ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Down

Author Topic: Meyer JM-1  (Read 3560 times)

Jim McKeveny

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 587
Re: Meyer JM-1
« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2014, 07:57:26 am »

This helps explain the low nominal crossover frequency:

www.US8406445.pdf.

Some well placed response bumps and grinds between drive units, coupled with critical spacing and horn wall design, permits extended pattern control. This probably comes at the expense of ultimate output.

Thanks Jon. I answered my own question.
Logged

Jon Arneson

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 7
    • Meyer Sound
Re: Meyer JM-1
« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2014, 04:10:12 pm »

This helps explain the low nominal crossover frequency:

www.US8406445.pdf.

Some well placed response bumps and grinds between drive units, coupled with critical spacing and horn wall design, permits extended pattern control. This probably comes at the expense of ultimate output.

Thanks Jon. I answered my own question.


Jim, sorry about that - I thought you were asking if we had specific patents on IM distortion. I should have linked to this one.

http://www.google.com/patents/US8406445


Jon
« Last Edit: February 17, 2014, 01:46:56 pm by Jon Arneson »
Logged
Meyer Sound

DavidTurner

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 87
Re: Meyer JM-1
« Reply #22 on: February 16, 2014, 02:37:36 am »

Hi Art:

In room A at Soundcheck in Nashville (which is their largest rehearsal hall) - at Meyer's introduction of the JM1 to the Nashville touring community. It was a local cover band being mixed by one of Meyer's engineers. I don't know the relative humidity, but since it was in the South, probably pretty high. I'm guessing an SPL of about 106 db at FOH - which was about 50' from stage. I walked the room and the coverage was really good throughout. Haven't heard them in a big room or at great distance.

The act I tour with just rehearsed in that same room with the same rig. I do monitors and I didn't get out front to listen, but our FOH engineer was happy with the rig.

David,

At what distance, SPL and relative humidity percentage?

Art
Logged

Ivan Beaver

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3312
  • Atlanta GA
Re: Meyer JM-1
« Reply #23 on: February 16, 2014, 08:24:59 am »

I'm guessing an SPL of about 106 db at FOH - which was about 50' from stage.
Stating a SPL "number" without any other metric is almost worthless.

A-C-Fast-Slow-Peak etc makes all the difference.

I have MEASURED a difference of 30dB using different weightings/time of the same sound at the same position.

YES IT MATTERS!!!!!!!!!!

Yes you may "know" what you think you are saying-but it doesn't mean anything to somebody else if their "standard" is using a different metric.

Just sayin'
Logged
A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

DavidTurner

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 87
Re: Meyer JM-1
« Reply #24 on: February 17, 2014, 11:47:33 am »

OK, Mr. Beaver:

Based on my 30 years experience of mixing FOH at a comfortable level for me that usually works out to be about 106 dba measured with a Radio Shack meter set to slow response time, I would guess that it was about 106 dbA  JEEEZ. HE asked and I said I'm GUESSING....

BTW It really did sound good, but I suppose that, since I did not take a measurement rig in and document all the parameters, my opinion of how it sounded is meaningless to loudspeaker designers....BUT, I made no claim other than it "sounded really good to me."



Stating a SPL "number" without any other metric is almost worthless.

A-C-Fast-Slow-Peak etc makes all the difference.

I have MEASURED a difference of 30dB using different weightings/time of the same sound at the same position.

YES IT MATTERS!!!!!!!!!!

Yes you may "know" what you think you are saying-but it doesn't mean anything to somebody else if their "standard" is using a different metric.

Just sayin'
« Last Edit: February 17, 2014, 12:08:42 pm by DavidTurner »
Logged

Ivan Beaver

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3312
  • Atlanta GA
Re: Meyer JM-1
« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2014, 12:07:47 pm »

OK, Mr. Beaver:

Based on my 30 years experience of mixing FOH at a comfortable level for me that usually works out to be about 106 dba measured with a Radio Shack meter set to slow response time, I would guess that it was about 106 dbA  JEEEZ. HE asked and I said I'm GUESSING....
Not to be picky but the A scale was never intended to be used above around 80dB-but that never stopped anybody-using something the way it was intended to be used.

I know MANY MANY people that use C weighted fast and their "guesses" are based on that "base knowledge" they have in THEIR heads and THEIR reference.

Often the difference between A slow and C fast can be 20dB-not exactly a 'little bit".

Since you did not use a weighting or state what "your" reference-how is anybody to know?

Again-maybe YOU know-but others have no idea-if they use a different reference.

I would argue that many different situations could be setup and fool even experienced sound guys with regards to SPL level.  Just change the distortion a little bit and it sounds louder than it actually is.

I bet it would be easy to fool guys by at least 10dB if you were to "pull them off the street cold" and ask them what the SPL was-----------

And JUST TO get picky- 106dB mean ONLY ONE thing.  That is the difference between 2 levels.  Without knowing what the other level is-there is no way to know what 106dB  actually refers to.

The dB is a RATIO-NOT a absolute value-like a volt or a foot or a gallon.
Logged
A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

DavidTurner

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 87
Re: Meyer JM-1
« Reply #26 on: February 17, 2014, 12:12:04 pm »

Now that we have all had our physics lesson for the day:

Someone asked for an opinion and I gave it. Sorry it did not meet your criteria. GOODBYE!

Not to be picky but the A scale was never intended to be used above around 80dB-but that never stopped anybody-using something the way it was intended to be used.

I know MANY MANY people that use C weighted fast and their "guesses" are based on that "base knowledge" they have in THEIR heads and THEIR reference.

Often the difference between A slow and C fast can be 20dB-not exactly a 'little bit".

Since you did not use a weighting or state what "your" reference-how is anybody to know?

Again-maybe YOU know-but others have no idea-if they use a different reference.

I would argue that many different situations could be setup and fool even experienced sound guys with regards to SPL level.  Just change the distortion a little bit and it sounds louder than it actually is.

I bet it would be easy to fool guys by at least 10dB if you were to "pull them off the street cold" and ask them what the SPL was-----------

And JUST TO get picky- 106dB mean ONLY ONE thing.  That is the difference between 2 levels.  Without knowing what the other level is-there is no way to know what 106dB  actually refers to.

The dB is a RATIO-NOT a absolute value-like a volt or a foot or a gallon.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2014, 12:26:49 pm by DavidTurner »
Logged

Ivan Beaver

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3312
  • Atlanta GA
Re: Meyer JM-1
« Reply #27 on: February 17, 2014, 12:27:27 pm »

Someone asked for an opinion and I gave it. Sorry it did not meat your criteria. GOODBYE!
It is not my "criteria".  Just pointing out that what appears to one person can be something completely different to another person-depending on what their reference is.

And just trying to accurate.

In this business all kinds of statements get "thrown around" usually with nothing to back them up or have little meaning (and often wrong) on their own.

It is important to have details-YES IT DOES MATTER.  At least to some people.

To others who don't understand or care if it it correct or not-then "anything goes"----

Maybe if you paycheck had the same numbers on it-but the sign was changed to pesos instead of dollars it would make a difference to  you.  You still got paid X amount o funits-they are just a different value.
Logged
A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

DavidTurner

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 87
Re: Meyer JM-1
« Reply #28 on: February 17, 2014, 02:29:04 pm »


It is important to have details-YES IT DOES MATTER.  At least to some people.


What part of the phrase "I'm guessing" do you not understand? Since it was, admittedly, a guess, there was no accuracy implied and none should be inferred.  Again, I made no claim other than "I've heard them sound really good." Then, when asked, I tried my best to describe the conditions under which I made that assessment. Would I have been more accurate to say "at a moderately loud yet not uncomfortable level?" What would have been the reference for that? An uncomfortable level for me might not be loud enough for you or vice versa.

Logged

Jim McKeveny

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 587
Re: Meyer JM-1
« Reply #29 on: February 17, 2014, 03:01:18 pm »

Well. This has been a fun trip.

Thank you to all contributors, esp. JA from Meyer.

I thought my initial query was reasonably innocent, but apparently it caused some unforeseen friction downstream. I think we should blame it all on Winter 2014 weather..

Regards to all!!

JMK
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Up
 


Page created in 0.104 seconds with 23 queries.