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Author Topic: Run life from this power supply  (Read 505 times)

David Allred

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Run life from this power supply
« on: August 30, 2017, 12:26:37 pm »

My brother-in-law is asking this for a friend.  He has a bass (guitar) amp that he wants to use in an area with no AC power.  He is wanting to use this instead of a generator.  Can the run time of the amp be calculated from the scecs below?  Nothing about time on the site.


Dewalt DCB1800B
1800 Watt Portable Power Station and Parallel Battery Charger

Specifications
120V Receptacles 1
 Batteries Compatible 20V MAX*
 Charging Connection male 120V plug
 Charging Rate 2.0 Amps
 Charging Time 2 hours, 4.0 Ah battery
 Compatible with 20V MAX* batteries
 Height 10.75 in
 Indicator Lights inverter and charger, operation and fault, low battery
 Length 12.75 in
 Max AC Output 3600 Watts
 Max Current (120V/240V) 30 Amps
 Quantity of Batteries Charged 4
 Rated AC Output 1800 Watts
 Rated Current (120V/240V) 15 Amps
 Required Number of Batteries 4
 Sequential or Parallel Charging Parallel
 Shipping Weight 22 lbs
 Sinewave Type modified
 Temperature Range 32-104 F
 Weight without Batteries 18 lbs
 Width 21.3 in
 
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dick rees

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Re: Run life from this power supply
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2017, 12:37:17 pm »

I recommend these.  They'll go forever on no electricity.
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TJ (Tom) Cornish

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Re: Run life from this power supply
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2017, 12:42:52 pm »

My brother-in-law is asking this for a friend.  He has a bass (guitar) amp that he wants to use in an area with no AC power.  He is wanting to use this instead of a generator.  Can the run time of the amp be calculated from the scecs below?  Nothing about time on the site.


Dewalt DCB1800B
1800 Watt Portable Power Station and Parallel Battery Charger

Specifications
120V Receptacles 1
 Batteries Compatible 20V MAX*
 Charging Connection male 120V plug
 Charging Rate 2.0 Amps
 Charging Time 2 hours, 4.0 Ah battery
 Compatible with 20V MAX* batteries
 Height 10.75 in
 Indicator Lights inverter and charger, operation and fault, low battery
 Length 12.75 in
 Max AC Output 3600 Watts
 Max Current (120V/240V) 30 Amps
 Quantity of Batteries Charged 4
 Rated AC Output 1800 Watts
 Rated Current (120V/240V) 15 Amps
 Required Number of Batteries 4
 Sequential or Parallel Charging Parallel
 Shipping Weight 22 lbs
 Sinewave Type modified
 Temperature Range 32-104 F
 Weight without Batteries 18 lbs
 Width 21.3 in
We can make some assumptions.

The 20V (actually 18v - 20v is marketing BS) Flexvolt batteries are 9Ah at 20V or 3Ah at 60V (battery can be either series or series/parallel).  This is 162 watt hours per battery pack.  Multiply that by four and you have 648 watt hours of theoretical power.  Subtract maybe 30% for efficiency loss in the system, and you have 450 watt hours available. 

A bass amp that drew* 60 watts would last 7+ hours.  A bass amp that drew 200 watts would last 2 hours and 15 minutes.

*Actual power consumption, not the "wattage" rating of the amp.


The dirty secret here is the Dewalt charger/inverter is $329 and the big batteries are $200 each, putting you at about $1200, and it's a "Modified sine-wave inverter", meaning the power quality might not be good enough for the amp. 

For comparison, a run of the mill 77Ah deep cycle battery has about 50% more power capacity and is $120.  You would need a decent inverter, but a brief Google search brings up a 1000 watt pure sine inverter for just over $200; the total cost of deep cycle battery plus inverter being $350 after tax.

Unless your brother-in-law already owns all the Dewalt gear for other purposes, I would pass.
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David Allred

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Re: Run life from this power supply
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2017, 12:47:23 pm »

I recommend these.  They'll go forever on no electricity.

Rick,    Ahh.  Thanks.  I'll forward that on.
TJ,  It is a friend of my Bro -in-law, but yada yada.  I'll pass the info along.  thanks

Amp is a Peavey Headliner 1000  Specs below.

NOTE: All specifications tested with mains voltage maintained at nominal level.
Line Voltage:
120V 60 Hz
220V - 240V 50/60 Hz
Typical Power Consumption = 200W
Power Amplifier Specifications:
Input Sensitivity (signal into return jack with master volume set to 5):
7.32 dBu
Power Output:
All measurements with no more than 1% THD + N
8 ohms 700 watts (75.0 VRMS)
4 ohms 1000 watts (63.2 VRMS)
Headphone Amplifier Specifications:
Stereo 8 ohm minimum load
Power Output:
All measurements with no more than 1% THD + N
8 ohms 250 mW (1.41 VRMS) x 2



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dick rees

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Re: Run life from this power supply
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2017, 01:27:50 pm »

https://humless.com/go-series/mini/

Good rigs like this ain't cheap.  Cheap rigs will weigh a ton (deep cycle batteries @ 80# each/ sine wave inverter)...
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David Allred

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Re: Run life from this power supply
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2017, 01:37:37 pm »

OK.  Turns out it is a HS band director.  Needs to operate for a 15 min half-time show.  They already have the Dewalt unit and batteries and were wanting to know if it would do what they need it to do without blowing up the head.
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