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Author Topic: Need to get internet from shop to home  (Read 3692 times)

Brian Bolly

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2014, 06:28:17 pm »

Hi everyone thanks in advance.
 I need to get internet from my shop to my new house 100ft. away. I live on a farm. I currently get internet by way of radio signal from town to me.
I know I could run a cable from my router to my home. But seeing how that's 100ft. I don't know how good my signal would be once I get there. Also Shop building has a metal siding exterior so at 100ft I don't think Wi-Fi would work.
 Anybody get any idea's?

If you don't feel like trenching for cable, a good outdoor WAP and antenna should work.  I like the Ubiquiti M5-HP APs and a good 5GHz outdoor antenna (Try LCom).  Ubiquiti also makes more directional APs/antennae if you want to point it over *there*.  Just make sure the security settings on your network are up to snuff.
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Dave Aubuchon

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2014, 06:41:46 pm »

If you don't feel like trenching for cable, a good outdoor WAP and antenna should work.  I like the Ubiquiti M5-HP APs and a good 5GHz outdoor antenna (Try LCom).  Ubiquiti also makes more directional APs/antennae if you want to point it over *there*.  Just make sure the security settings on your network are up to snuff.
Well I was way off on my guess on length. After breaking out the tape measure I'm about 225ft. all said and done. Because I live in a rural area I can only get 5mg download speed.
Brian can you send me links to the 2 items I would need to do it your way. So As to give me a idea of cost.
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Dave Aubuchon

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2014, 06:44:35 pm »

Dave,

Digging is a lot of work, and direct connections have drawbacks.

My metal walled shop is about 150 feet from the wireless modem located in my house (which has metal lath), I have no trouble picking up the Wi-Fi signal full strength from it, or a half dozen other signals from other houses that are a minimum of 300 feet away.

A friend recently had a lightning strike which rendered his Wi Fi modem and the computer hard wired to it, and the keyboard sound module hard wired to it all junk.

Had he used the wireless option, the computer and sound module would have been fine.

The only thing I have hard wired to the modem is the TV, but I'm not too worried about loosing that in a lightning strike, but computers are a drag to replace even if you have them all backed up.

The guy that had told my friend to hard wire from his modem also had his hard wired computer destroyed by a lightning strike.

Art
Art what router do you have to get that kind of distance? What was the cost?
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Josh Millward

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2014, 07:41:07 pm »

Hi everyone thanks in advance.
 I need to get internet from my shop to my new house 100ft. away. I live on a farm. I currently get internet by way of radio signal from town to me.
I know I could run a cable from my router to my home. But seeing how that's 100ft. I don't know how good my signal would be once I get there. Also Shop building has a metal siding exterior so at 100ft I don't think Wi-Fi would work.
 Anybody get any idea's?

Hi Dave,

I'm looking at doing the same sort of thing, but the other way around.

I live out in the sticks where there is no DSL nor cable service. I solved the connectivity issue by going with Exede Satellite Internet Service from Viasat. Yes, it does cost me about $90 per month and I get up to 15GB of downloaded data, so you have to pay attention to how much you are downloading or do your movies and big downloads between midnight and 6AM (no download restrictions). Anyway, I pay for 12Mb download speed and 3Mb upload speed, but last time I tested it I was getting closer to 20Mb down and 3Mb up. The only downside I have been able to find to the Exede service is the ping times. They are LOOOONG. I'm talking minimum of 635mS long. However, this doesn't matter for streaming movies or music.

Anyway, as I said, I'm looking to do something similar. I'm building a shop / storage building at my house and I would like to have power, water, and network out there in the shop. I think it is going to be about 150 feet away from the house, so I think I'm going to just go rent a ditch-witch type trencher and have it cut a trench from my house out to the shop location. Then I'm going to dump some big power cable, a water line, and probably four direct burial CAT 5e cables (or more likely a two inch conduit to put said cables into later).

Even at the 225 foot distance that your shop is from the house, you are still WELL under the 328 foot maximum length of an Ethernet run. I recommend that you run that Ethernet cable up to the house and put yourself a WiFi access point at the end of it. That way you will have good, strong WiFi coverage throughout your new home.

Have fun and good luck!
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Josh Millward
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frank kayser

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2014, 09:04:37 pm »

Hi Dave,
<snip>

 I think I'm going to just go rent a ditch-witch type trencher and have it cut a trench from my house out to the shop location. Then I'm going to dump some big power cable, a water line, and probably four direct burial CAT 5e cables (or more likely a two inch conduit to put said cables into later).

<snip>

Have fun and good luck!

Couple questions to the chorus;
Is it legal to run power and water in the same trench?
Is it a good idea?

is it a good idea (or legal) to run power and Low voltage Cat 5e in the same conduit?
Seems one would be asking for some interference on the ethernet  from a long run parallel to power.

Thoughts?

frank
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Dave Aubuchon

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2014, 09:22:31 pm »

Hi Dave,

I'm looking at doing the same sort of thing, but the other way around.

I live out in the sticks where there is no DSL nor cable service. I solved the connectivity issue by going with Exede Satellite Internet Service from Viasat. Yes, it does cost me about $90 per month and I get up to 15GB of downloaded data, so you have to pay attention to how much you are downloading or do your movies and big downloads between midnight and 6AM (no download restrictions). Anyway, I pay for 12Mb download speed and 3Mb upload speed, but last time I tested it I was getting closer to 20Mb down and 3Mb up. The only downside I have been able to find to the Exede service is the ping times. They are LOOOONG. I'm talking minimum of 635mS long. However, this doesn't matter for streaming movies or music.

Anyway, as I said, I'm looking to do something similar. I'm building a shop / storage building at my house and I would like to have power, water, and network out there in the shop. I think it is going to be about 150 feet away from the house, so I think I'm going to just go rent a ditch-witch type trencher and have it cut a trench from my house out to the shop location. Then I'm going to dump some big power cable, a water line, and probably four direct burial CAT 5e cables (or more likely a two inch conduit to put said cables into later).

Even at the 225 foot distance that your shop is from the house, you are still WELL under the 328 foot maximum length of an Ethernet run. I recommend that you run that Ethernet cable up to the house and put yourself a WiFi access point at the end of it. That way you will have good, strong WiFi coverage throughout your new home.

Have fun and good luck!
Hi Josh
I love living on a farm. I can make all the noise I want. I will have to check out Exede. Hughsnet was my only other option and I 've heard horror stories about them.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2014, 09:26:53 pm by Dave Aubuchon »
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Corey Scogin

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2014, 10:46:11 pm »

is it a good idea (or legal) to run power and Low voltage Cat 5e in the same conduit?

No.
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Josh Millward

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2014, 09:50:04 am »

Couple questions to the chorus;
Is it legal to run power and water in the same trench?
Is it a good idea?

Assuming some separation, there is no issue with this. Zero separation happens a LOT more than you would think, especially out in the sticks. There will be plenty of room to put them in and not have them all wound up with one another. If I cut a 36" deep trench and put the power at the bottom, there is plenty of room to stack stuff in the trench with layers of dirt between them. Hell, around here, a lot of the water pipe and underground telephone cables are not even a foot below grade. Is that a good idea? It doesn't matter that it would freeze in no time flat up in Minnesota... this is Mississippi and it just doesn't get that cold here. Likewise, I cut through a 25 pair telephone cable in my front yard with a shovel because it was only 4 inches below grade. Was that a good idea?

is it a good idea (or legal) to run power and Low voltage Cat 5e in the same conduit?
Seems one would be asking for some interference on the ethernet  from a long run parallel to power.

I didn't say I was going to put the power in the same pipe with the Ethernet cable. Read for content, then read for context. There is NO WAY a bundle with three 0000 and one 00 aluminum direct burial cables will fit by themselves into a two inch conduit, let alone adding some CAT 5e cables to it (which you are not supposed to do anyway). The two inch conduit is only for the low voltage cabling, the power cable is directly buried by itself.

Thoughts?

frank

I'll guarantee you one thing, I'm going to do it to a better standard than I see a lot of things around here done. It will be safe, it will work well, and I'll have a shop with power, water, and network connectivity.
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Josh Millward
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Josh Millward

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2014, 10:10:05 am »

Hi Josh
I love living on a farm. I can make all the noise I want. I will have to check out Exede. Hughsnet was my only other option and I 've heard horror stories about them.
Yeah, I love the fact that I can sit out on my huge deck and see all the stars at night, especially when the moon is new.

I was using an AT&T MiFi for internet service before I picked up the Exede service. The MiFi was a pain in the ass as it would barely connect to 3G cell service at that time, but I guess 4G LTE service is available around here now... regardless, I'm glad to have the Exede service. It has been extremely reliable and like I said, I'm getting way faster download speeds than what was originally advertised.

I've heard some bad stuff about Hughesnet too, so I was happy to find that Exede is provided by Viasat instead. Viasat previously provided a service called Wildblue, but it was extremely limited in speed.
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Josh Millward
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Need to get internet from shop to home
« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2014, 11:42:30 am »

I'd go for wired. If you're concerned about lightning strikes propagating through the wires, you can install surge suppressors (for what they're worth) in the CAT5x/6 line.

To me, the biggest argument against WiFi is congestion in the 2.4GHz band. If you are in an urban, suburban, or dense rural environment, the ubiquity of WiFi access points owned and installed by your neighbors can be overwhelming. Since it's a shared spectrum, the more of them there are, the more interference there will be so the lower your signal:noise ratio will be. That means lower transmission speeds. Run a utility like inSSIDer and you'll see what I mean.

If you can do 5 GHz, you'll likely be better off because there is a wider usable band and fewer users, but 5 GHz doesn't have as long a range, and it's more susceptible to dropouts due to stuff getting in the line-of-site (like steel walls).

Rant on...

Most people leave their routers/access points at full power. Most of them probably don't even know they can change it, and the ones that do know probably figure that full power will give them better speed. The truth is that it really doesn't get you higher speed, it just gives greater range. The problem is that if you aren't controlling your range, you are interfering with your neighbor's WiFi signals (and your neighbor is interfering with yours). If everyone turned down their power settings to only cover their own property, everyone would probably get better speed because the interference (S/N ratio) would be lower!

Has anyone here done RF coordination of WiFi in their own neighborhoods? (I live out in the sticks, and can't detect any other neighborhood WiFi, so it's not an issue for me.)

...done ranting.
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Stop confusing the issue with facts and logic!
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