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Author Topic: How I feel...Rant  (Read 2973 times)

Scott Holtzman

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Re: How I feel...Rant
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2017, 04:55:20 pm »

I saw Shure advertising the 50th Anniversary Edition of the SM58.
I called two distributors who get us Shure items, they both said "Limited run, stock is depleted, no more to come." (The 50th Anniv of SM58 was in 2016.)
So I tried buying it directly from Shure, full price.
The mic arrived within 4 days.


Should have called Ray Aberle.  My 50th version is sitting on the shelf in my office, had one of the first runs.



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Ray Aberle

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Re: How I feel...Rant
« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2017, 05:24:40 pm »


Should have called Ray Aberle.  My 50th version is sitting on the shelf in my office, had one of the first runs.

Thank you. :) I still have three left in stock, actually, although I should probably keep one in pristine condition.

-Ray
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Don T. Williams

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Re: How I feel...Rant
« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2017, 06:01:58 pm »

I saw Shure advertising the 50th Anniversary Edition of the SM58.

So I tried buying it directly from Shure, full price.
The mic arrived within 4 days.

So did you actually buy it directly from Shure?  If so, that doesn't sit well with me as a stocking dealer.  I will tell you the dealer margin on an SM58 is one of the lowest in the industry when you sell at the MAP "street price".  I have lower priced mics that I sell that earn me 2 to 3 times as much profit.  Yes, its a good mic and an easy sell, but it's not a high profit item.
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Ray Aberle

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Re: How I feel...Rant
« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2017, 06:41:45 pm »

Do you do the eBay thing? I love it when people will send a "Best Offer" on a SM57 or 58. They'll offer you $50, or whatever. "I see other people selling them for $60!" Yeah, no, not if they're a legit dealer selling genuine product they're not... or they like losing money?!?

-Ray
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: How I feel...Rant
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2017, 10:12:35 pm »

I sure would hate to participate in this race to the bottom... 

(any more).  ::)

JR
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eric lenasbunt

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Re: How I feel...Rant
« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2017, 12:37:48 am »

I've been experiencing the same thing over the last year and it's very frustrating. Basic stuff. If I quote a small install with some of the most common gear possible I still get at least one or two key components backordered. Shure is actually one of the best at not having backordered or keeping them to a week or two. That being said I mostly sell BLX and QLXD...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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Stephen Kirby

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Re: How I feel...Rant
« Reply #16 on: April 14, 2017, 02:34:31 am »

Welcome to "lean manufacturing" -- when "just in time" means it's always late.

The idea is that you stock nothing. Instead, you manufacture to meet demand. You order your raw materials to arrive just as that step in the manufacturing process begins. That way, you don't have a bunch of money tied up in inventory, especially inventory that you don't have an immediate use or market for. By not having capital tied up in inventory, you can more quickly respond to changing market conditions.

This all assumes that your customer ALWAYS knows two weeks (or whatever) in advance of needing something. The problem is the world doesn't work that way. 90% or more of end users don't plan ahead; when they want something they want it NOW. That means that somebody, somewhere along the line HAS to keep SOMETHING in inventory.

So "lean manufacturing" sounds great on paper, but in practice it means "always late." Because end users don't anticipate their needs two to ten weeks out.
That's not what "lean manufacturing" means.  It means you don't pile up product between workstations or operations in the manufacturing area.  You balance the work content so that when something moves to the next operation, the operator starts on the next one, but not until the downstream operator has consumed theirs.
Sales and logistics departments are still responsible for forecasting demand and maintaining the pipeline.  Now it's true that inventory sitting in a warehouse is just flushing money down the toilet.  So those folks have to try and keep the manufacturing line running at the designed rate and absorb the hills and valleys in demand.  As an idle manufacturing line (and idle component inventory) is expensive too.  So the whole thing is attempted to ratchet forward one device at a time.
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Mike Sokol

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Re: How I feel...Rant
« Reply #17 on: April 14, 2017, 08:35:00 am »

Welcome to "lean manufacturing" -- when "just in time" means it's always late.

The idea is that you stock nothing. Instead, you manufacture to meet demand. You order your raw materials to arrive just as that step in the manufacturing process begins. That way, you don't have a bunch of money tied up in inventory, especially inventory that you don't have an immediate use or market for. By not having capital tied up in inventory, you can more quickly respond to changing market conditions.

And not only inventory. The SPACE for that inventory is expensive. When I worked for Corning Glass back in the 70's we had a 1,000,000 square foot warehouse just for our packaging plant. So we would receive trainloads of glass products  from the hot glass plants, then put them in the warehouse for weeks or sometimes months before we took them to the assembly line. We also warehoused all the packaging material for an entire run of each product. Since we had 12 assembly lines that would crank out around 10,000 pieces per line per shift, and we ran 2 shifts, that was around 250,000 assembled boxes of dishes and such PER DAY. So that was well over 1 million retail boxes shipped per week. I was designing automated packaging machines to speed up the process with less labor, and had to leave enough room for fork trucks to stage at least 3 or 4 pallets of raw materials per packaging machine. And sometimes we had 6 to 10 machines on each packaging line. The logistics of warehousing that much material and getting it to each packaging line on time was staggering. And then they began implementing JIT production with terrible results at first. Entire packaging lines would be shut down for hours or days while we waited for product to be delivered to us JIT. And of course our own distributors were on JIT from us, so if our plant missing a packaging deadline, then the ripple was felt down the line. JIT only works well when EVERYTHING works.

Of the other hand, I've recently published a book through Amazon which is the ultimate in JIT. When someone orders a print copy online, it's printed and shipped as a one-off. And that only takes a few days for them to print, package, and deliver to anyone in the world. Then the profit of the sale goes directly into my PayPal account without me having to touch anything. So I don't have to do pre-printed runs, there's no warehousing for me, and I don't have a single shipping box or padded bag. It all happens in the background perfectly. Amazon is one company that's really good at JIT production.

Stephen Swaffer

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Re: How I feel...Rant
« Reply #18 on: April 14, 2017, 12:58:35 pm »

Three different manufacturers (they actually make the SKUs) are out of stock and and nobody can tell you when they will have them?  Perhaps you are not talking to the right people. Dealers were able to find me at Peavey when some of my hot products were out of stock. (I resisted the temptation to forward those calls to the factory manager I was fighting with to build more mixers.)

That sounds like an opportunity for at least one of the manufacturers.

I recall a time, long long ago, when Peavey stayed in constant back order because the dealers anticipated increasing sales and bought to hold JIC inventory in their stores. Peavey had the luxury of always having a home for their full production they built as they could increase that production.... but alas that world changed well before the end of last century.   

Apparently you felt no need to have any inventory in stock either.  :-\

JR

Needed repair parts for a production machine back in January.  Our business is somewhat seasonal and peak time is April-July.  Expected delivery (how often do they hit that?) is mid-June.  I guess we drop $1.5 million and put a second machine in the building to rob for spare parts?  For some special O-rings that should cost 50 cents apience, but can only be had as part of a rebuild kit costing over $150.  I can't keep a spare of everything on the machine.  I'm of the mind they should put a different brand on the machine-someone that actually supports their product.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: How I feel...Rant
« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2017, 01:59:22 pm »

Needed repair parts for a production machine back in January.  Our business is somewhat seasonal and peak time is April-July.  Expected delivery (how often do they hit that?) is mid-June.  I guess we drop $1.5 million and put a second machine in the building to rob for spare parts?  For some special O-rings that should cost 50 cents apience, but can only be had as part of a rebuild kit costing over $150.  I can't keep a spare of everything on the machine.  I'm of the mind they should put a different brand on the machine-someone that actually supports their product.
I don't know if this makes sense (yet?) but they are developing 3D printing technology to handle different media, including metal. At some point you may be able to roll your own obscure o-rings, gaskets , whatever.

Jay Leno reportedly has two printers to make impossible to find parts for his antique classic cars, and detroit already uses metal 3D printing to make prototypes.

JR
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