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Author Topic: GPS  (Read 923 times)

John Roberts {JR}

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Re: GPS
« Reply #20 on: May 18, 2017, 10:58:28 am »

That is beyond rude.

Same thing happened to me while I was in the garage with the door up. HONK, HONK. Many old caddys and a 65 Mustang exposed to the street. I don't mind a knock on the door looking for a barn find, they get a polite "No thanks", as I have done this myself.

 I grabbed a canned compressed air horn, hid it behind me, and walked up to the car. One of three large guys rolled down the window, and I blasted him right in the face. "This ain't Sonic, asshole" (a fast food stand with carhops, where you beep for service) and walked away. But I doubt he heard me at all, after that airhorn blast.

Rude gets answered with even ruder, around here.

Gene
I didn't walk out to his car, I just waved him away with an arm gesture that was much more polite than he deserved. At least the church missionaries knock on the door... I kind of wish they stayed in their cars...

JR
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frank kayser

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Re: GPS
« Reply #21 on: May 18, 2017, 05:00:58 pm »

Bob,. This may amaze you but cars made in the last decade actually have a GPS built into the dashboard.  You should really check it out.

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
Having both a BMW and VW nav system, I can say that the technology in at least these in-dash nav systems is way behind the Garmin Zumo 550.  I have for my motorcycle that I bought in 2005.  Yes, some of the in-dash nav systems have larger screens - but lane assist, street names are "simple" things missing from the upgraded BMW system or the VW JSW.  You're stuck if you don't like its operation - like the ineffective zooming algorithm on the VW that can't be overridden.


As long as the GPS does what you want, it's OK.  As for my Zumo, it was ridiculously overpriced and hopelessly outdated when I bought it - but it had an IP67 water/dust rating which was necessary for long distance motorcycling.  Its slow and cartoonish, much like the Nuvis Garmin produces.  There is never enough detail. A 16:9 display for mapping is useless - but if the info screens were moved there - many still steal screen real estate at the top and bottom - leaving the view ahead even more condensed.  Still better than the BMW or VW in-dash.


Compared to a recent purchase of a 2015 Nuvi, the Zumo is hopelessly old and clunky.  I also have worked with TomTom, and find them lacking, as well.  For the most part, they are wholly adequate for last-mile navigation.


Be it known, I was a fairly early adopter, and I have not been impressed with the progress over the last 10 or so years.  No GPS unit I've ever seen does what I want, the way I want it done.  As a broad generality, the modern GPS' are a dull tool, at best.  The advantage of a dash unit is that, with luck, someone will steal it along with the banjo and the accordion in the back seat.


Guess this turned into a rant - mea culpa.













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Ned Ward

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Re: GPS
« Reply #22 on: May 19, 2017, 01:26:00 pm »

I travel almost every other week for work, visiting exotic locales like Naperville, IL, Bentonville, AR, or road tripping up from LA to San Francisco. Had a Garmin Nuvi, and while it was good, it was only for traffic. Same with Apple Maps - it has a great new user interface (nice and big) but it's traffic only.

Waze wins for me because it not only does traffic, but has info on accidents ahead, and police - so that if I'm late for an appointment (or to the airport) I can perhaps drive faster than required. My daily driver is a '67 Pontiac Lemans, so no built-in GPS in the Delco AM radio, although I may spring for a Delco AM/FM radio if I find one on fleabay within a good price. So having all the info on the phone is helpful.

Other nice thing about Waze - it pulls contact and calendar info in, and with traffic, will tell me when to leave.

Free, and worth the download to try. One of my sales reps who's old school was using Apple Maps, and in the passenger seat I told him there was a major accident 2 miles up which was why traffic was stopped. He's now using Waze as well.

Other thing I hate about onboard/built-in GPS systems - no changes can be made unless the car is stopped, usually even by the passenger. Am I really going to pull over to stop to have my wife or passenger update where we're going?
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: GPS
« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2017, 02:35:54 pm »

Other thing I hate about onboard/built-in GPS systems - no changes can be made unless the car is stopped, usually even by the passenger. Am I really going to pull over to stop to have my wife or passenger update where we're going?

I find the onboard navigation built into many cars to be slow, cumbersome to use, and out of date. I'm one of those people who uses an app on the phone. I use Google Maps 'cuz it's there and is sufficient for my needs.

The advantage of an app is that it's always up-to-date and gives realtime traffic information. Sure, some dedicated GPS units have traffic info capabilities.

The disadvantage of an app is that it usually requires a data connection. That's not available everywhere, and if you lose the connection you'll be wishing you at least had a paper map.

My 2012 Honda Accord has a nav system built on NavTeq (now called HERE). What I don't like about it is that entering data if you haven't learned the voice commands is so tedious as to be useless. The other thing is that in rural areas, it might find the address on the map but once you're off the main highway, it won't build a route. It will just tell you your destination is "over there somewhere" and leaves it up to you to figure out how to get there. I haven't updated it because updates are $149 (sometimes available for $99), the Google Navigation app on my phone serves me well, and I don't know that the update will actually improve the rural navigation.

If I had my way, I wouldn't put a nav system in a car. I'd put in a touch screen that links via bluetooth to the mobile device, and lets you use whatever app you want on your mobile device but use the car's bigger screen and better speakers.
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Ned Ward

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Re: GPS
« Reply #24 on: May 19, 2017, 04:24:07 pm »

Jonathan - Waze and Google Maps share the same database for realtime traffic info; it's just a different front end. Depends on what you like; I couldn't stand Google Maps, but like Waze; your mileage may vary which front end you like, but its free to try.

Apple Maps with the latest update is much better, and they're starting to add local transit maps (subways, etc.) to cities, but still none in Hong Kong, which desperately needs it.

Paper map - can't remember last time I looked at one; when I moved to Los Angeles in '94, I was told I needed to get a Thomas Guide, but never did. Talk about vintage tech...
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