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Author Topic: Front lighting  (Read 3081 times)

Jeff Lelko

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Re: Front lighting
« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2017, 03:27:10 pm »

The difference can be seen here...

Ah, you beat me to it Steve.  Yes, I was going to comment that the picture further up is a better example of why NOT to use strictly RGB LEDs for facial lighting.  Maybe the specific color was the intention of the LD - I can't really say - but just about every RGB Par I've seen (COB or otherwise) can't make a good white, amber, or yellow.  They all come off with that exact lavender-tinged harsh pink color that I find unacceptable for most uses.  ETC's RGB+Lime combination seems to get around that issue, but otherwise I wouldn't consider anything less than an RGBW, RGBA, or RGBAW unit for LED front lighting.   
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Len Zenith Jr

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Re: Front lighting
« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2017, 08:54:08 pm »

For front lighting I use a RGBW fixture on white only paired with a Lee warm amber 2 gel. Lee pretty much nailed the look of a traditional halogen par color temp when used with a white led. It does however mess with the other RGB colors, some more than others.
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Mark Cadwallader

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Re: Front lighting
« Reply #32 on: March 10, 2017, 09:38:36 pm »

As to mounting lights to the fly track, assuming that the track is "L track" (logistics track), there are double stud fittings with a theaded stud that you could probably adapt. Check vendors of E track and L track for examples.
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"Good tools are expensive, but cheap tools are damned expensive."

Graham Spice

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Re: Front lighting
« Reply #33 on: March 13, 2017, 11:36:03 pm »

How about this:Those lights are crazy bright and have great throw. They are priced so cheap that you can get a few for back/side lights to complete a proper static stage lighting rig.

I've been using them for a while now. Great lights for the price. I have NOT used the Stagg T-bar extension but saw it at the NAMM show and thought it would be a great solution for doing exactly what you're talking about...mounting front lights to your main speakers stands.

If you do this, I would definitely add some weight to your tripod stand legs. Sandbags would be a minimum addition to this kind of setup if you're putting those stands anywhere near the audience...
« Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 11:40:13 pm by Graham Spice »
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Justin Waters

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Re: Front lighting
« Reply #34 on: March 16, 2017, 01:58:08 pm »

How about this:Those lights are crazy bright and have great throw. They are priced so cheap that you can get a few for back/side lights to complete a proper static stage lighting rig.

I've been using them for a while now. Great lights for the price. I have NOT used the Stagg T-bar extension but saw it at the NAMM show and thought it would be a great solution for doing exactly what you're talking about...mounting front lights to your main speakers stands.

If you do this, I would definitely add some weight to your tripod stand legs. Sandbags would be a minimum addition to this kind of setup if you're putting those stands anywhere near the audience...

That Stagg extension is really interesting.  I wonder how much you need to balance the center of gravity on those tho.
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Jeff Lelko

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Re: Front lighting
« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2017, 06:37:08 pm »

That Stagg extension is really interesting.  I wonder how much you need to balance the center of gravity on those tho.

What do you mean?  The apparatus is already designed to impart essentially no shift in the X/Y axis center of gravity so long as the load up top is balanced.  As far as the Z-axis goes, keeping the CG down shouldn't be that hard either.  So long as the stand you're using can handle the speaker weight plus the Stagg weight plus the light(s) weight plus any cables or other rigging hardware you should be okay.  Common sense comes into play here too - if it looks unsafe it probably is.  If you need to go rather high some sandbags can help add stability too.
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