ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Down

Author Topic: Non-Tripod Speaker Stands  (Read 3634 times)

Paul G. OBrien

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 854
Re: Non-Tripod Speaker Stands
« Reply #20 on: February 14, 2018, 10:02:15 am »

The problem with steel is the shipping. 

Yes.. so avoid that if possible. I had a local to me metal supplier cut 24"x24" 1/4" plate steel baseplates complete with a hand hole on one side and 4 units cost less than a single aluminum base plate does. Each one of these baseplates weighs about 50lbs and that provides a very stable base for a moving head on a 6.5' section of 12" box truss.
Logged

Jay Barracato

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1897
  • Solomons, MD
Re: Non-Tripod Speaker Stands
« Reply #21 on: February 14, 2018, 10:04:23 am »

Something tips when the center of gravity goes past the tipping point (pivot point ) of the base.

Increasing stability is simply lowering the center of gravity or widening the base.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

Logged
Jay Barracato

Chris Hindle

  • SR Forums
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1311
  • Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Earth, Sol System,......
Re: Non-Tripod Speaker Stands
« Reply #22 on: February 14, 2018, 12:32:08 pm »

If the plate is a circle, it can be half the diameter and have the same stability.  A tripod tipping on two legs has half the base distance as a tripod tipping up on one leg (which never happens).

If you make a 5 foot circular plate, it is twice as stable as a tripod with a 5 foot spread.  It is also ridiculously large.

with a "load" a couple of feet high, maybe.
Supporting a 60 pound box, 6' in the air on a 2-1/2 foot base?
Not gonna happen.
Way too easy to nudge the center of balance over the edge of the plate. You know what happens next.....
Wasn't it Aristotle that is quoted as saying "Give me a lever long enough, and I'll move the world"
You'll have to make a balance of weight to diameter to get to a "safe" place.
Chris.
Logged
Ya, Whatever. Just throw a '57 on it, and get off my stage.

Scott Olewiler

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1026
  • Trust me, it will be loud enough.
    • 4th Street Sound
Re: Non-Tripod Speaker Stands
« Reply #23 on: February 14, 2018, 01:43:53 pm »

At 40-50 events/year, there should be money.  My gut feeling is you are not charging enough.  If the clients expect higher quality and you make the investment to deliver it, then they should pay more for it.

-Dennis

If Chris is doing 40-50 gigs a year at the prices on his website, and can't afford subs he needs to figure out where the money is going.
Logged
If you want to feel more Kick drum turn up the kick drum fader, not the damn subs.

Marc Sibilia

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 49
  • Princeton, New Jersey
Re: Non-Tripod Speaker Stands
« Reply #24 on: February 14, 2018, 01:58:40 pm »

with a "load" a couple of feet high, maybe.
Supporting a 60 pound box, 6' in the air on a 2-1/2 foot base?
Not gonna happen.


All I am saying is if you aren't comfortable using a 2 1/2 foot circular base, you should be equally uncomfortable with a 5 foot base tripod.  The 2 1/2 foot circle might even be better if it is heavier.  See the sketch below.
Logged

Chris Poynter

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 82
    • www.chrispoynter.ca
Re: Non-Tripod Speaker Stands
« Reply #25 on: February 14, 2018, 03:14:17 pm »

At 40-50 events/year, there should be money.  My gut feeling is you are not charging enough.  If the clients expect higher quality and you make the investment to deliver it, then they should pay more for it.

If Chris is doing 40-50 gigs a year at the prices on his website, and can't afford subs he needs to figure out where the money is going.

Not that it's reeeeeally anybody's business, but in 2017 I grossed approximately $45,000 for this part-time DJ thing. I spent about $10,000 of that on equipment upgrades, and plan to do about the same this year. I've already spent $3,000.

I teach elementary school part time as well, and the money I make in both jobs goes towards... let's see... the house we just bought... daycare for our two young children... food... etc., etc., etc.

I live in a small city (Victoria, BC, Canada) and I know the market quite well. I raised my prices by approximately 20% between 2016 and 2017, and plan on raising them a bit more this year. It's a balancing act, because the request I get most often from potential clients is "can we change anything with this package to make it a bit cheaper."

So yes... I could definitely purchase some nice 18" subs this year, but I also have to consider the fact that the vast majority of the venues I play already ask me to turn down the bass as it is, and I'm not going to be able to charge that much more for the extra bass.

Would I "like" to purchase some subs right now? Hell yes! But that isn't really what this thread is about!  :)
Logged
I'm a DJ but it's okay; I'm a smart one.

Chris Poynter

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 82
    • www.chrispoynter.ca
Re: Non-Tripod Speaker Stands
« Reply #26 on: February 14, 2018, 03:16:25 pm »

All I am saying is if you aren't comfortable using a 2 1/2 foot circular base, you should be equally uncomfortable with a 5 foot base tripod.  The 2 1/2 foot circle might even be better if it is heavier.  See the sketch below.

I didn't take physics in high school (I've always been more of a fine arts kinda guy) but in theory this makes sense!? I'm going to look into this more.
Logged
I'm a DJ but it's okay; I'm a smart one.

Dave Garoutte

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1148
  • San Rafael, CA
Re: Non-Tripod Speaker Stands
« Reply #27 on: February 14, 2018, 03:28:47 pm »

I didn't take physics in high school (I've always been more of a fine arts kinda guy) but in theory this makes sense!? I'm going to look into this more.

Of course, the tripod is only that tippy (technical term) at three points on the circle.  As the force is applied away from those directions, it gets more stable.
A circular base is equally tippy in all directions.
They should make quadropods.
Logged
Nothing can be made idiot-proof; only idiot resistant.

Events.  Stage, PA, Lighting and Backline rentals.
Chauvet dealer.
Inventor.

Rick Powell

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 718
Re: Non-Tripod Speaker Stands
« Reply #28 on: February 14, 2018, 03:41:13 pm »

One element of using a circular base is that it is very difficult to level on an uneven surface as compared to a tripod, especially a tripod with an adjustable leg such as the Global ST-132 that accounts for uneven surfaces.
Logged

Stephen Kirby

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2875
Re: Non-Tripod Speaker Stands
« Reply #29 on: February 14, 2018, 04:45:20 pm »

If you have the space in the trailer you might want to look for some really cheap smaller used subwoofers with pole mounts on Craigslist and repaint them. Might be cheaper that having something custom made and doesn't have big foot print. I found one today for $60.
I've had experience with speakers lighter than Chris' on 1-15 subs getting knocked over.  Very fortunately it happened at the corner of the stage where I was playing and I was able to reach out, catch it and pull it back upright without missing a beat.  But that was the last time I ever set up like that.  Played with it at home afterwards and was surprised how easy it was to knock over.  It's actually pretty scary.  Now it's sandbags on tripod stands.  It's fairly amazing how much force a staggering drunk can impart to a stand.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Up
 


Page created in 0.053 seconds with 24 queries.