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Author Topic: Meyer UPA-1C  (Read 2045 times)

Landon Lewsaw

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Meyer UPA-1C
« on: April 20, 2017, 09:03:51 am »

Hey guys, looking for some expert opinion.  I bought half a dozen pristine UPAs out of a drama theatre install.  They don't know what happened to the M-1A processors.  Now I've tested all the boxes biamping them at 1.6k like Meyer recommends, they sound good.  What is the processor going to do for me, some time/phase alignment?  I know there's protection circuitry.  The processors don't appear easy to locate.  Can a guy find a workaround with other hardware?  Thanks.
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Mac Kerr

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« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2017, 09:33:48 am »

Hey guys, looking for some expert opinion.

Please go to your profile and change your displayed name to your real full name to comply with the posting rules of these forums.

Mac
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Riley Casey

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Re: Meyer UPA-1C
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2017, 07:24:35 pm »

The processor provides eq, crossover and most importantly from your POV in trying to emulate the original processor is limiting.  You can rent a processor and run a transfer function on the frequency and phase response of each band pass and get fairly close. The limiters are run from sense ports on the back of the processor evaluating the voltage swing of the low and high frequency power amps and moving the high pass filter depending on program spectrum and level.  If your output level expectations are low and to plan to run them with a fairly conservative high pass filter then simply emulating the crossover and eq functions are probably all that's needed. If you want to wring every possible db of level out of them then plan on doing some really extensive measurements and reverse engineering.

MikeHarris

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Re: Meyer UPA-1C
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2017, 07:24:48 pm »

How many M1A's you need ?
I may have a client with a few extra
Where are you located
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Landon Lewsaw

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Re: Meyer UPA-1C
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2017, 07:25:27 pm »

How many M1A's you need ?
I may have a client with a few extra
Where are you located

Mmm, at least a couple, but I'm up here in the Great White North.  Between shipping and exchange it might not make sense.  I'm mulling over just buying a dbx driverack if my x32 can't provide adequate delay to time align the drivers. 
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Mac Kerr

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Re: Meyer UPA-1C
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2017, 08:52:45 pm »

Mmm, at least a couple, but I'm up here in the Great White North.  Between shipping and exchange it might not make sense.  I'm mulling over just buying a dbx driverack if my x32 can't provide adequate delay to time align the drivers.

While time alignment was a central theme of Meyer's designs, the M1A was an analog processor, there wasn't much in the way of "delay" in there. AFAIK driver alignment was done with filter design to provide the right phase relationship.

Mac
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dick rees

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Re: Meyer UPA-1C
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2017, 09:00:05 pm »

Hey guys, looking for some expert opinion.  I bought half a dozen pristine UPAs out of a drama theatre install.  They don't know what happened to the M-1A processors.  The processors don't appear easy to locate.  Can a guy find a workaround with other hardware?  Thanks.

There are currently three of them on E-bay.
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Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain...

Jim McKeveny

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Re: Meyer UPA-1C
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2017, 08:26:28 am »

While time alignment was a central theme of Meyer's designs, the M1A was an analog processor, there wasn't much in the way of "delay" in there. AFAIK driver alignment was done with filter design to provide the right phase relationship.

BINGO! We have a winner!

The UPA maximized oldschool technique of alignment: Get the VC's as physically aligned as possible, while factoring-in tradeoffs regarding pattern, MOL, etc.
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Joseph D. Macry

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Re: Meyer UPA-1C
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2017, 10:45:50 am »

While time alignment was a central theme of Meyer's designs, the M1A was an analog processor, there wasn't much in the way of "delay" in there. AFAIK driver alignment was done with filter design to provide the right phase relationship.

Mac

Phase alignment around the crossover point is what they got right that nobody else could.
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Joseph Macry, CTS-I
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brian maddox

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Re: Meyer UPA-1C
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2017, 04:54:59 pm »

Phase alignment around the crossover point is what they got right that nobody else could.

this^^

If you can find an original Meyer M1A analog processor at anything like a reasonable cost, i'd go that route.  Between having a 0 latency processor as well as the sensing circuits built in, i think it's a no brainer.
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brian maddox
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'...do not trifle with affairs of dragons...

       ....for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup...'
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