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Author Topic: Drum Isolation  (Read 1613 times)

Isaac South

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Re: Drum Isolation
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2017, 10:41:35 pm »

Instead of putting the amp in a room and then having to pump it back through the monitors so the players/singers can hear it, why just position the amp so it is facing the player and not the audience?  And then keep it at a reasonable volume.

And don't fall for the "it needs to be loud to get my tone" nonsense. It may need to not be whisper quiet to get the tone, but if it needs to be loud, then the amp is not properly sized  for the stage and needs to be replaced with something more appropiate.

Great idea. But all the musicians are going to use IEM's. There's no need to point it at him, if he's gonna have it in his ears.

Am I thinking correctly?


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Isaac South

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Re: Drum Isolation
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2017, 10:43:05 pm »

What will be in the pulpit monitors? I hope your not going to try to put a lapel mic in those monitors.

As for the drums, if you want isolation short of building a drum room, electronic drums, I know those two words don't go together when talking to drummers but a good set will sound good and you can take various lines from the controller to give you something to mix.

The pulpit monitors will have the preachers wireless mic (QLX sm58) when he's preaching.

During the music part, it will have everything. So that when the lead singer steps to the front of the stage they can hear everything.


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Erik Jerde

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Re: Drum Isolation
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2017, 10:56:35 pm »

So, in your opinion, the sound should be secondary to the "look" ? ::)

In my opinion you get the right kit and a solid player so you don't need an isolation booth.  Every church I've ever worked with regularly has ditched the full isolation booth eventually.  Not because of anything I did, but because the drummers (good professional players) hated it and because the giant plexi box looks terrible on stage and is really hard to integrate in stage designs.
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Erik Jerde

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Re: Drum Isolation
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2017, 11:00:48 pm »

Lindsay.  This is something I have thought about.  We only have one lead guitar player.  My plan was to put that guitar amp in a room behind the stage and mic it.  Do you think that's a good idea?

The bass, keyboard, and everything else will be direct.

Which brings me to another problem.  We have a B-3 (and Leslie) in our mix, too.  What's the best option for that?  Maybe I should start a new topic solely for that.  I'm sure it's a big topic.

Thanks everyone for your help, so far.  Good info.

Guitar cabs backstage in isolation is very common when you're using IEMs.  Pick up a Radial SGI set so you can balance the signal and go the distance with it.  Great pieces of gear.

Putting the Leslie backstage in isolation is also done.  It's a little more complicated since the B3/Leslie combo uses various multi-pin cables.  You can get them made in longer lengths or if you want you can source the connectors and cable and make it yourself.  Once you get the cable though it's pretty easy.
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Taylor Phillips

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Re: Drum Isolation
« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2017, 11:06:44 pm »

But when we are at full-tilt (we are a lively church), it would sound terrible to have no stage volume and then a set of drums in the corner with no isolation at full volume.  Correct?
I don't think it will sound terrible.  The only issue I think you might have is them being too loud for the singers to hear themselves in their monitors.  Off stage, if your system has proper coverage, no one in the congregation should notice.  One thing I am definitely not a fan of is drums in the floor monitors.  If you guys are as lively as some places I've been, the electric drum volume from just a couple of monitors can be as loud or louder than an actual acoustic set would be on stage, but with the sound going in the wrong direction.  Also, it's amazing what just a little bit of technique and the right equipment can do.  I had a drummer in one place who was way too loud, showed him a couple to tips on how to play softer and bought him a pair of ProMark HotRods - the next week we had to mic the kit.   
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Caleb Dueck

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Re: Drum Isolation
« Reply #15 on: July 11, 2017, 11:11:29 pm »

I know churches that love good drum booths, such as the Perdue kit.  It allows the drummer to hit the drums they should be for the best tone.   We did a studio session with softly hit drums turned up vs firmly hit drums, same SPL in the end - guess which sounded a lot better. 

I saw photos of Isaac's church, it's small and acoustically live.  A drum booth would be a great idea.

I know many, many churches which have gone to drum booths, or V-Drums for that matter.  Nearly zero that have gone back to an acoustic kit that don't have a large (1k+ seats) room. 

For looks, a good drum booth or drum room allows for creative haze and lighting looks.

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John Chiara

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Re: Drum Isolation
« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2017, 12:22:33 am »

Instead of putting the amp in a room and then having to pump it back through the monitors so the players/singers can hear it, why just position the amp so it is facing the player and not the audience?  And then keep it at a reasonable volume.

And don't fall for the "it needs to be loud to get my tone" nonsense. It may need to not be whisper quiet to get the tone, but if it needs to be loud, then the amp is not properly sized  for the stage and needs to be replaced with something more appropiate.

Yeah this. I lost my first gig this year due to making 'suggestions' that 'offended.' It was all comments on the drummers in Christian Worship bands who play in drum rooms at church. They have NO idea how to play on a normal stage. They are isolated at church so the worship leaders never comment on volume..and the drummers never learn to listen and adapt...and then get belligerent when their smash/bang loud playing gets amplified through 8 live vocal mics and live monitors, and the live sound person brings it to their attention. It might fix the immediate volume problem, but it sure doesn't educate the players. It's kind of like deciding which digital console to buy based on the abilities of the least skilled operator.
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Keith Broughton

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Re: Drum Isolation
« Reply #17 on: July 12, 2017, 05:25:41 am »

In my opinion you get the right kit and a solid player so you don't need an isolation booth.
True...and you might win the Power Ball too  ;D
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lindsay Dean

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Re: Drum Isolation
« Reply #18 on: July 12, 2017, 03:31:14 pm »

  As far as the amps and Leslie cab backstage all good for control.
you need a separate monitor mix ie monitor sends for each player
including the vocalists .
   The ultimate would be iem's for all , but just getting the musicians on iems would be good . the vocalists could have a separate mix on stage monitors.
      Most preachers want very little or no monitor so that could be ok.
   I would suggest trying to get the pastor to buy into the idea of a  country man e6 headworn mic for his exclusive use , you will have a lot more gain before feedback . lavalieres can be a pain.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2017, 02:11:45 pm by lindsay Dean »
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Mike Caldwell

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Re: Drum Isolation
« Reply #19 on: July 12, 2017, 07:45:57 pm »

     I would suggest trying to get the pastor to buy into the idea of a  country man e6 headworn mic for his exclusive use , you will have a lot more gain before feedback . lavalieres can be a pain.

Actually he said the preacher is using a wireless QLX58, of course we all know the mic technique could be from one extreme to the other with a handheld wireless.
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