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Author Topic: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s  (Read 6646 times)

Ivan Beaver

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2016, 09:01:51 am »

I would love to have an Ampzilla from GAS, it was a Jim Bongiorno design.  One of most musical amps to come out of the late 70's IMHO.  Also an Amber model 70 is on my amp bucket list.
I want one of those for my collection also.

The problem is they go for SERIOUS money (for me anyway)

I would be happy with a dead one.  About half of the amps in my collection don't work anyway-----

But they are great memories for people that visit me
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Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

Ivan Beaver

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #21 on: February 07, 2016, 09:02:46 am »


You are very welcome to one but I think the postage cost from England would be ridiculous.


Steve.
Let me look into that :)
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A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

Steve M Smith

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #22 on: February 07, 2016, 09:21:50 am »


Let me look into that :)

OK.

Factor in that it's not just England.  I'm on the Isle of Wight which means an extra boat trip.

If you need it my post code is PO33 2SE.


Steve.
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John L Nobile

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2016, 03:49:47 pm »

I think our Martin B115 cabs had XLR connectors and I had a pair of Peavey speakers fro the 1990s which had XLR and 1-4" jacks.


Steve.

My Martin 115's had XLR connectors as well. This was in Canada. When I started in the biz I thought 1/4" was normal. XLR was considered "Pro"
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Chris Hindle

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2016, 08:26:12 am »

My Martin 115's had XLR connectors as well. This was in Canada. When I started in the biz I thought 1/4" was normal. XLR was considered "Pro"
I seem to recall the Martin Phillishave setup had XLR (one way) on the bottoms, XLR (other way) on the shavers, and 1/4" on the horns. At the time, I figured a pretty foolproof setup. Then God made a better class of fool. Oh well.
Chris.
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John L Nobile

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2016, 10:37:43 am »

I seem to recall the Martin Phillishave setup had XLR (one way) on the bottoms, XLR (other way) on the shavers, and 1/4" on the horns. At the time, I figured a pretty foolproof setup. Then God made a better class of fool. Oh well.
Chris.

That might be the way we were setup too. Definitely 1/4" on the highs but I can't remember whether the mids were opposite the bass.
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Chris Hindle

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2016, 12:33:08 pm »

That might be the way we were setup too. Definitely 1/4" on the highs but I can't remember whether the mids were opposite the bass.
That system was quite popular in the outskirts of the city, for many years. i mixed on many of them. Always wired the same. Often had CS-800 for power. Gotta admit, dumping the MK-111 or MD something and putting in my Yammi always made me smile. Good, dependable rigs.
Chris
« Last Edit: February 08, 2016, 12:35:31 pm by Chris Hindle »
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Stephen Kirby

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2016, 01:12:12 pm »

I would love to have an Ampzilla from GAS, it was a Jim Bongiorno design.  One of most musical amps to come out of the late 70's IMHO.  Also an Amber model 70 is on my amp bucket list.
Had a GAS preamp (Thalia I think) in the '70-80s until I got my ML7.  Good sounding and well made stuff.  I did bring home an Amber amp to try and it was a bit blurry.  That warm and fuzzy sound similar to late '70s Marantz.
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Tom Burgess

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #28 on: February 08, 2016, 01:25:54 pm »

I started with a 16 channel Studiomaster.



The company appears to be still in business: http://www.studiomaster.com/


Steve.
Hey, that's my old console!  Well, it looks just like it, anyway. :)  The Series One 16-4-2 was my first console of any consequence until it got stolen, I then got another and added the 4 channel expansion unit.  Oddly enough one of them had the L-R numbering, the other had R-L... can't remember which was which as that was WAY too many brain cells ago.  Seems like you could order a numbering kit for them, I always suspected that a previous owner had done exactly that.  Had lots of great gigs on those boards.
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #29 on: February 08, 2016, 07:00:34 pm »


You are very welcome to one but I think the postage cost from England would be ridiculous.


Steve.
You weren't kidding.

I just guessed at a weight of 50lbs and it looks like around $400 US from you.

That is a bit more than I am willing to part with.

Maybe the next time you come to the US you can bring it as carry on  ;D ;D ;D
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A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!
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