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Author Topic: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s  (Read 9291 times)

Stephen Kirby

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2016, 06:42:31 pm »

I had a 12-4 and always wondered where I could find the expansion module off to the left.  It actually worked well and sounded pretty good.  Better than anything else I could afford at the time.  Also used for recording and it definitely sounded better than the 1/4" 8 track Fostex R-R I had at the time.
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David Buckley

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2016, 07:54:38 pm »

RSD (and studiomaster, they were a bit confused) kit was the big step up from MM and HH.  It was the price point at which one got sweep EQ.  And where the lust moved to the TAC Scorpion.  Lots of very decent pub and small club type PAs had the whole RSD electronics chain.

The channels on the desk were numbered backwards; there was an the expansion port on the left that was under a plate held on by a couple of screws, and expansion carts were available as a four channel unit.
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2016, 10:11:27 pm »

RSD (and studiomaster, they were a bit confused) kit was the big step up from MM and HH.  It was the price point at which one got sweep EQ.  And where the lust moved to the TAC Scorpion.  Lots of very decent pub and small club type PAs had the whole RSD electronics chain.

The channels on the desk were numbered backwards; there was an the expansion port on the left that was under a plate held on by a couple of screws, and expansion carts were available as a four channel unit.
At least the rotary controls were not put on upside down-like the "professional" Kustom consoles I used to have.  I heard there were only 7 made, and at one time I had 3 of them.

There was a 5 band eq and the "0" position was at 6 oclock-not 12.

You still turned it to the right to boost-but the pointer was to the left.

It took some getting used to.

They also had a built in compressor on every channel and switchable high and low pass filters.

Pretty advanced at the time for a "club" type console.
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Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2016, 10:30:58 pm »

If you should every want to get ride of one of them-give me a buzz.

I would love to have one in my collection of vintage amplifiers
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Danley Sound Labs

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TrevorMilburn

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #14 on: February 06, 2016, 06:00:07 am »

Recording Studio Design later became Studiomaster.  The model number of this amplifier is 800b which implies 800 watts which I also assume is 400w per side,  Each amplifier's heatsink has eight 2N3773 transistors so it is feasible.
I haven't found out much about them other than something about the company wanting to bring the high quality of studio recording to live sound.
RSD was set up by Phil Dudderidge, Paul Dobson and Graham Blyth, building custom PA systems for the likes of Roy Wood's Wizzard, Mungo Jerry and Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel amongst others, with custom-built mixing consoles derived from a Bill Kelsey original design. Phil & Graham went on to create Soundcraft and Phil is now Executive chairman of Focusrite plc but before all this he toured with Led Zeppelin, worked as sound guy for Implosion at the Roundhouse in London and also worked for Hiwatt. There are a couple of articles about him here:
http://www.mixonline.com/news/profiles/phil-dudderidge-qa/366249
http://www.mixonline.com/news/profiles/second-british-invasion-uk-technology-us-live-sound-market/374211
Hope this helps.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2016, 12:42:53 pm by TrevorMilburn »
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #15 on: February 06, 2016, 08:44:26 pm »

Thanks for the extra info.


Steve.
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #16 on: February 07, 2016, 05:00:18 am »

If you should every want to get ride of one of them-give me a buzz.

I would love to have one in my collection of vintage amplifiers

I would love to have an Ampzilla from GAS, it was a Jim Bongiorno design.  One of most musical amps to come out of the late 70's IMHO.  Also an Amber model 70 is on my amp bucket list.

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman
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Mike Diack

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #17 on: February 07, 2016, 05:25:34 am »

I'm old enough to remember having a mixture of 1/4" jacks and XLRs for speaker connections.
The use of XLR3Ms for speaker outputs on amps was pretty much par for the course "Down Under" in the
'70->'80s. XLR3Ms were also used on speaker cabs so speaker cables were XLR3F->XLR3F (using heavy
duty unscreened cable). Reasonably goof proof. The NL4 had yet to be invented and all the alternatives
(like jacks, binding posts etc) were far worse.
M
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #18 on: February 07, 2016, 08:44:55 am »


If you should every want to get ride of one of them-give me a buzz.

I would love to have one in my collection of vintage amplifiers


You are very welcome to one but I think the postage cost from England would be ridiculous.


Steve.
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #19 on: February 07, 2016, 08:51:34 am »


The use of XLR3Ms for speaker outputs on amps was pretty much par for the course "Down Under" in the
'70->'80s.

I think our Martin B115 cabs had XLR connectors and I had a pair of Peavey speakers fro the 1990s which had XLR and 1-4" jacks.


Steve.
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