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Author Topic: Fun Interview with Jim Gamble  (Read 629 times)

Scott Holtzman

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Fun Interview with Jim Gamble
« on: April 17, 2018, 12:20:04 am »

Trippy interview,  I love when he scrolls through the massive bitmapped display and says "easy to use", still can't do this today.

https://www.namm.org/library/oral-history/jim-gamble

Reading the history books Jim was VP at Tycobrahe in the Caljam days. 

There are some photos on his site of this console out with Umphrey's Mcgee

Important to note (I did not get it at first) this is a remote controlled analog console.  No D/A conversion.

I can't image what it cost to build this thing. 

« Last Edit: April 17, 2018, 12:29:06 am by Scott Holtzman »
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Craig Leerman

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Re: Fun Interview with Jim Gamble
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2018, 03:58:21 am »

The Bob Lentini he refers to is the guy who invented the Software Audio Console SAC for live use and SAW for recording.

The SAC was a great idea for a console, offering up 15 or 16 different consoles off each input. One console and its outputs was used for FOH, and the rest of the consoles could each become a monitor mix complete with individual EQ and processing for every mix. The SAC also used plug-ins for effects and processing which was common for DAWs at the time but not for live use.

I think the problem with both SAC and Gamble was that live audio folks want faders and knobs and do not want to mix on a mouse.

The Speaker company Montarbo was developing a console a few years ago that ran the SAC software and gave the user faders and knobs but the guy spearheading the project now works for a different manufacturer so I guess the project is over. I saw a prototype and heard the price point and thought to myself that I could buy a name brand A level digital board for the kind of money that Montarbo was talking about.

I did see a guy running a SAC rig in Vegas. He used Behringer Midi Faders connected to the software so he had some hands on control.

The heaviest console I ever helped to lift was a Gamble EX56. One of the nicest analog boards but took 6 big guys just to move it.

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Riley Casey

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Re: Fun Interview with Jim Gamble
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2018, 10:31:09 am »

I like how the video editor decides it's time to bail when he starts talking about non-polarized capacitors.  ::)

John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Fun Interview with Jim Gamble
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2018, 10:39:51 am »

Jim Gable was involved in the early Crest Console program, and I had some interesting discussions with John Petrucelli (RIP) about Jim's later digitally controlled analog path designs.

This would be a little easier to do today with improved DPOT and digitally controlled mic preamps, but it lacks the flexibility of a soft digital path and control surface. This technology would be significantly more expensive for a fleeting (imaginary?) benefit.

JR 

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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Fun Interview with Jim Gamble
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2018, 01:30:52 pm »

Jim Gable was involved in the early Crest Console program, and I had some interesting discussions with John Petrucelli (RIP) about Jim's later digitally controlled analog path designs.

This would be a little easier to do today with improved DPOT and digitally controlled mic preamps, but it lacks the flexibility of a soft digital path and control surface. This technology would be significantly more expensive for a fleeting (imaginary?) benefit.

JR

Indeed, I read Craig's SAC article in LSI probably 15 years or more ago.  I agree on the automated console.  My interest was historical.  I did not realize what a legend Gamble was in the genesis of pro audio in the early 70's
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Andrew Broughton

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Re: Fun Interview with Jim Gamble
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2018, 05:36:16 pm »

I think the problem with both SAC and Gamble was that live audio folks want faders and knobs and do not want to mix on a mouse.
That's wasn't the whole problem. Most people don't know that around the same time, Soundcraft also had created a "digitally controlled analog console", except the SC had knobs and faders. It didn't sell either.
https://www.soundcraft.com/en/products/broadway
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Mike Caldwell

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Re: Fun Interview with Jim Gamble
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2018, 06:07:29 pm »

That's wasn't the whole problem. Most people don't know that around the same time, Soundcraft also had created a "digitally controlled analog console", except the SC had knobs and faders. It didn't sell either.
https://www.soundcraft.com/en/products/broadway

The Showco "Show Console" was also an early digitally controlled analog mixer built in collaboration between Showco and Harrison.

Here's some info on Tycobrahe and Jim Gamble.
http://www.gambleboards.com/jamtext.htm

Art Welter

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Re: Fun Interview with Jim Gamble
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2018, 07:13:36 pm »


Important to note (I did not get it at first) this is a remote controlled analog console.  No D/A conversion.

I can't image what it cost to build this thing.
As Jim said, "millions and millions for 10 consoles"- at least $200,000 a pop! And a market of near zero...
The average USA house (as in home, not console) price in 1994 was $154,500, and the great unwashed were buying "disposable" consoles like Yamaha PM 4000s for something like half that.

The latter digitally controlled analog Yamaha PM 5000 listed for $93,000 for 52 channels...

Art
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Fun Interview with Jim Gamble
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2018, 07:26:26 pm »

As Jim said, "millions and millions for 10 consoles"- at least $200,000 a pop! And a market of near zero...
The average USA house (as in home, not console) price in 1994 was $154,500, and the great unwashed were buying "disposable" consoles like Yamaha PM 4000s for something like half that.

The latter digitally controlled analog Yamaha PM 5000 listed for $93,000 for 52 channels...

Art

I was with a guy last night that was at Nelson Ledges in '92 and they had an analog Gamble console.  Crazy memories, raining cats and dogs trying to get a subset of the Allman Bros. on stage and reach Jim because the rotary switch that mapped the VCA's wasn't working right.

Funny I had barely heard this name mentioned before then comes from two different sources with 48 hours.

I do love the history.
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