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Author Topic: When a high-res version of a dance track customer wants doesn't exist  (Read 2230 times)

Mike Caldwell

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Re: When a high-res version of a dance track customer wants doesn't exist
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2016, 10:30:28 am »

I like it when at the last minute someone hands me their phone saying they got the music from You Tube and it's obvious they recorded it by holding the phone next to the distorted speaker on their laptop. For added enjoyment you can hear the phone klank against the lap case every now and then.

Playback audio quality of locally produced video clips can be fun as well.

Marcus Bosch

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Re: When a high-res version of a dance track customer wants doesn't exist
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2016, 11:59:24 am »

If someone is performing a choreographed routine, it is unlikely they will consider another track, nor is it appropriate that an audio operator would suggest such a thing. If they have mixed a couple of tracks together, for instance, you will be stuck with their mix, because the choreography will require the exact timing. .. unless of course, you can get the original tracks and remix it yourself.... a lot of effort to go to for a 2 minute Zumba demonstration, though. :)

Zumba's business model is as such-
- They 'register' Zumba instructors (for a fee)
- They charge their instructors a monthly subscription fee
- Zumba provides the instructors with "approved" music monthly
- Zumba (the corporation) handles the music licensing for public play, and share that approval with their instructors through that monthly subscription fee

This all being said- the Zumba group should (if they are official, Zumba- licensed) have legal permission for their music to be played with their performance, and they should be able to contact the Zumba corporation to get this music track for playback at their event. If Zumba no longer offers that track, you should ask them to consider choosing another song. But, since they are Zumba-licensed, I BELIEVE you can live stream the YouTube video legally. (But, we're professionals, and that's not something we'd like to ever to. ;) )

-Ray
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Mac Kerr

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« Reply #12 on: October 26, 2016, 12:05:22 pm »

If someone is performing

Please go to your profile and change the "Name" field to your real first and last name as required by the posting rules displayed in the header at the top of the section, and in the Site Rules and Suggestions in the Forum Announcements section, and on the registration page when you registered.

Mac
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Ray Aberle

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Re: When a high-res version of a dance track customer wants doesn't exist
« Reply #13 on: October 26, 2016, 01:31:55 pm »

If someone is performing a choreographed routine, it is unlikely they will consider another track, nor is it appropriate that an audio operator would suggest such a thing. If they have mixed a couple of tracks together, for instance, you will be stuck with their mix, because the choreography will require the exact timing. ..
Since the services are being donated, I would argue there's a bit more leeway in the OP making requests such as this. He wants to make sure that the sound is the best it can be, since he's presumably advertising/otherwise getting visibility for the show.

I'm not sure if you read my post or not, but again, Zumba provides the music for their instructors. The instructors have to use the music that Zumba provides, since it's appropriately licensed for public play. They won't have mixed two tracks together- if you go to a Zumba class, you will see they're simply playing tracks from a playlist on their audio playback device.

unless of course, you can get the original tracks and remix it yourself.... a lot of effort to go to for a 2 minute Zumba demonstration, though. :)
Doing a live mix of the tracks would be OK. To mix it to a recording, and then playback, is creating a new, distinct version of both songs, which would then need to be appropriately licensed for public playback.

-Ray
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Don T. Williams

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Re: When a high-res version of a dance track customer wants doesn't exist
« Reply #14 on: October 26, 2016, 03:28:43 pm »

I don't know about the legalities, but about eight years ago, I was ask to "burn" a set of tracks to a CD for a Ballet Folklorica dance troupe.  Many of the tracks were cassettes and some were of live bands that played songs that were not available from any source.

On one of the tapes, I heard the pop of the cassette starting the recording process, the person walk across the room and drop the needle on the turntable, and then walk away.  I can't be certain, but I could swear it was a 78 speed record playing through a gramophone!

I was ask it could clean that up for the "tracks" CD!
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George Dougherty

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Re: When a high-res version of a dance track customer wants doesn't exist
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2016, 11:56:58 pm »

If the system sounds good at all other points in the show and the Zumba track sounds like crap, I don't think I'd want to work with a potential client that held me responsible for a few minutes of poor audio with zero understanding that the rest of it was really what my regular product sounded like.

IOW, don't sweat it at all.
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