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Author Topic: Finally working on them  (Read 1313 times)

Mark Cadwallader

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Re: Finally working on them
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2018, 11:15:54 pm »

Mechanical/machinist geek question: Will you machine curve-bottomed nuts for the slots, or make dished, rectangular washers for the nuts to bear against?
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Chris Grimshaw

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Re: Finally working on them
« Reply #21 on: June 13, 2018, 04:39:35 am »

Dave, I don't know if you're still looking for test subjects or if you're just selling them now, but please PM me with how much it'd be to get a set or two to the UK.

They look great.

Cheers,
Chris
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Brian Bolly

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Re: Finally working on them
« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2018, 08:04:00 am »

Next installment.
Speaker spuds will be pressed and bolted into the tops after anodizing.
Groove is for possible anti rattle o-ring.

Dave, those look really nice. What is the diameter of the spud?
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David Allred

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Re: Finally working on them
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2018, 09:51:53 am »

The photo is of the bottom side of the top half of the adjustment mechanism.
They will go from 4 degrees to 12 degrees in 2 degree increments.
I'm working on the bottom now.
Then the post and socket.
For now the adjusting will happen before the installation, but later I will have a doodad that will allow you to adjust in place.
Rotation center should be good for 12" and 15" two-ways.
Not as fancy as the BT, but lower profile and less expensive.
Here's an earlier solid model.

It there a tongue on the bottom piece to maintain alignment or just relying on the pair of locking screws.
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Debbie Dunkley

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Re: Finally working on them
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2018, 10:21:48 am »

Regardless of how the finished product will perform, that machining is beautiful!

Dave

I agree - nice job Dave.
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Dave Garoutte

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Re: Finally working on them
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2018, 12:02:08 pm »

David A,
The 'splines' keep everything straight.
The through bolts will control the side to side play.
The center slot if for a future feature.

Brian B,
I checked every speaker I have and ended up with 1.39" diameter for the spud.
Depending on the response from beta testing, it could be reduced.
It's definitely a pain when they are too tight.

Mark C,
I will make special cylindrical section 'washers' that fit the slots for full contact and anti rotation.
They'll press onto a flathead allen bolt.
I considered making the entire bolt, but decided it was way to difficult (expensive).

« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 03:55:47 pm by Dave Garoutte »
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Dave Garoutte

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Re: Finally working on them
« Reply #26 on: June 17, 2018, 07:31:31 pm »

Here's the next installment; the bottom saddle plate.

I may take a video of the machining and yootoob it.
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Jason Glass

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Re: Finally working on them
« Reply #27 on: June 17, 2018, 08:30:31 pm »

Here's the next installment; the bottom saddle plate.

I may take a video of the machining and yootoob it.

Hi Dave,

Gorgeous machine work! I love the smell of aluminum chips in the morning.

Why are the stepped cogs necessary? These parts are practicaly identical (minus cogs), in practical function, to the polar alignment altitude angle segment plates on a Mountain Instruments MI-250 equatorial telescope mount, which is conservatively rated for a 150 lb. dynamic load.  Believe me, I loaded mine up on several occasions and the thing was wonderfully rigid. You might be able to shave off a lot of machining time and cost with smooth mating surfaces while allowing for infinitely fine angle adjustment and still have rock-solid engagement for the semi-static load of a speaker. I'd love to know your thoughts on this and if you've experienced a firsthand necessity for such deeply engaged parts.

http://www.mi250.com/images/rocker.jpg

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: June 17, 2018, 08:40:32 pm by Jason Glass »
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Dave Garoutte

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Re: Finally working on them
« Reply #28 on: June 17, 2018, 09:03:38 pm »

It's mostly to make it easy to align them.
Actually, the smooth arc is much more finicky as to the mating fit.
Any variance will show up as wiggle.
The 'splines' on mine have a short straight section at the engagement interface which allows for some give in the profile.
The actual machining time would be very similar for an arc and the splines; only a few seconds difference.

I've done a fair amount of astronomy stuff.  Google 'Monolith portable pier'.  That's 100% my design and manufacture.
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Jason Glass

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Re: Finally working on them
« Reply #29 on: June 17, 2018, 09:17:30 pm »



It's mostly to make it easy to align them.
Actually, the smooth arc is much more finicky as to the mating fit.
Any variance will show up as wiggle.
The 'splines' on mine have a short straight section at the engagement interface which allows for some give in the profile.
The actual machining time would be very similar for an arc and the splines; only a few seconds difference.

I've done a fair amount of astronomy stuff.  Google 'Monolith portable pier'.  That's 100% my design and manufacture.

Holy crap! I KNEW that I recognized your name.  Cloudy Nights forums, right?  I have lusted after that pier for quite some time! My current portable pier is an ATS.  It's super rigid and damps uber quick, but damn, it's heavy to transport.  Ask me sometime about my Sorbothane Losmandy damping feet mods. My rig oscillates 1/2 wave, at most, with a hard slap to the aperture edge of the OTA, resting on stable ground.

Sorry to veer off-topic, guys. But Dave is a badass from another universe!

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

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