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Author Topic: Question on wiring up quad boxes  (Read 2219 times)

Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Question on wiring up quad boxes
« Reply #20 on: June 21, 2018, 08:41:10 pm »

So, I've wondered the same thing.  Here is what I found and from my experience it makes sense.  If you trim the strands, then how do you know the strands that were cut are carrying their fair share of current?  After all, the reason for using 10 gauge is to reduce voltage drop.  Yes the strands are in contact-loose contact. I have seen many many examples of wire with a film of corrosion all but isolating the individual strands.  If you trim at both ends, unless you trim exactly the same strands, you could even end up with wire less than 12 gauge that actually has a solid compression connection on both ends.
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Question on wiring up quad boxes
« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2018, 10:23:18 pm »

Hey Tim,

I'm not saying use any wire nuts, I was saying take your 10ga H N G coming in the box and snip a few strands off each one so it is essentially becomes a 12ga wire at the receptacle. In my mind this seems like a better and safer way than adding more connections and crowding the box with the Wago 221's. I realize this may not be code but am I missing something in my thinking that "theoretically" it would be better?

"Snipping a few strands" is a violation of Code, IIRC.
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"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Question on wiring up quad boxes
« Reply #22 on: June 22, 2018, 02:01:52 am »

So, I've wondered the same thing.  Here is what I found and from my experience it makes sense.  If you trim the strands, then how do you know the strands that were cut are carrying their fair share of current?  After all, the reason for using 10 gauge is to reduce voltage drop.  Yes the strands are in contact-loose contact. I have seen many many examples of wire with a film of corrosion all but isolating the individual strands.  If you trim at both ends, unless you trim exactly the same strands, you could even end up with wire less than 12 gauge that actually has a solid compression connection on both ends.

That's what I wanted to say, but couldn't form the words correctly.

If a crimp connector is acceptable to local codes, it seems to me that trimming a few strands, then slipping a crimp ferrule over the whole strand bundle (where not trimmed) and crimping would be better than even using a butt splice to join two different wire gauges. It would certainly provide better conductivity between strands than leaving it loose.

But, as has been pointed out many times before, unorthodox solutions are still a code violation, even if superior.
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Lyle Williams

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Re: Question on wiring up quad boxes
« Reply #23 on: June 22, 2018, 06:09:37 am »

Can you get outlets that accept 10ga wire?

(Asks the guy on the other side of the planet)

If yes, why not use them?  If no... what does that tell you?
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Kevin Graf

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Re: Question on wiring up quad boxes
« Reply #24 on: June 22, 2018, 09:52:52 am »

Almost all good US dual receptacles are rates for 10AWG wire. But that's probably for in-wall solid or course strand wire, not flexible cord fine strand wire.

Note that contrary to what some manufactures label their products, you plug into a receptacle and mount that receptacle in an outlet box.
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Frank DeWitt

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Re: Question on wiring up quad boxes
« Reply #25 on: June 23, 2018, 08:39:32 pm »

strip about  1 1/4 in of wire,  seerate the strands into two bundles.  Don't cut any off.  Every duplex outlet I know of has two screws for hot and two for neutral so use both screws, one for each half of the strands.

Full current carrying cap,  no strands left out.  Probably not to code, but still better then a wire nut and pig tail.
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Question on wiring up quad boxes
« Reply #26 on: June 23, 2018, 09:22:42 pm »

strip about  1 1/4 in of wire,  seerate the strands into two bundles.  Don't cut any off.  Every duplex outlet I know of has two screws for hot and two for neutral so use both screws, one for each half of the strands.

Full current carrying cap,  no strands left out.  Probably not to code, but still better then a wire nut and pig tail.

Nope, not Code compliant.
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"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

John Schalk

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Re: Question on wiring up quad boxes
« Reply #27 on: June 24, 2018, 09:27:03 am »

Can you get outlets that accept 10ga wire?

(Asks the guy on the other side of the planet)

If yes, why not use them?  If no... what does that tell you?

I am using the mil-spec receptacles that were sold with my OA Windsor quad boxes.  10ga THHN wire goes in easily, but the finer strands in the conductors of my SO cord is another story.  Since I have the big red wire nuts on hand I plan to wire up the remaining box with them for now, but the Wago tab connectors look like the way to go for future projects.  Who knows, I might order some and find the motivation to re-wire these quad boxes.
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Question on wiring up quad boxes
« Reply #28 on: June 24, 2018, 10:46:22 am »

I am using the mil-spec receptacles that were sold with my OA Windsor quad boxes.  10ga THHN wire goes in easily, but the finer strands in the conductors of my SO cord is another story.  Since I have the big red wire nuts on hand I plan to wire up the remaining box with them for now, but the Wago tab connectors look like the way to go for future projects.  Who knows, I might order some and find the motivation to re-wire these quad boxes.

The other method I've seen is to use fork or ring crimp-on terminals on the wire.
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"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

Frank Koenig

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Re: Question on wiring up quad boxes
« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2018, 11:35:30 am »

10ga THHN wire goes in easily, but the finer strands in the conductors of my SO cord is another story.

If the receptacle accepts 10 AWG solid it will accept 10 AWG stranded -- it just takes a little patience. Do a good clean strip (no nicked strands),  give the wire a hard twist but not so hard as to cause strands to jump out of their position in the lay, and trim the end with a flush cutter. Twist the end again to fix any crushing by the flush cutter. The wire should be a perfect little rope with a square end. With good light and steady hands aim for the center of the hole without touching the sides. If there is a wayward strand, pull out, twist, and try again. Once you get them all in, lightly tighten the clamp to keep them from escaping. After all wires are inserted in their respective clamps go around and take all the clamps to final torque. Give every wire a hard pull and wiggle to test the connection and relieve stress. Re-torque the clamps. As has been discussed many times here, resist the temptation to tin the wire.

-Frank
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