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Author Topic: Nuremburg Ralley PA ?  (Read 14223 times)

Jerome Malsack

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Re: Nuremburg Ralley PA ?
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2014, 06:55:00 pm »

I tried to google  1936 olympics sound system and found a reference to a 500 watt system but the site was listed as possibly hazardous to computers. 

Found it also difficult to read because of the photos and backgrounds used. 
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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Nuremburg Ralley PA ?
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2014, 10:39:41 pm »

That's not a horn.

THAT'S is a horn:
MAN ! you scared my wittle horns, my wittle horns , my wittle horns. They are in hiding.
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Nuremburg Ralley PA ?
« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2014, 07:37:29 am »

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Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

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Mike Diack

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Re: Nuremburg Ralley PA ?
« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2014, 02:52:34 pm »

Looks like big horns to me :)  They worked back then and still work today.  Something most manufacturers have forgotten.
Price of amplifier watts plummeted, whilst labour and transport got expensive, and we all got older and less enthusiastic about carrying a concert "W" bin up the stairs. I still reckon the sound of a classic horn loaded 4 way beats a line array any day. Would still love to find a close shot of the horn in that video that JG put up.
M
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Nuremburg Ralley PA ?
« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2014, 04:13:35 pm »

. Would still love to find a close shot of the horn in that video that JG put up.
M
Me to.

I knew a guy years ago that had some HUGE cobalt magnet horn drivers.  He said they were from the 30s or 40s.

I never heard them, but they were REAL impressive looking.

It makes you want to back in time to hear such events.

When they invent the time machine-the first place I want to go is the original Woodstock.

Then I want to visit some of my gigs from the 80s-to see what they really sounded like.

I have a feeling I would be sorely dissappointed-given my current "reference".

But hey-everybody was happy-I got paid and got more work-so it could not have been "that" bad----------
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A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Nuremburg Ralley PA ?
« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2014, 04:39:24 pm »

In 1920 Western Electric built a 12 foot wooden horn on the roof of their West street offices and all notables who sailed in or out of NY were greeted by the booming voice of someone from WE. Well not every time. One afternoon as the showman Roxy was sailing home from Europe he was greeted too late by by a blast that rocked the Palisades ... "My God, he's gone by...".    ;D

====
There were some serious horns behind the screen of the early sound movies. While horns actually predate amplification where there were early architectural horns built into speaking tubes so a human voice could address a larger area while there only so much acoustic gain available from that.

Electrical amplification only became practical with the development of the vacuum tube and NF circuits.

JR
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Nuremburg Ralley PA ?
« Reply #16 on: December 10, 2014, 05:45:19 pm »

Electrical amplification only became practical with the development of the vacuum tube and NF circuits.

I think a fair amount was possible with carbon microphones and a decent power supply.

When I was quite a bit younger than now, I used to have a turntable in my bedroom with a ceramic cartridge connected via a transformer to a loudspeaker.  Not a great amount of volume but enough to listen to records at night when it was quiet.  No amplifier required. 


Steve.
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Jonathan Goodall

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Re: Nuremburg Ralley PA ?
« Reply #17 on: December 10, 2014, 06:33:46 pm »

I actually remember a history teacher from back in my days at high school,  talking about some of the speeches (in regards to the hype and getting everyone riled up).  One thing I clearly remember from that class was the comments made about the speaker system (I can't provide any links so I guess this is only hearsay).  According to the teacher,  the speakers had special loose louvers on the front that were designed to CREATE distortion, esp at the loud bits. The idea being to make it harder to understand and the masses tended to follow along with the loyal supporters up front (plus, distortion gets you angry? ).
Like I said,  can't prove it,  but I vividly remember that for some reason.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Nuremburg Ralley PA ?
« Reply #18 on: December 10, 2014, 06:38:47 pm »

I think a fair amount was possible with carbon microphones and a decent power supply.

When I was quite a bit younger than now, I used to have a turntable in my bedroom with a ceramic cartridge connected via a transformer to a loudspeaker.  Not a great amount of volume but enough to listen to records at night when it was quiet.  No amplifier required. 


Steve.

Yes but... the vacuum tube "and" very importantly NF (negative feedback) delivered accurate amplification that could be cascaded in series, like for the cross country telephone system. Imagine how bad a telephone signal would sound without flat, low distortion amplifiers.

JR

PS: My record player when I was a young puke had a 4 tube (Lafayette Radio) amplifier.But my dad was a recording engineer for RCA records until the mid 1950s (RIP).

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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Nuremburg Ralley PA ?
« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2014, 06:46:37 pm »

I actually remember a history teacher from back in my days at high school,  talking about some of the speeches (in regards to the hype and getting everyone riled up).  One thing I clearly remember from that class was the comments made about the speaker system (I can't provide any links so I guess this is only hearsay).  According to the teacher,  the speakers had special loose louvers on the front that were designed to CREATE distortion, esp at the loud bits. The idea being to make it harder to understand and the masses tended to follow along with the loyal supporters up front (plus, distortion gets you angry? ).
Like I said,  can't prove it,  but I vividly remember that for some reason.

?? You sure that isn't common core history??

Here's a picture from the 1920 republican convention (same system was used at the later democrat convention). These were indoor SR, I vaguely recall reading about outdoor SR attempted after WWI for some of the huge parades celebrating armistice. Another technology milestone was Hitler using a wire recorder to makes speeches without being in the same place and same time. Perhaps useful in a war when several countries are trying to kill you. 

JR
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