ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Needless to say I metered this very carefully  (Read 885 times)

DavidTurner

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 236
Needless to say I metered this very carefully
« on: February 25, 2017, 02:21:00 pm »

Tieing in at a rodeo, came upon this



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Logged

Mike Sokol

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2731
  • Lead instructor for the No~Shock~Zone
    • No~Shock~Zone Electrical Safety
Re: Needless to say I metered this very carefully
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2017, 05:23:53 pm »

Tieing in at a rodeo, came upon this

Ride 'em, cowboy...  :o

John Fruits

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 406
Re: Needless to say I metered this very carefully
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2017, 05:32:56 pm »

Sounds like that wasn't your first rodeo, pardner.
Logged
"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs.  There's also a negative side."-Hunter S. Thompson

DavidTurner

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 236
Re: Needless to say I metered this very carefully
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2017, 01:25:32 am »

In fairness to the fine folks at the San Antonio Livestock Show and Rodeo I am including the actual show tie in below. The one above is for temporary use while the rodeo is in progress - before the stage and monitor trailer are towed in after the bull rides.  For those who haven't experienced it, the performance is done on a 40x30 rotating oval stage that folds up and is towed out after sound check, the towed back in post rodeo for the musical entertainment  .


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Logged

DavidTurner

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 236
Needless to say I metered this very carefully
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2017, 01:28:39 am »

Sounds like that wasn't your first rodeo, pardner.
No sir, it certainly wasn't.

Here is a photo of the stage;






Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: February 26, 2017, 01:31:41 am by DavidTurner »
Logged

brian maddox

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1355
Re: Needless to say I metered this very carefully
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2017, 10:23:04 pm »

Sounds like that wasn't your first rodeo, pardner.

I have used the expression "this isn't my first rodeo" so many times that i'm fairly certain people who have worked with me more than once just roll their eyes when i'm not looking.

But it occurred to me recently that i've not actually Worked a Real Rodeo.

So now it's on my bucket list to somehow end up on a rodeo show crew.  Then I'll run around all day excitedly telling EVERYONE  "Oh My God!  This is my First Rodeo!  Can you Believe IT!  My Actual First Rodeo  I'm So Excited!!!!"   ;D ;D ;D
Logged
brian maddox
11brian.maddox11@gmail.com

'...do not trifle with affairs of dragons...

       ....for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup...'

DavidTurner

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 236
Re: Needless to say I metered this very carefully
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2017, 11:49:46 pm »

Well Brian, my first rodeo was the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo - which is billed as "The Worlds Biggest Rodeo" - in 1983. Over the years I have played virtually all the major ones including Cheyenne (Wyoming) Frontier Days - which is billed as the world's biggest OUTDOOR rodeo, and The Calgary (Alberta) Stampede - which makes a similar claim. They all have some means of bringing the stage into the arena after the bull riding. Most have some sort of circular, rotating stage situated in the center of the arena. Some have a stage on wheels that is dragged out in front of the grand stand. A couple (notably Dixie Nationals in Jackson, Mississippi) fly the stage up in to the ceiling after sound check and lower it at the appropriate time. A few have permanent stages at one end of the arena - the one in Pueblo, Colorado is built on top of the bull cage. All are dusty, stinky, stressful, loooong days. Adding livestock and dirt to the usual difficulties and distractions makes it a busy day to say the least. Most of the local crews - notably LD Systems from Houston, Texas - are outstanding at their jobs and do their level best to make the day go as smoothly as possible. Getting the dust out of your faders and the excrement off your snake afterward is an essential but never pleasant task.

I have used the expression "this isn't my first rodeo" so many times that i'm fairly certain people who have worked with me more than once just roll their eyes when i'm not looking.

But it occurred to me recently that i've not actually Worked a Real Rodeo.

So now it's on my bucket list to somehow end up on a rodeo show crew.  Then I'll run around all day excitedly telling EVERYONE  "Oh My God!  This is my First Rodeo!  Can you Believe IT!  My Actual First Rodeo  I'm So Excited!!!!"   ;D ;D ;D
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.079 seconds with 18 queries.