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Author Topic: Lavalier vs handheld  (Read 574 times)

Dave Pluke

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Re: Lavalier vs handheld
« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2018, 04:07:30 pm »

Not exactly unobtrusive. And I can't vouch for it -- it was just what I found when I did a search.

Reminds me of the old sportcasters using Shure Commando mics hung around the neck by a shoelace (or similar support).

Quote from: Stephen Swaffer
My surprise in this case was how much better the handheld in the shirt pocket sounded than I ever have gotten a lavalier to sound-even a directional lavalier.

I wonder how much of that might be due to sheer size of element/diaphragm?

Dave

EDIT:  Everything old is new again:

« Last Edit: July 05, 2018, 04:13:36 pm by Dave Pluke »
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Mike Caldwell

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Re: Lavalier vs handheld
« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2018, 08:39:03 am »

This is most of the issue-a huge part of what I fight is that an extremely high percentage of visiting speakers will start out with a bit of chit chat to get comfortable-that is usually soft-then when they start their message which they have prepared and are comfortable with their volume goes up a couple notches.  The problem for me is this preliminary chat time is when I need to get it set for that speaker.  (OK-I know it should be set ahead of time-but getting that done is a battle I haven't won for 25 years and isn't likely to change soon).


To be honest having the presenter kick it up a little when they get into the presentation would not be a problem for me. I would consider it a good problem to have to re adjust for some who is actually speaking up and projecting.


This is what I really meant to say in my original message
But I think you figured out what I was going for, yes I need to proof read before posting!
"Is it just me or are people speaking softer these days when they do a presentation."
« Last Edit: July 06, 2018, 08:42:30 am by Mike Caldwell »
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Lavalier vs handheld
« Reply #12 on: July 06, 2018, 12:43:44 pm »

I would agree-and for years I have gotten along fine.  I just learned to be patient and let it come together.  Now another piece of tech is coming into play in an annoying way.  This last week, while working through things-knowing it was "okay but not great" and working on getting little more-the pastor's phone got "blown up" by text messages saying "we can't hear" so he punted and went to the pulpit mic-which was OK when the speaker stayed at the pulpit-not so much when he backed away.  Experience in this room tells me it would have been fine and better with the lavalier-but what good is experience?  I found out one of the people saying it was too quiet was standing in the back corner of our auditorium-well outside of the speaker coverage and a spot we can't cover without creating other problems.

Jonathan, one other thing that probably came into play sometime around when the first speakers were added was air conditioning.  Take a building that wasn't made for either amplified sound or AC and try to fit both into the building and you have dueling technologies.  It's amazing how loud AC is when there just isn't space to design the AC to be somewhat quiet.
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Steve Swaffer

Mike Caldwell

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Re: Lavalier vs handheld
« Reply #13 on: July 06, 2018, 06:36:49 pm »


Jonathan, one other thing that probably came into play sometime around when the first speakers were added was air conditioning.  Take a building that wasn't made for either amplified sound or AC and try to fit both into the building and you have dueling technologies.  It's amazing how loud AC is when there just isn't space to design the AC to be somewhat quiet.

I work in a couple of newer schools in their gyms and the noise the HVAC systems is crazy. One has an air return system that runs all the
time filling the gym with a droning 200hz, the other cycles on and off and sounds like a jet winding up for take off at least twice during every event I'm in there for, perfect background for the elementary kids choir concert. 

Ken Cross

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Re: Lavalier vs handheld
« Reply #14 on: July 14, 2018, 12:35:21 am »

I've had great luck with Countryman ear worn mics. The closer you get the mic to the sound source (mouth) the greater acoustic gain you can get before feedback.
A mic worn at the corner of the mouth can have fantastic gain without feedback. The Countryman mic all by itself is near $280 - $400 depending on which model you choose. There are however lots of other brands these days. The biggest issues I've seen with them are when someone wears glasses they tend to not stay in place. To help this have them remove the glasses, install the mic and then return the glasses. The second issue is they are a bit delicate. The wires are tiny. Be careful with them.

Ken
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Lavalier vs handheld
« Reply #15 on: July 14, 2018, 09:25:44 pm »

I have a couple of Countryman E6s & dPA fine's at my disposal.  OP was not about how to get good hands free sound.

Frankly, I was curious if mic element size played a role-perhaps affecting my choice or decision to try a different lavalier.

There are those in our "circle" that are opposed to headset/ earworn mics- many opposed lavaliers a couple decades ago.  Admittedly irrational- but a product of some who allowed technology to change them.  This was a unique situation where a physical impediment made a handheld impractical- at the same time making it awkward for someone unfamiliar or uncomfortable with a earworn mic to be introduced to one.

In this application, seeing the lavalier is imaterial.  if a larger lavalier can-because of the physics involved- perform better, then I would like to pursue that option.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2018, 09:50:38 pm by Stephen Swaffer »
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