:14

heres the projector on ebay...
 http://cgi.ebay.com/Panasonic-PTDW5100U-PT-DW5100U-DLP-HDTV-  Projector-NEW_W0QQitemZ270307979113QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_Def  aultDomain_0?hash=item270307979113&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14& amp;  amp;_trkparms=72%3A1205%7C66%3A2%7C65%3A12%7C39%3A1%7C240%3A 1318%7C301%3A1%7C293%3A1%7C294%3A50

The comment from that vendor that "All of our products are covered by a warranty of 1 years parts and 90 days for labor. Due to our very low low prices, we are prevented from listing our items with manufacturer warranty. Our products are the same as if you bought in stores." is a bit disconcerting, especially since Panasonic's warranty ( ftp://ftp.panasonic.com/pub/Panasonic/Drivers/PBTS/manuals/W T_DLP1.pdf) is 2 years parts and labor on the projector, 1 year parts and labor on the fan and 90 days (or 500 hours) on the lamp.  In fact, it appears the projector spec data shown in the referenced e-Bay listing was taken from Projector Central but the 2 year warranty shown there has been deleted in the e-Bay posting.

I also noted the comment in the e-Bay listing that "All products listed as NEW, are indeed NEW IN BOX items. We do not list items as NEW and ship REFURBISHED items." yet nothing for this particular item actually seems to identify it as new.

I would follow Karl's advice and look for someone who seems a more legitimate dealer.

Kristian Stevenson wrote on Tue, 16 December 2008 23:14

As for cable, yes i need one HD15 adapter for the coax and it would run along the floor then up a wall and across the ceiling to the projector.

The "across the ceiling" is what could be a factor if that above ceiling space is considered a plenum space, in which case you would probably have to use plenum rated cable.
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Brad Weber
muse Audio Video
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Kristian Stevenson

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2008, 10:11:32 pm »

All this RGBHV jargon is running together in my head...
Is this what I need with an HD15 Adapter for one end??
http://www.ramelectronics.net/audio-video/video-cables/hdtv- projector-cables/rgbhv-cables/rgbhv-cable-5-bnc-to-5-bnc-556 11/prod55611.html

And I think We are gonna go with the panasonic. And It comes to find out there are a little more funds available so I should be able to afford to buy from a reputable dealer...
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Brad Weber

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2008, 09:45:10 am »

Kristian Stevenson wrote on Wed, 17 December 2008 22:11

All this RGBHV jargon is running together in my head...
Is this what I need with an HD15 Adapter for one end??
 http://www.ramelectronics.net/audio-video/video-cables/hdtv-  projector-cables/rgbhv-cables/rgbhv-cable-5-bnc-to-5-bnc-556 11/prod55611.html

In general, yes.  RGBHV is using five separate wires to carry the video signal information, which allows for larger, lower loss cabling to be used than you find in typical VGA cabling.  These five separate cables are then bundled in one overall jacket for RGBHV or 5 wire cable.

However, I am never comfortable with cables that don't tell you anything about the product, such as the conductor size/gage, losses, rated use, etc.  Compare the cable you noted to the type of information provided here, http://www.extron.com/product/product.aspx?id=5condmhrbncmbn cmc&subtype=54 and in the specifications for the actual cable used in those found here http://www.extron.com/product/product.aspx?id=bnc5mhrcable&a mp;subtype=260.  I'm not saying that is the right cable for your application, but it is an example of a well defined product.  As to why this makes a difference, look at http://www.extron.com/product/listbytype.aspx?subtype=54, you see three different general types of 5 wire cable that differ significantly in the cable used and the related performance and cost, including one version that is plenum rated (MHR-5P), which is required by code if the cable is run exposed in a plenum area.
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Brad Weber
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Arnold B. Krueger

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2008, 10:27:01 am »

Kristian Stevenson wrote on Thu, 18 December 2008 03:11

All this RGBHV jargon is running together in my head...



RGBHV just means breaking out the tiny coax that is actually in a typical HD15 cable so that you can interface it with individual cables that have far lower loss over long distances.

The usual cable of choice for long distance RGBHV is quad shielded RG6 with the largest possible solid copper center conductor, which is usually 18 gauge. You may have to look around to avoid a cable with a steel core.

Most better video splitter and distribution amps have some selectable gain to partially overcome line losses, but long runs of HD15 cable have so much loss that it is hard to overcome.

Quote:


Is this what I need with an HD15 Adapter for one end??
 http://www.ramelectronics.net/audio-video/video-cables/hdtv-  projector-cables/rgbhv-cables/rgbhv-cable-5-bnc-to-5-bnc-556 11/prod55611.html



Interesting - same ad and source that I ordered my RBGHV adapters from. The key is to make the adaptor cables as short as is reasaonbly possible (usually 6') so that you get the video into the RGBHV low-loss RG6 cables.  

Make sure that each of the 5 cables is as exactly the same length. I laid out my RGBHV cable package in the longest hallway in the church, and also checked the length markers on the RG6 cable to ensure that each cable was the same length within a few inches.

Compression BNC connectors are probably the easiest to use for termination. You'll probably end up with a handful of gender menders in the system because the BNC connectors tend to be just one sex.

Also, if you run the cable in a drop ceiling, or attic, make sure that the cable is plenum rated. Otherwise, put it into steel conduit. Conduit is pretty easy to work with if you can avoid having to bend it.
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Brad Weber

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2008, 12:35:07 pm »

Arnold B. Krueger wrote on Thu, 18 December 2008 10:27

Most better video splitter and distribution amps have some selectable gain to partially overcome line losses, but long runs of HD15 cable have so much loss that it is hard to overcome.

Some RGBHV DAs do have output gain adjustments but I believe that most VGA distribution amplifiers are fixed unity gain devices.  Also, be careful not to confuse peaking or equalization with gain.  Peaking or cable equalization/compensation adjustments can help offset that losses over long runs are greater at higher frequencies and are often sufficient for reasonable length runs with good cable but they are not an overall gain adjustment.

Unless you really want or need to have a custom length cable or cannot install a pre-terminated cable due to the size of the connectors and how the cable has to run or other limitations, then a pre-terminated cable makes more sense than trying to terminate the cable yourself.  Not only can termination equipment be expensive, but you also need to use the right connectors for that particular cable and so on, unless you terminate cables on a regular basis it is usually easier and less expensive to use pre-terminated cable.
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Brad Weber
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Kristian Stevenson

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2008, 07:25:27 pm »

Yeah My DA is the FSR CDA-4 which has an adjustable gain on it. I am going to have to run the cable across the ceiling along a steel truss so I gues I need the plenum cable. I would like to find a good deal but I also want the picture to look nice so if you guys could point me to 100' of "good" 5-wire plenum, pre-terminated cable witht eh BNC ends, that would be helpful because me searching around google for the best deals often yields some crappy results...lol
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Brian Kent Tennyson

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #13 on: December 19, 2008, 11:00:20 am »

Find  reputable dealer and he can probably make up the cable you need out of his stock. If not he can order it from Liberty Wire for you, at whatever length you need. Cable is NOT an area you want to go cheap on.

remember if the cable is to long you can always coil it, but you can't stretch it if it's to short.
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Kristian Stevenson

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Re: 16:9 vs 4:3
« Reply #14 on: December 19, 2008, 10:43:45 pm »

yeah i am sure that 100ft is long enough. thats what we've got running to it now and it is a little too long. But i don't think 75' will cut it.
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