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Author Topic: Need to get internet from shop to home  (Read 3630 times)

Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2014, 12:57:42 pm »

Just to argue -- no, electricity cannot see the color, but with CAT cable, the colors are NOT twisted exactly the same, and there are subtle differences between the pairs....so use the right ones in the right holes on the connectors...

Ed Walters

Agreed; I do understand there are subtle differences. Not sure what I was getting at with my last comment.  ???
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Stop confusing the issue with facts and logic!

Mike Reigh

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #31 on: January 17, 2014, 02:44:56 pm »

Let me say that I would much prefer linking the 2 buildings via a wire than going wireless, even if you do go wireless once you're indoors.  But, I have used this setup before outdoors, and it works great.  My guess is that if you set up a WAP inside your metal building, getting much of any signal at the house isn't going to happen - the building is probably acting as a bit of a Faraday cage, and knocking down the majority of any signal.

Ubiquiti Bullet M5:  http://www.ubnt.com/airmax#bulletm
Ubiquiti POE adapters:  http://www.ubnt.com/airmax#poe  (I think it's the 24v version, but read the M5 spec)

For antennas, I have used this one but it is an omni antenna:
http://www.l-com.com/wireless-antenna-58-ghz-8-dbi-omnidirectional-wireless-lan-antenna

In your situation, I'd probably want something a bit more directional.  Lcom makes some, as does Ubiquiti.

http://www.l-com.com/wireless-antenna-58-ghz-wifi-antennas
http://www.ubnt.com/airmax#airMaxAntennas

In total, you're probably looking at $200 or so in parts.



THIS!!

I've installed my share of Ubiqiti equipment and it rocks.  If you need NLOS, they have a 900 Mhz solution that propagates through trees fairly well, even at half a mile.  Some come with a dish, but at short distances, it's not that necessary.  The nanobridge has the antenna built in, just point them at each other, and a few minutes programming and that's it.  You'll have it set up in no time and it'll cost as much as the fuel to dig the ditch.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2014, 02:47:36 pm by Mike Reigh »
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Brian Bolly

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #32 on: January 17, 2014, 03:02:21 pm »



THIS!!

I've installed my share of Ubiqiti equipment and it rocks.  If you need NLOS, they have a 900 Mhz solution that propagates through trees fairly well, even at half a mile.  Some come with a dish, but at short distances, it's not that necessary.  The nanobridge has the antenna built in, just point them at each other, and a few minutes programming and that's it.  You'll have it set up in no time and it'll cost as much as the fuel to dig the ditch.

You bring up a good point, Mike.  I didn't even think about a Tx/Rx combo, but that actually makes a lot of sense.  I didn't realize they were that inexpensive either.  I've heard good things about the other Ubiquiti products, just never had an opportunity to use them.  I'll have to remember the Nanobridge the next time I need to do more outdoor networking.
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ThomasKielhofner

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #33 on: January 17, 2014, 07:22:44 pm »

*Best Solution*

Point to point wireless bridges between the house and shop

If you run copper cable underground (even just 225') you will have lightning issues at one point or another. Could be small, could be tragic (depending on how many and what kind of devices you have networked together). Even with surge protection.

Ubiquiti or similar wireless bridges would give you all the bandwidth you should need, and don't require breaking out the trencher. If you want to avoid the existing wifi range use either 5 GHz or 900 MHz bridges instead.

The other option would be optical fiber ran between the two buildings, but that sounds like it'd be over kill for your application.
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Dave Aubuchon

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #34 on: January 18, 2014, 08:31:28 pm »

Let me say that I would much prefer linking the 2 buildings via a wire than going wireless, even if you do go wireless once you're indoors.  But, I have used this setup before outdoors, and it works great.  My guess is that if you set up a WAP inside your metal building, getting much of any signal at the house isn't going to happen - the building is probably acting as a bit of a Faraday cage, and knocking down the majority of any signal.

Ubiquiti Bullet M5:  http://www.ubnt.com/airmax#bulletm
Ubiquiti POE adapters:  http://www.ubnt.com/airmax#poe  (I think it's the 24v version, but read the M5 spec)

For antennas, I have used this one but it is an omni antenna:
http://www.l-com.com/wireless-antenna-58-ghz-8-dbi-omnidirectional-wireless-lan-antenna

In your situation, I'd probably want something a bit more directional.  Lcom makes some, as does Ubiquiti.

http://www.l-com.com/wireless-antenna-58-ghz-wifi-antennas
http://www.ubnt.com/airmax#airMaxAntennas

In total, you're probably looking at $200 or so in parts.
Thanks Brian I'm moving into the house this weekend. So first of next week I will check this out.
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Dave Aubuchon

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #35 on: January 18, 2014, 08:43:45 pm »



THIS!!

I've installed my share of Ubiqiti equipment and it rocks.  If you need NLOS, they have a 900 Mhz solution that propagates through trees fairly well, even at half a mile.  Some come with a dish, but at short distances, it's not that necessary.  The nanobridge has the antenna built in, just point them at each other, and a few minutes programming and that's it.  You'll have it set up in no time and it'll cost as much as the fuel to dig the ditch.
Hi Mike
Like I said before I'm a old analog guy. I've never done anything like that before. Whatever you can do to help me become informed would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks Dave
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Craig Clifton

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #36 on: January 19, 2014, 05:32:34 am »

Hi Mike
Like I said before I'm a old analog guy. I've never done anything like that before. Whatever you can do to help me become informed would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks Dave

Hi
       I agree with going wireless with ubiquiti links. Nanobridges are inexpensive and when setup correctly, act just like a cat5 cable connection. The biggest problem with them is the information you get with them about setting them up is very scant. Here is a link that shows some configurations for wireless links.
http://wiki.ubnt.com/Beanstalk
One important thing to adhere to when using this stuff, is to use grounded/shielded cat5 cable. This is to protect against static and lightning damage to the wireless tx/rx.
Again wiki.ubnt.com is a useful source of information.
Craig

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Randy Pence

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #37 on: January 19, 2014, 09:50:43 am »

Most people leave their routers/access points at full power. Most of them probably don't even know they can change it, and the ones that do know probably figure that full power will give them better speed. The truth is that it really doesn't get you higher speed, it just gives greater range. The problem is that if you aren't controlling your range, you are interfering with your neighbor's WiFi signals (and your neighbor is interfering with yours). If everyone turned down their power settings to only cover their own property, everyone would probably get better speed because the interference (S/N ratio) would be lower!

Has anyone here done RF coordination of WiFi in their own neighborhoods? (I live out in the sticks, and can't detect any other neighborhood WiFi, so it's not an issue for me.)

...done ranting.

I live in an apartment building in a densely populated area.  There are presently around 3 dozen visible wifi networks around me, whether from in the same building, neighboring buildings, or across the street.  Most use the default settings.  I once changed the channel settings on mine to something which not shared by as many neighbors, but i did not notice any change in speed.
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Mike Reigh

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #38 on: January 19, 2014, 09:18:44 pm »

Hi Mike
Like I said before I'm a old analog guy. I've never done anything like that before. Whatever you can do to help me become informed would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks Dave

Sure, feel free to drop me a PM and I'll get you some info. I'd even lend you a physical hand but you're probably a ways away from me.
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Dave Aubuchon

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #39 on: January 22, 2014, 04:44:01 pm »

Hi
       I agree with going wireless with ubiquiti links. Nanobridges are inexpensive and when setup correctly, act just like a cat5 cable connection. The biggest problem with them is the information you get with them about setting them up is very scant. Here is a link that shows some configurations for wireless links.
http://wiki.ubnt.com/Beanstalk
One important thing to adhere to when using this stuff, is to use grounded/shielded cat5 cable. This is to protect against static and lightning damage to the wireless tx/rx.
Again wiki.ubnt.com is a useful source of information.
Craig
After looking at the link Craig provided this is how I receive my internet. There is a very tall grain bin in town (approximately 3 miles away) they send me a signal from it and I receive it with my radio.
 I was getting voice over IP for my business phone service from them too. But about 4 months ago it started dropping out, like a cell phone. After replacing a lot of equipment they came to the conclusion that it was interference. They said that audio was more susceptible to interference that the internet...So I have to drop the voice over IP and get raped again by the phone company.
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