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Author Topic: Wireless, pedal boards and cabling  (Read 1283 times)

Brad Harris

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Wireless, pedal boards and cabling
« on: November 06, 2013, 08:48:37 pm »

So a client of mine would like to run wireless for their bass rig.


Shure UR receivers offstage, 50' run to their position, and 100' back to the bass head (in a round about way).


Did a few tests in the shop


1) Unbalanced the whole way with XLR and TS adapters -- Worked great (in the warehouse), but being unbalanced ..... susceptible for noise


2) Rapco Isoblox in/out of the pedal board, and into the head -- Worked, but they are not beefy enough for the signal


3) Passive DIs out of the UR receiver, In/Out of the pedal board, and into the head -- Worked great, but did colour the sound quite a bit. Removing the second pair (pedal board out -> head in) brought the tone back, but then there is a 100' unbalanced run with power, lighting, video around it ...


So, anything on the market that will nicely balance/unbalance signals in a small (1/2 the size of a DI) and won't break the bank?




I also recall a few years ago reading in one of the audio mags about a country starlet we've heard about and mentioning all the wireless and 1/4" runs they had for tuners and such .....




BRad
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Brian Bolly

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Re: Wireless, pedal boards and cabling
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2013, 09:36:23 pm »

So, anything on the market that will nicely balance/unbalance signals in a small (1/2 the size of a DI) and won't break the bank?

How much is a solid signal worth?

Radial makes a couple.  The SGI would be my initial go-to:  Radial SGI

Depending on how your routing works, the SGI-44 may be better (or not):  Radial SGI-44
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Jerome Malsack

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Re: Wireless, pedal boards and cabling
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2013, 10:08:23 pm »

Rolls for the low dollar end   

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/155445-REG/Rolls_MP13_MP13_Mini_Microphone_Preamp.html

I have a pair of M-audio Mic buddy that I use.   
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Nicolas Lowman

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Re: Wireless, pedal boards and cabling
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2013, 02:18:38 am »

I second the Radial stuff for these applications. The SGI stuff is great and does what it is suppose to. While you are looking at stuff, check out the JX44 as well, because it might do some things that you need.

Another option might be the little labs stuff.
http://littlelabs.com/std.html

I haven't used any of their products personally but they have some options for this stuff.

Having done this thing before, it is best to spend the money for the right product and it will make your life much better down the road.
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Brad Harris

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Re: Wireless, pedal boards and cabling
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2013, 10:27:51 am »

I've been looking at Radials JCR and SGI as a solution, although a little more bulkier and pricier than I anticipated, but it's pretty much bullet proof.


I second the Radial stuff for these applications. The SGI stuff is great and does what it is suppose to.


With the SGI, does the Tx need to have DC power? Also, would that signal between the Tx and Rx be usable as a console input?


Thanks for your input,



BRad
« Last Edit: November 07, 2013, 10:32:51 am by Brad Harris »
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Nicolas Lowman

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Re: Wireless, pedal boards and cabling
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2013, 12:48:56 pm »

I've been looking at Radials JCR and SGI as a solution, although a little more bulkier and pricier than I anticipated, but it's pretty much bullet proof.



With the SGI, does the Tx need to have DC power? Also, would that signal between the Tx and Rx be usable as a console input?

 

Thanks for your input,



BRad



Yes, on the SGI, the TX does require  DC power. It is a 15 VDC, so it is a little bit of an odd voltage as well.

Be sure to look at all of the options that they have available.

I setup a system with the JX44 and the SGI44. It works great. It is also worth considering a multipin to your pedal board to make it easier to patch on a daily basis.
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Jens Palm Bacher

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Re: Wireless, pedal boards and cabling
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2013, 02:02:54 pm »

50' (15 meters) is not a lot, i would propose to stay unbalanced from the UR receiver to the pedal board and then use a Radial SGI from the board to the amp.

So a client of mine would like to run wireless for their bass rig.


Shure UR receivers offstage, 50' run to their position, and 100' back to the bass head (in a round about way).


Did a few tests in the shop


1) Unbalanced the whole way with XLR and TS adapters -- Worked great (in the warehouse), but being unbalanced ..... susceptible for noise


2) Rapco Isoblox in/out of the pedal board, and into the head -- Worked, but they are not beefy enough for the signal


3) Passive DIs out of the UR receiver, In/Out of the pedal board, and into the head -- Worked great, but did colour the sound quite a bit. Removing the second pair (pedal board out -> head in) brought the tone back, but then there is a 100' unbalanced run with power, lighting, video around it ...


So, anything on the market that will nicely balance/unbalance signals in a small (1/2 the size of a DI) and won't break the bank?




I also recall a few years ago reading in one of the audio mags about a country starlet we've heard about and mentioning all the wireless and 1/4" runs they had for tuners and such .....




BRad
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Mike Caldwell

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Re: Wireless, pedal boards and cabling
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2013, 12:19:33 pm »

Something to watch for is that the wireless receiver does not overdrive the pedal input creating a consistent distorted undertone. Even though the guitar players didn't seem to notice I've heard that on a few rigs for all guitar types. While you using a good wireless system I always find it funny when a bass player shows up with something like a $2000 bass and a $150 Nady wireless system that has as much white noise as it does bass guitar in the output signal.

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