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Author Topic: A basic network diagram for sound  (Read 7123 times)

Keith Broughton

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Re: A basic network diagram for sound
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2016, 08:38:50 am »

Look for a model that allows you to turn off the router. I'll do some searching tonight if you like.
Don't spend any time on this. I'll check for router disable function.
Thanks :)
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Rob Spence

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Re: A basic network diagram for sound
« Reply #21 on: February 09, 2016, 12:31:39 pm »

Don't spend any time on this. I'll check for router disable function.
Thanks :)

Ok, I gotta ask. Why bother? Having the router there isn't hurting anything.


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rob at lynxaudioservices dot com

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William Schnake

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Re: A basic network diagram for sound
« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2016, 08:27:22 am »

I thought after the many conversations pertaining to basic connectivity and networking I might provide an easy to follow and simple EXAMPLE of what a small sound network could be. If appreciated I could take the time to write a beginners paper for wireless networking, explaining what works, what doesn't, and uncover the mysteries in obtaining reliable wireless networking communication. This would have nothing to do with microphones or wireless devices of that type.
Thanks Bob, for me a picture is very helpful.  Yes, I am a visual learner as my wife the teach says.  Also, I want to thank you for the clarification on Access Point vs. Router in a post from last week.  Next time I am in the Boston area, I owe you a beer or two.  ;)

Thanks again.

Bill
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Keith Broughton

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Re: A basic network diagram for sound
« Reply #23 on: February 10, 2016, 04:23:03 pm »

Ok, I gotta ask. Why bother? Having the router there isn't hurting anything.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
Good point..I have no good answer :-[
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: A basic network diagram for sound
« Reply #24 on: February 10, 2016, 06:56:28 pm »

Look for a model that allows you to turn off the router. I'll do some searching tonight if you like.

I just did a quick search and see the DD-wrt is alive and well and supported on an ass load of routers with modern radios in them, included them vaunted marvel chipset.

dd-wrt is a Linux micro-kernel based open source router OS.  It let's you customize your router to a degree you don't get outside of enterprise based devices running software such as Cisco IOS.  DD-WRT includes OpenVPN, wireless roaming, bridging, repeating, complex routing, VLAN's.  You name it does it. 

So in my opinion you can either use the Ubiquity or TP-Link Access Points that are dirt simple to setup or a DD-WRT based device.

More info here - http://www.dd-wrt.com/site/index

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Bob Leonard

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Re: A basic network diagram for sound
« Reply #25 on: February 10, 2016, 07:20:46 pm »

Thanks Scott, good to know.
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Joel T. Glaser

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Re: A basic network diagram for sound
« Reply #26 on: March 19, 2016, 01:42:31 pm »

Thanks for the timely post Bob. I'm just getting started in the area and like someone else mentioned, I too am more visual. I'm starting to understand the basics of how this all works and your diagram helps.

Thanks again.

Joel
Studio 52
« Last Edit: March 23, 2016, 10:32:20 pm by Joel T. Glaser »
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: A basic network diagram for sound
« Reply #27 on: April 20, 2016, 08:12:57 pm »

Great diagram, Bob.

There are certainly many scenarios we can all dream up about different ways to configure a network. I think those considerations are best left as a side discussion; keeping it simple is best for a general guide such as this.

Regarding DHCP vs. static addressing: in a small network such as described, the router usually serves as a DHCP server. I recommend leaving the DHCP server enabled, but a limited scope. Many routers will assign addresses anywhere in the .2 to .254 range; I typically reduce this to .100-199. That leaves other addresses available for static assignment without resulting in an address conflict with a dynamically assigned address. The DHCP server will provide immediate connectivity for devices that need to be added to the network; some devices are easier to configure with static addresses if they have a DHCP server available for the initial configuration on the network.

Critical devices (network infrastructure like routers, switches, access points; mixer; control workstations) should have statically-assigned addresses where possible; loss of a dynamically assigned (or DHCP reservation) address during a live performance can be a bad thing. Static addresses should never be assigned within the DHCP scope to avoid conflicts.

I do like to use DHCP reservations for non-critical equipment that needs stable addressing (such as a network printer). It makes modifying the configuration easier to have a central place to do it. However, that implies that your DHCP service is running on a server or an advanced router; few home routers provide for DHCP reservations (and fewer provide for custom DHCP options).

I agree that designating ranges within the subnet for different classes of devices is a good practice. For example, .1 to .19 for network infrastructure; .20 to .49 for servers; .50 to .69 for printers; .70 to .99 for workstations (static or DHCP reservation); .100 to .199 for DHCP clients (dynamic addressing); etc.
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Aaron Becker

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Re: A basic network diagram for sound
« Reply #28 on: April 22, 2016, 12:25:44 am »

I too appreciate the insight for how all of you manage network structure as it relates to live sound. My only struggle over the years has been protecting the "sound" network from unwanted internet leaches. And, protecting the equipment from the internet. Through some old friends who work in IT I've been working to learn how to do some VLAN routing on the network to achieve this. It works pretty well.
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Rob Spence

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Re: A basic network diagram for sound
« Reply #29 on: April 22, 2016, 11:45:31 am »

I too appreciate the insight for how all of you manage network structure as it relates to live sound. My only struggle over the years has been protecting the "sound" network from unwanted internet leaches. And, protecting the equipment from the internet. Through some old friends who work in IT I've been working to learn how to do some VLAN routing on the network to achieve this. It works pretty well.

Easy, don't connect the audio network to the Internet 😎

If you must connect to an existing network that is connected to the Internet, then do it through your own firewall. Heck, most consumer Wifi AP/Router/Switch/Firewall devices have a default rule that simply discards all unsolicited packets that originate on the unsecured side.



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rob at lynxaudioservices dot com

Dealer for: AKG, Allen & Heath, Ashley, Astatic, Audix, Blue Microphones, CAD, Chauvet, Community, Countryman, Crown, DBX, Electro-Voice, FBT, Furman, Heil, Horizon, Intellistage, JBL, Lab Gruppen, Mid Atlantic, On Stage Stands, Pelican, Peterson Tuners, Presonus, ProCo, QSC, Radial, RCF, Sennheiser, Shure, SKB, Soundcraft, TC Electronics, Telex, Whirlwind and others
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