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Author Topic: [Solved] P series/type rack panels similar to Audiopyle's?  (Read 1030 times)

Thomas Le

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Does anyone know any place that sells P series/type connector panels with the holes drilled, like Audiopyle's D Series panels? Or am I going to have to drill them by hand on blank panels?

Reason I'm asking is because I'm making panels for plugging into my wireless mic rack and I have some spare P series male XLR connectors that I'm trying to put to good use.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2014, 03:47:21 pm by Thomas Le »
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Bob Leonard

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Re: P series/type rack panels similar to Audiopyle's?
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2014, 12:00:20 am »

You don't drill chassis holes. You drill a pilot hole and then punch the hole with a Greenlee hole punch. Drilling large holes in thin metal is a good way to get seriously hurt.
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Tim Weaver

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Re: P series/type rack panels similar to Audiopyle's?
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2014, 01:13:08 am »

Does anyone know any place that sells P series/type connector panels with the holes drilled, like Audiopyle's D Series panels? Or am I going to have to drill them by hand on blank panels?

Reason I'm asking is because I'm making panels for plugging into my wireless mic rack and I have some spare P series male XLR connectors that I'm trying to put to good use.

Call full compass
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Richard Turner

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Re: P series/type rack panels similar to Audiopyle's?
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2014, 05:43:31 am »

If you can't find what you want off the shelf look into having someone with a plasma cut table or better yet a water jet machine cut them out for you. Certainly someone else somewhaere in the word is looking for the exact same thing.


Patent the design liscence it to a manufacturer....be rich ......
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Thomas Le

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Re: P series/type rack panels similar to Audiopyle's?
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2014, 10:24:52 am »

Thank you Bob for the tip, I admit I had no idea where to start. Looks like it's a trip to my local Grainger store!

You don't drill chassis holes. You drill a pilot hole and then punch the hole with a Greenlee hole punch. Drilling large holes in thin metal is a good way to get seriously hurt.
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Chris Jensen

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Re: P series/type rack panels similar to Audiopyle's?
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2014, 12:20:12 pm »

I would try one of these two companies.  I have obtained quotes from both and it seems like very little to pay for cut and loaded panels. 

http://www.redco.com/Redco-Custom-Panel-Designer.html
http://www.panelauthority.com/index.html
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David Parker

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Re: P series/type rack panels similar to Audiopyle's?
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2014, 12:25:50 pm »

Does anyone know any place that sells P series/type connector panels with the holes drilled, like Audiopyle's D Series panels? Or am I going to have to drill them by hand on blank panels?

Reason I'm asking is because I'm making panels for plugging into my wireless mic rack and I have some spare P series male XLR connectors that I'm trying to put to good use.
a lot of electricians own hole punches for sheet metal. As bob said, you drill a pilot hole, and the punch has two side, and a bolt pulls them together punching the hole
http://www.zoro.com/g/00054919/k-G2535653?utm_source=google_shopping&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Google_Shopping_Feed&kpid=G2535653&gclid=CPOfiuKH1L4CFckWMgodySQALw

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Thomas Le

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Re: P series/type rack panels similar to Audiopyle's?
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2014, 12:42:29 pm »

I would try one of these two companies.  I have obtained quotes from both and it seems like very little to pay for cut and loaded panels. 

http://www.redco.com/Redco-Custom-Panel-Designer.html
http://www.panelauthority.com/index.html

Unfortunately Redco doesn't do P series/type holes. Panel Authority looks promising after looking at their sample pictures, will have to contact them to be sure...

a lot of electricians own hole punches for sheet metal. As bob said, you drill a pilot hole, and the punch has two side, and a bolt pulls them together punching the hole
http://www.zoro.com/g/00054919/k-G2535653?utm_source=google_shopping&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Google_Shopping_Feed&kpid=G2535653&gclid=CPOfiuKH1L4CFckWMgodySQALw



Thanks for the link, will look into this further.
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Jonathan Kok

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Re: P series/type rack panels similar to Audiopyle's?
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2014, 01:29:26 pm »

Unfortunately Redco doesn't do P series/type holes. Panel Authority looks promising after looking at their sample pictures, will have to contact them to be sure...

Thanks for the link, will look into this further.
Frankly, if you're trying to save money by re-using 'P-style' connectors, custom panels probably aren't the way you want to go. After all, a Neutrik DL series connector is only $3 a pop.
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TJ (Tom) Cornish

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Re: P series/type rack panels similar to Audiopyle's?
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2014, 02:25:19 pm »

You don't drill chassis holes. You drill a pilot hole and then punch the hole with a Greenlee hole punch. Drilling large holes in thin metal is a good way to get seriously hurt.
Step drills run at a low RPM are designed for sheet metal work and produce excellent hole quality.  If you are doing a lot of a particular size, the punch may be faster, but a punch kit is expensive.  Step drills are also expensive - particularly for sizes above 1" or so, but may be more widely useful.

An example here (but not necessarily a specific recommendation):
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200627853_200627853?cm_mmc=Google-pla-_-Power%20Tools-_-Drill%20Bits-_-43067&ci_src=17588969&ci_sku=43067&ci_src=17588969&ci_sku=43067&gclid=CKaak_ah1L4CFahAMgodiVwAbQ
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