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Author Topic: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s  (Read 6954 times)

Steve M Smith

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Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« on: June 15, 2015, 06:44:56 pm »

If it is ever 1977 again, I'm going to use these amps.  My son found them at a nearby house with a 'help yourself' sign next to them.  It would have been rude not to take them!

Recording Studio Design later became Studiomaster.  The model number of this amplifier is 800b which implies 800 watts which I also assume is 400w per side,  Each amplifier's heatsink has eight 2N3773 transistors so it is feasible.

I haven't found out much about them other than something about the company wanting to bring the high quality of studio recording to live sound.



Speaker outputs on male XLR.  Input unbalanced on XLR.  Power input is also on XLR (but a version intended for high voltage) There is a big fan on the back but if they are rack mounted, gaps will need to be left above and below as the only other ventilation is in the top and bottom panels.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2015, 06:48:20 pm by Steve M Smith »
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Jim McKeveny

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2016, 11:10:30 am »

If it is ever 1977 again, I'm going to use these amps.  My son found them at a nearby house with a 'help yourself' sign next to them.  It would have been rude not to take them!

Recording Studio Design later became Studiomaster.  The model number of this amplifier is 800b which implies 800 watts which I also assume is 400w per side,  Each amplifier's heatsink has eight 2N3773 transistors so it is feasible.

I haven't found out much about them other than something about the company wanting to bring the high quality of studio recording to live sound.



Speaker outputs on male XLR.  Input unbalanced on XLR.  Power input is also on XLR (but a version intended for high voltage) There is a big fan on the back but if they are rack mounted, gaps will need to be left above and below as the only other ventilation is in the top and bottom panels.

I saw the US version of these at a music store in Hempstead, NY around that time. Even though I was pretty young and green to audio I recall thinking that the use of XLR on the in's and out's could easily end up badly....
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2016, 01:28:14 pm »

I'm old enough to remember having a mixture of 1/4" jacks and XLRs for speaker connections.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2016, 02:01:00 pm »

If it is ever 1977 again, I'm going to use these amps.  My son found them at a nearby house with a 'help yourself' sign next to them.  It would have been rude not to take them!

Recording Studio Design later became Studiomaster.  The model number of this amplifier is 800b which implies 800 watts which I also assume is 400w per side,  Each amplifier's heatsink has eight 2N3773 transistors so it is feasible.

I haven't found out much about them other than something about the company wanting to bring the high quality of studio recording to live sound.


Speaker outputs on male XLR.  Input unbalanced on XLR.  Power input is also on XLR (but a version intended for high voltage) There is a big fan on the back but if they are rack mounted, gaps will need to be left above and below as the only other ventilation is in the top and bottom panels.
My DIY amp built in early '70s used 8ea 2n3773 per channel making 250W at 8 ohms... So perhaps they are talking about 2x400W at 4 ohms?

JR

PS: Slow but robust power devices. My amp still worked last time I turned it on.
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John L Nobile

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2016, 02:06:58 pm »

Used to have a Studiomaster board. Whatever became of that company?
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Steve M Smith

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Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2016, 02:22:57 pm »

I started with a 16 channel Studiomaster.



The company appears to be still in business: http://www.studiomaster.com/


Steve.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2016, 02:44:30 pm by Steve M Smith »
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2016, 06:47:00 pm »

I'm old enough to remember having a mixture of 1/4" jacks and XLRs for speaker connections.
I used to use that exact same input configuration for my speakers.

The XLRs handle more current and are easy to extend-just like mic cables.
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Ivan Beaver
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2016, 06:53:54 pm »

I started with a 16 channel Studiomaster.



The company appears to be still in business: http://www.studiomaster.com/


Steve.
That was when the company made good products.

A couple of decades ago they were making crap-using the same name.

Not sure if it was the same company.

My first large format console was a StudioMixer II.  It was supposedly designed by one of the engineers that formed Studiomaster.

It was 32x8 and almost 8' wide.  You can see it in this photo in the middle.  Very heavy and also hard to get a decent mix on.  My 24x4 biamp and Kelsey mixers were much easier to mix on-even though they had a wimpier eq section.

I also hated the way the channels (on the studiomasters) were labeled backwards.  But I assume that was done so that when they were expanded (you simply mounted blocks of additional channels to the main console) they would be correctly numbered.
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Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

Steve M Smith

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2016, 02:40:37 am »

I also hated the way the channels (on the studiomasters) were labeled backwards.
That actually made sense to me.  Why do we (generally) start at the channels the furthest away from the master fadeers?

Obviously, they are just numbers and made no difference to the actual way we did things.


Steve.
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2016, 08:44:26 am »

That actually made sense to me.  Why do we (generally) start at the channels the furthest away from the master fadeers?

Obviously, they are just numbers and made no difference to the actual way we did things.


Steve.
I read from left to right.

And if you were to ask anybody to list the numbers 1-24, they would start on the left and go to the right.

Agreed it is just numbers-and we usually put tape over them anyway.
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Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!
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