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Author Topic: AES splitters  (Read 1554 times)

Chuck Fudge

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Re: AES splitters
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2017, 09:57:31 am »

http://www.atiaudio.com/ViewProduct.aspx?CurPage=DDA106-XLR

I have used this product in a system to distribute from AVID stage rack AES/EBU output card to multiple AES/EBU processor inputs.  Had no problems.

Chuck
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Doug Moran

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Re: AES splitters
« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2017, 12:43:32 pm »

i have used a couple of these for years.  Rock solid.

http://www.henryeng.com/hedigimatch.html

Doug
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Samuel Rees

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Re: AES splitters
« Reply #12 on: July 25, 2017, 03:27:57 pm »

I was unaware you could split AES...usually recommend a AES distribution amp but it appears Whirlwind has a passive box to do just that.
http://whirlwindusa.com/catalog/black-boxes-effects-and-dis/splitters-boxes/aes-sp1x2

My friend has a small powered fulcrum acoustics PA and uses these. One AES cable goes to each stack and hits this splitter which has one out labeled sub and one labeled top. Super slick and has been totally reliable.
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Frank Koenig

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Re: AES splitters
« Reply #13 on: July 25, 2017, 04:34:31 pm »

To give a little background, for what it's worth, AES3 is a balanced 110 Ohm simplex (one-way) system. It expects a 110 Ohm source impedance driving a transmission line of 110 Ohm characteristic impedance that is terminated in a receiver that presents a 110 Ohm load. The edge rates are modest by modern digital communication standards and AES3 is quite tolerant of imperfect conditions. As a result AES3 may be split among any number of daisy-chained receivers (within reason) so long as each but the last has a high, say > 10 kOhm, input impedance. The last in the chain, of course, needs to terminate the line in 110 Ohms, to avoid reflections. I've seen gear (don't remember where) that lets you lift the terminators on the AES inputs to do just such daisy-chaining.

Also, for what it's worth, attached is the circuit for a little AES3 distribution box that I built. It's been running continuously for about 7 years with no problems. Its input is configured for coaxial S/PDIF (the consumer unbalanced standard) but it could easily be reconfigured for proper AES3.

Best,

--Frank

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Yes, it is a giant stereo system!

Peter Morris

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Re: AES splitters
« Reply #14 on: July 25, 2017, 07:58:42 pm »

To give a little background, for what it's worth, AES3 is a balanced 110 Ohm simplex (one-way) system. It expects a 110 Ohm source impedance driving a transmission line of 110 Ohm characteristic impedance that is terminated in a receiver that presents a 110 Ohm load. The edge rates are modest by modern digital communication standards and AES3 is quite tolerant of imperfect conditions. As a result AES3 may be split among any number of daisy-chained receivers (within reason) so long as each but the last has a high, say > 10 kOhm, input impedance. The last in the chain, of course, needs to terminate the line in 110 Ohms, to avoid reflections. I've seen gear (don't remember where) that lets you lift the terminators on the AES inputs to do just such daisy-chaining.

Also, for what it's worth, attached is the circuit for a little AES3 distribution box that I built. It's been running continuously for about 7 years with no problems. Its input is configured for coaxial S/PDIF (the consumer unbalanced standard) but it could easily be reconfigured for proper AES3.

Best,

--Frank



Lake do this ...
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Mike Caldwell

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Re: AES splitters
« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2017, 08:35:07 pm »

Lake do this ...

I guess I could always just up my game and change over to Lake DSP's and forego the need for a splitter!!!! But then again how many splitters could I buy for the cost of two Lake DSP's!
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