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Author Topic: IP Addresses & Routers - Help, I am an Audio Dummy  (Read 2566 times)

Rufus Crowder

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IP Addresses & Routers - Help, I am an Audio Dummy
« on: February 17, 2014, 12:45:21 pm »

I am confused on how to choose an IP address when setting up my Behringer X32 wireless connection using a typical router to do so.  I did a search and came to a previous post by Scott Wagner:

To summarize the TCP/IP Networking for Audio Dummies:
1.  Use the 192.168.[0-255].[1-254] address space
2.  Use 255.255.255.0 for all subnet masks
3.  Pick a number for the third octet to define your network (192.168.1 is a standard choice).
4.  Pick a number for the fourth octete to define each device (192.168.1.[1-254]).
5.  The "default gateway address" is whatever address you've assigned to your router (or 0.0.0.0 if you don't have a router).
6.  Remember that most audio networks are switched (instead of routed), since it's best to isolate production networks from the rest of the world.
7.  When deploying wireless, always enable the security to keep the punters out of your production network.

If you stick to these simple constraints, anyone can easily configure networks without ever having to understand binary (base2) mathmatics.


I used the address of 192.168.1.2 and this worked until I got to the venue and all of our devices (iPads, MacBooks, iPhones) were either loosing the connection or not connecting at all.  I tried 192.168.1.10 which did not work but tried 192.168.1.8 which worked.  Is there some sort of mathematical calculation that needs to be taken into consideration when forming these addresses?
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Ted Christensen

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Re: IP Addresses & Routers - Help, I am an Audio Dummy
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2014, 12:47:03 pm »

I am confused on how to choose an IP address when setting up my Behringer X32 wireless connection using a typical router to do so.  I did a search and came to a previous post by Scott Wagner:

To summarize the TCP/IP Networking for Audio Dummies:
1.  Use the 192.168.[0-255].[1-254] address space
2.  Use 255.255.255.0 for all subnet masks
3.  Pick a number for the third octet to define your network (192.168.1 is a standard choice).
4.  Pick a number for the fourth octete to define each device (192.168.1.[1-254]).
5.  The "default gateway address" is whatever address you've assigned to your router (or 0.0.0.0 if you don't have a router).
6.  Remember that most audio networks are switched (instead of routed), since it's best to isolate production networks from the rest of the world.
7.  When deploying wireless, always enable the security to keep the punters out of your production network.

If you stick to these simple constraints, anyone can easily configure networks without ever having to understand binary (base2) mathmatics.


I used the address of 192.168.1.2 and this worked until I got to the venue and all of our devices (iPads, MacBooks, iPhones) were either loosing the connection or not connecting at all.  I tried 192.168.1.10 which did not work but tried 192.168.1.8 which worked.  Is there some sort of mathematical calculation that needs to be taken into consideration when forming these addresses?

Im guessing you are using 2.4ghz band?  Try 5ghz band only.
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Brian Jojade

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Re: IP Addresses & Routers - Help, I am an Audio Dummy
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2014, 12:54:00 pm »

I used the address of 192.168.1.2 and this worked until I got to the venue and all of our devices (iPads, MacBooks, iPhones) were either loosing the connection or not connecting at all.  I tried 192.168.1.10 which did not work but tried 192.168.1.8 which worked.  Is there some sort of mathematical calculation that needs to be taken into consideration when forming these addresses?

If you are creating your own network, the selection of addresses won't make a difference.  If you're connecting to an existing network, then you would need to know the specs of that network to make sure things will work correctly.  If you're connecting to another network, it's likely that there was another device with the same address you tried to use, thus it won't work.
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: IP Addresses & Routers - Help, I am an Audio Dummy
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2014, 01:28:13 pm »

Rufus, it sounds like there was a wireless network with the same address in the venue.  Pick a different number for the 3rd octet, say 192.168.13.xxx
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Rob Spence

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Re: IP Addresses & Routers - Help, I am an Audio Dummy
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2014, 01:48:12 pm »

Rufus, it sounds like there was a wireless network with the same address in the venue.  Pick a different number for the 3rd octet, say 192.168.13.xxx

+1

Rufus, what are all of your devices and what addresses did you choose for them?

I never use the "standard" addresses because there are thousands of people who do.

Some things to choose are the network number, the router's address, the mixer's address and very important, the range of addresses used by DHCP (those addresses handed out by the router to the iPads or laptops you use).

I choose a network number up in the middle of the range, say for instance, 66 or some other number between 1-254 that means something to me.
I set my mixers starting at address 101, or perhaps if I had an X32 and a 01v96 I might choose 132 for the X32 and 196 for the Yamaha. It makes it easy for me to remember.
I set my router at 250-254 depending.
I set my DHCP range at 51-90 for example. Give it 20 or so addresses to give out. For a small audio network, 20 is plenty.

I agree with only using the 5gHz band if you can. The 2.4gHz band is too crowded.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
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Rufus Crowder

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Re: IP Addresses & Routers - Help, I am an Audio Dummy
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2014, 02:39:55 pm »

+1

Rufus, what are all of your devices and what addresses did you choose for them?

I never use the "standard" addresses because there are thousands of people who do.

Some things to choose are the network number, the router's address, the mixer's address and very important, the range of addresses used by DHCP (those addresses handed out by the router to the iPads or laptops you use).

I choose a network number up in the middle of the range, say for instance, 66 or some other number between 1-254 that means something to me.
I set my mixers starting at address 101, or perhaps if I had an X32 and a 01v96 I might choose 132 for the X32 and 196 for the Yamaha. It makes it easy for me to remember.
I set my router at 250-254 depending.
I set my DHCP range at 51-90 for example. Give it 20 or so addresses to give out. For a small audio network, 20 is plenty.

I agree with only using the 5gHz band if you can. The 2.4gHz band is too crowded.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
All, I have recently installed an X32 Rack into my system with an S16 Digital Snake and have an X32 Mixer as stand by or for use when a control surface is needed for my band's application.  My entire (currently 8 piece) band uses in-ears, DI's on all keyboards, pedalboards, etc.  I turned off the 2.4GHz radio in my ASUS AC66U Router as it was causing havoc with my Line 6 mics and guitar body packs.  The Apple Airport Express that I use to stream music is also a 2.4GHz and 5GHz device but has not caused me any issues to date.  I wish that I could turn off the 2.4GHz radio in that too but I could not find that option in the Apple Utility application that I saw mentioned in another post. 

I love this set-up but like many, am still old school when it comes to mixing and if asked of all of us, would still prefer to mix on a desk out front.  Many of the corporate functions and weddings that we play for never allow space for that anymore and place chairs and tables directly in front of speaker stacks.  Sound boards are typically placed on the sides of stages with the sound engineer making repeated trips out front to check the sound.  After getting repeated requests from many wedding coordinators like "do you have to have that there?" to "can you put those speakers on the back wall or over there in the corner?" or "the last band that we had did not have that mixing board in the way like that...", I decided to seek other solutions to mixing.  We have incorporated iPhones, iPads, and one PM16 Personal Monitor in our set-up and everything works quite well with the exception of the router and X32 connection issue that I had last Saturday.  After I changed the IP address (kept plugging in random numbers) in the X32, all of our devices stayed connected throughout the evening.  I was really uncomfortable guessing an address until something worked hence my question to the community for some logical explanation of how this all works.   
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Andrew Hollis

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Re: IP Addresses & Routers - Help, I am an Audio Dummy
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2014, 05:04:17 pm »

Rob Spence has it, the you-missed-a-spot is you've mixed DHCP and fixed IP addressing. These are the two types of IP addressing methods. You can't just pick your own IP address on a piece of gear if it is attached to a DHCP router (it likely is in your case), because the DHCP server may have already given that address away, thus you have a conflict.

I couldn't find the word DHCP in the X32 manual, so it may only allow fixed addressing. Thus in your router you need to make sure that that address is reserved. See page 31 in the link below. I always do DHCP reservation on all the devices that I control on a network, otherwise the addresses may change, and that messes up some devices, especially if it has a web interface. That's what happened to you when you turned it off and brought it to the venue.

The Airport Utility manual is in the Help menu of the software and an old one is here. Forcing to Wireless N 5 GHz is in the Wireless tab, you may also want to give the 5 GHz another name so you know you're on that one, all on page 20-23.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2014, 05:15:22 pm by Andrew Hollis »
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: IP Addresses & Routers - Help, I am an Audio Dummy
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2014, 06:07:41 pm »

Rob Spence has it, the you-missed-a-spot is you've mixed DHCP and fixed IP addressing. These are the two types of IP addressing methods. You can't just pick your own IP address on a piece of gear if it is attached to a DHCP router (it likely is in your case), because the DHCP server may have already given that address away, thus you have a conflict.

I couldn't find the word DHCP in the X32 manual, so it may only allow fixed addressing. Thus in your router you need to make sure that that address is reserved. See page 31 in the link below. I always do DHCP reservation on all the devices that I control on a network, otherwise the addresses may change, and that messes up some devices, especially if it has a web interface. That's what happened to you when you turned it off and brought it to the venue.

The Airport Utility manual is in the Help menu of the software and an old one is here. Forcing to Wireless N 5 GHz is in the Wireless tab, you may also want to give the 5 GHz another name so you know you're on that one, all on page 20-23.

If you check the X32 manual, the reason it doesn't mention DHCP is because YOU SET THE ADDRESS and other network settings.

One or more devices, probably including his access point, had addresses conflicting with a house WiFi system.
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Tim Tyler

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Re: IP Addresses & Routers - Help, I am an Audio Dummy
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2014, 09:14:56 pm »

Rufus -

You will never be able to have a stable connection in the 2.4 range while using Line 6 digital mics.  Been there.  You must go to 5 gig.  I don't think you will need to do anything out of the ordinary with your addresses. 

A search on "Line 6 digital wireless" on this forum should show you this has been previously discussed.  Can't comment on the effect your other wireless devices may be having...

Cheers,

-Tim T
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Mark McFarlane

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Re: IP Addresses & Routers - Help, I am an Audio Dummy
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2014, 08:22:02 am »

Rob Spence has it, the you-missed-a-spot is you've mixed DHCP and fixed IP addressing. These are the two types of IP addressing methods. You can't just pick your own IP address on a piece of gear if it is attached to a DHCP router (it likely is in your case), because the DHCP server may have already given that address away, thus you have a conflict.

I couldn't find the word DHCP in the X32 manual, so it may only allow fixed addressing. Thus in your router you need to make sure that that address is reserved. See page 31 in the link below. I always do DHCP reservation on all the devices that I control on a network, otherwise the addresses may change, and that messes up some devices, especially if it has a web interface. That's what happened to you when you turned it off and brought it to the venue.

The Airport Utility manual is in the Help menu of the software and an old one is here. Forcing to Wireless N 5 GHz is in the Wireless tab, you may also want to give the 5 GHz another name so you know you're on that one, all on page 20-23.

Besides reserving IP addresses, with Airport WAPs (and many others) you can also reserve a range of addresses for the DHCP server to give out.  e.g. set your X32 at 192.168.0.101 and tell the Airport to only hand out address between 192.168.0.5 and 192.168.0.20.

Don't use the 2009 manual link as a reference, it is from 2009 and Apple has changed the software a dozen times since then.
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