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Author Topic: First Attempt at Compression  (Read 2954 times)

Joe Pieternella

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Re: First Attempt at Compression
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2018, 12:57:43 am »




Some added good tools. 

http://www.rane.com/library.html
http://www.rane.com/note155.html

http://www.rane.com/note109.html
http://www.rane.com/note110.html

I can kinda understand Rane note 155 being linked even though it might make things (seem) very complicated if you're just starting with compression.

I don't quite see why 109 and 110 are added though?

Verstuurd vanaf mijn G8341 met Tapatalk

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Isaac South

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Re: First Attempt at Compression
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2018, 03:58:01 pm »

I had the opportunity this weekend to play around with the compression some more.  I'm starting to get more familiar with it.  But I realized I have a question:

The "gain" on my compressor (set at 3db) is supposed to be "make-up gain" correct?  So that when the signal reaches the dbu that I set it for, and it brings the signal down, it will add some gain to the signal so that the preachers volume doesn't get too low (when he's really pushing his voice and the crowd is getting with him).

But I also noticed, that this "gain" also increases his volume when he's got the mic pulled away from his mouth.  For example, with NO compression, when he pulls the mic away from his mouth, I lose him in the house.  But when I have the compression ON, and he pulls the mic away, it's like he's still there at the same volume and I don't lose him.

So my question (sorry so long):  Is this make-up gain also working at the bottom end of the volume as well as the top?  I'm sure I've used some incorrect wording here.  Hopefully you can decode what I'm trying to say.

Thank you.
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Mac Kerr

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Re: First Attempt at Compression
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2018, 04:14:44 pm »

I had the opportunity this weekend to play around with the compression some more.  I'm starting to get more familiar with it.  But I realized I have a question:

The "gain" on my compressor (set at 3db) is supposed to be "make-up gain" correct?  So that when the signal reaches the dbu that I set it for, and it brings the signal down, it will add some gain to the signal so that the preachers volume doesn't get too low (when he's really pushing his voice and the crowd is getting with him).

But I also noticed, that this "gain" also increases his volume when he's got the mic pulled away from his mouth.  For example, with NO compression, when he pulls the mic away from his mouth, I lose him in the house.  But when I have the compression ON, and he pulls the mic away, it's like he's still there at the same volume and I don't lose him.

So my question (sorry so long):  Is this make-up gain also working at the bottom end of the volume as well as the top?  I'm sure I've used some incorrect wording here.  Hopefully you can decode what I'm trying to say.

Thank you.

To use your terminology, the "Make up gain" increases the volume at the output of the compressor, it changes it at all levels. The compression does not reduce the level of the signal, it reduces the rate at which it increases. The output of the comp will increase less then the live volume of the voice will when it is in compression, and it will follow the level of the live voice when it is below the threshold and not in compression. Except in the unique instance of a dbx compressor in infinite compression mode the level will never go down when the input goes up.

Mac
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Isaac South

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Re: First Attempt at Compression
« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2018, 04:25:24 pm »

But when the preacher is just talking normal, and I increase that gain knob, his level goes up.  No matter if it's in compression or not.

At least that's what I'm hearing.  Am I just hearing stuff?
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: First Attempt at Compression
« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2018, 04:35:57 pm »

But when the preacher is just talking normal, and I increase that gain knob, his level goes up.  No matter if it's in compression or not.

At least that's what I'm hearing.  Am I just hearing stuff?

Go back and re-read Mac's comment.  He said nothing to contradict you - he was explaining WHY.

In a nutshell, the "make-up" gain is just *gain*.  It's there all the time; the functioning is not linked to the amount of compression being applied nor is it disabled when not in compression.
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: First Attempt at Compression
« Reply #15 on: February 20, 2018, 04:36:11 pm »

But when the preacher is just talking normal, and I increase that gain knob, his level goes up.  No matter if it's in compression or not.

At least that's what I'm hearing.  Am I just hearing stuff?

Nope, that's what Tim said.  It's gain.  Plain and simple.  If you compress the signal you lower it's apparent volume.  Make up gain allows you to maintain your gain staging yet keep the same relative volume.

It's just another gain stage, plain and simple.  Some people call it "free gain", as in it doesn't effect gain before feedback.  They are wrong.

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Geert Friedhof

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Re: First Attempt at Compression
« Reply #16 on: February 20, 2018, 04:37:25 pm »

No, you are not hearing stuff.

Consider the whole point of compression is to reduce the dynamics of a source. With very dynamic sources compression can easily reach 10dB, which also reduces your max output by 10dB. To make up for that lost 10dB you can use the make up gain, or, when your fader is long enough, the fader. You can't use the channel gain, because that sits before the compressor, and will give you red lights when overloaded.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2018, 04:42:10 pm by Geert Friedhof »
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Mac Kerr

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Re: First Attempt at Compression
« Reply #17 on: February 20, 2018, 04:37:41 pm »

But when the preacher is just talking normal, and I increase that gain knob, his level goes up.  No matter if it's in compression or not.

At least that's what I'm hearing.  Am I just hearing stuff?

That is what is supposed to happen. The make up gain increases (or decreases) the output level of the compressor.

Mac
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Mac Kerr

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Re: First Attempt at Compression
« Reply #18 on: February 20, 2018, 04:42:24 pm »

No, you are not hearing stuff.

Consider the whole point of compression is to reduce the dynamics of a source. With very dynamic sources compression can easily reach 10dB, which also reduces your output by 10dB. To make up for that lost 10dB you can use the make up gain, or, when your fader is long enough, the fader. You can't use the channel gain, because that sits before the compressor, and will give you red lights when overloaded.

Sort of. The output is not actually reduced, the gain is. The level still goes up, but by a reduced amount. The result is that the output of the compressor will go up a smaller amount than the input, but it will still go up. It is a small point, but easily misunderstood by someone new to compression.

Mac
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Geert Friedhof

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Re: First Attempt at Compression
« Reply #19 on: February 20, 2018, 04:45:28 pm »

Sort of. The output is not actually reduced, the gain is. The level still goes up, but by a reduced amount. The result is that the output of the compressor will go up a smaller amount than the input, but it will still go up. It is a small point, but easily misunderstood by someone new to compression.

Mac

Already edited. ;)
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