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Author Topic: Question about Gooseneck mics  (Read 2656 times)

daledenton

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Question about Gooseneck mics
« on: March 28, 2018, 01:02:46 pm »

Hey everyone! I work in AV on the east coast and we had a question about some gooseneck mics we use here. They are shure brand. We have seen in the past that there are people who sometimes cross 2 gooseneck mics in order to reduce the booming effect that they sometimes get. We do all the mixing with eq's but we noticed that those setups with two mics sometimes sound a bit more refined than just one mic. The question is, How do you connect too mics like that together without getting feedback from each other? we have tried multiple things but havent been able to get it fully working yet without feedback or massive popping. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
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Ray Aberle

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Re: Question about Gooseneck mics
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2018, 01:32:28 pm »

Hi Dale,

It sounds like there's something else causing problems, and not the microphones. I've used pairs of MX418 mics many times (including with political events; those HAVE to work PERFECTLY every time!!) and the mics themselves (and their interaction with/proximity to each other) don't cause feedback. Feedback is coming from somewhere else...

-Ray
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daledenton

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Re: Question about Gooseneck mics
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2018, 02:53:48 pm »

Hi Dale,

It sounds like there's something else causing problems, and not the microphones. I've used pairs of MX418 mics many times (including with political events; those HAVE to work PERFECTLY every time!!) and the mics themselves (and their interaction with/proximity to each other) don't cause feedback. Feedback is coming from somewhere else...

-Ray

Hmm we have tried making sure everything that would give feedback is taken care of but maybe we are forgetting something.. Any ideas as to what it could be? I know the list is pretty long hahaha but those are the same mic model we are using. Maybe it is our positioning of the mic heads themselves?
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Mac Kerr

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Re: Question about Gooseneck mics
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2018, 04:15:16 pm »

Hey everyone! I work in AV on the east coast and we had a question about some gooseneck mics we use here. They are shure brand. We have seen in the past that there are people who sometimes cross 2 gooseneck mics in order to reduce the booming effect that they sometimes get.
I have been putting dual GN mics on lecterns for more than 40 years, from the days of the dual SM57 vertical clip through AKG451s on VR tubes to AT857s to Countryman IsoMax. I have never considered reducing booming as a motivation for having dual mics, or for orienting them in a crossing pattern. Traditionally there are 2 mics on a lectern as a primary and backup. In cases where the mic's pattern is narrow and coverage needs to be wider using them in a splayed crossing orientations may provide the coverage needed.
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We do all the mixing with eq's but we noticed that those setups with two mics sometimes sound a bit more refined than just one mic. The question is, How do you connect too mics like that together without getting feedback from each other?
What is "mixing with eqs"? How does the dual mic setup sound "more refined"? For sure the 2 mic setup will display comb filtering artifacts if both mics are used at the same time. This would not be "more refined" to my ears.
Quote
we have tried multiple things but havent been able to get it fully working yet without feedback or massive popping. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Popping on plosives is very likely to happen on these types of mics, they are sensitive to it, the goosneck lets them be placed closer to the speaker's mouth where plosives are more prominent, and because of their small size they tend to have small fairly ineffective windscreens.

You avoid feedback with good system design, keeping the mics, particularly mics that require a lot of gain like lectern mics, out of the coverage of the PA. It can help to assign the lectern mics to a subgroup where you can do the radical eq you may need to help prevent feedback. It may also help with feedback, also with popping to not splay them, but using mics with appropriate coverage aim them directly upstage with both mics and their tiny windscreens inside another windscreen that contains both with airspace around them.

Use a single mic at a time, the second is a BU.

Mac
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Keith Broughton

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Re: Question about Gooseneck mics
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2018, 05:18:16 pm »

I find most lectern mics don't have proper windscreens.
If you watch any of the major awards shows, they don't use those teeny tiny filters as seen on Shure mics.
Stopping "popping" starts with a good wind screen and then some EQ and/or compression.
Stop the problem before it gets to the mixer.

As for the "booming effect" and the "more refined sound"... I really don't grasp what is meant ???

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Jordan Wolf

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Re: Question about Gooseneck mics
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2018, 08:53:57 pm »

+1 to everything the previous posters have said.

I prefer to stack my gooseneck capsules, compared to situating them side-by-side. When they’re so close (under 1/4”) you probably wouldn’t notice much phasing, but I also don’t recommend having both ON simultaneously.

Main & (standby) Backup it is.

My analog setup for automatic fail-over is a Shure SCM410 automixer with both mics going in, and the main out going to my main console. The automixer chooses which mic is “best”, and only opens that one since it is receiving relatively the same level from the same source. If one mic dies, the other one jumps right in. Works for me...
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Keith Broughton

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Re: Question about Gooseneck mics
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2018, 05:03:46 pm »

+1 to everything the previous posters have said.

I prefer to stack my gooseneck capsules, compared to situating them side-by-side. When they’re so close (under 1/4”) you probably wouldn’t notice much phasing, but I also don’t recommend having both ON simultaneously.

Main & (standby) Backup it is.


I like to do the same thing if 2 mics are required. Both capsules are under 1 windscreen.
Often I will route 1 mic to the main PA and the other to record or broadcast.
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