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Author Topic: Announcer voice compression  (Read 3397 times)

John Alves

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Announcer voice compression
« on: March 08, 2013, 02:42:36 pm »

Hi everyone,

First off let me state that I am not a audio professional but a video professional looking for some info and I figure you guys are probably the best place to turn to.

I produce live sports for a national station. We shoot everything to tape and then post the whole show and have our play by play and colour guys do the voiceovers after the fact which has been working well.

The one stumbling block I've had is that during the event there is a event announcer and I use his intros. I'm getting this off the house feed but I don't have a proper audio guy mixing it as its the only time he would be needed. The levels can be a bit erratic so I want to run him through a compressor on his way to the record deck. Can you suggest a good affordable limiter/compressor for this type of audio.

I have been trying to research this on the web but it seems every time its someone talking about how the compressor works in a band scenario and I'm concerned that I may need something that would act different. Any help is much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
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Scott Helmke

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Re: Announcer voice compression
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2013, 01:55:51 pm »

A dbx 166A or a 1066 would be fine, and easy enough to find a decent used one.
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David Sturzenbecher

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Re: Announcer voice compression
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2013, 03:54:48 pm »

A Symetrix 528e is what I most commonly see on announcer's. I don't have a huge background with them other then tweaking the knobs on one a couple of times though.
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James A. Griffin

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Re: Announcer voice compression
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2013, 05:37:20 pm »

I don't know the set up at the venue, but it's possible you have two issuse:

1)  Erratic volume from announcer due to his enthusiasm and/or moving in relation to mic

2)  House mixer guy trying to compensate for 1) by riding the level, perhaps mucking up further.

A possible solution might be to take a split from his mic before it goes to house mixer.     That way the signal yo'll have to work with in post hasn't been processed by the house mixer.

What are you editing the show with?   All professional video editing software programs have audio EQ / Compression / Effects available in the program.     
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Announcer voice compression
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2013, 06:22:02 pm »

I don't know the set up at the venue, but it's possible you have two issuse:

1)  Erratic volume from announcer due to his enthusiasm and/or moving in relation to mic

2)  House mixer guy trying to compensate for 1) by riding the level, perhaps mucking up further.

A possible solution might be to take a split from his mic before it goes to house mixer.     That way the signal yo'll have to work with in post hasn't been processed by the house mixer.

What are you editing the show with?   All professional video editing software programs have audio EQ / Compression / Effects available in the program.   

I was asked to evaluate a problem with an arena sport announcer's intelligibility.  The microphone provided was a boutique dynamic with a very tight hypercardioid pattern.  When the announcer got excited and turned to observe action moving up and down the arena floor, he'd move out of the pattern.  I suggested a headset mic and invoiced them for a half day.

Another suggestion for the OP... if these are being recorded by your crew, how about putting a lavalier mic on the announcer?  No PA worries, no positional worries, will also pick up crowd sounds.  You'll have cleaner audio to work with in post.
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John Alves

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Re: Announcer voice compression
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2013, 11:11:26 am »

Thanks for all the suggestions. I have been looking into the DBx and it is a front runner. I have heard good things about the Behringer MDX4600 4-Channel MultiCom Pro-X but I question behringers quality.

I am taking a split off the house so I'm getting a direct line. The main problem is that the announcer will give me a constant level and then suddenly will almost be yelling and obviously distorting.
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Announcer voice compression
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2013, 12:30:47 pm »

Thanks for all the suggestions. I have been looking into the DBx and it is a front runner. I have heard good things about the Behringer MDX4600 4-Channel MultiCom Pro-X but I question behringers quality.

I am taking a split off the house so I'm getting a direct line. The main problem is that the announcer will give me a constant level and then suddenly will almost be yelling and obviously distorting.

Where is the distortion coming from, the house or the mixer/recorder your crew is using?  If the announcer is overloading the input to the house mixer there is nothing you can do to fix it.  If the distortion is on your end, then simply turning it down and taking care of levels in post would work.  What is wrong with my suggestion that your crew use its own lav mic on the announcer?
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John Alves

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Re: Announcer voice compression
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2013, 01:06:21 pm »

This is for a boxing in ring announcer. He won't want to get rid of his handheld plus he needs to hold it in front if the ref as he talks to the boxers. I'm getting a direct feed from his mic (wireless mic two receivers. House has one I have one) it distorts on our mixer but its a small production so I don't really have a dedicated audio person so peaks can distort. It's not that bad but I had a little overdriven audio on my last show so I want to av sound future problems.
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Steve Milner

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Re: Announcer voice compression
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2013, 01:53:22 pm »

- I don't really have a dedicated audio person so peaks can distort.
- It's not that bad but I had a little overdriven audio on my last show.
- I want to av sound future problems.

  So, you don't want to hire an audio guy... but you would like free advise from an audio community, so you can go ahead and avoid hiring one of us... for your NATIONAL broadcast.
   
  Hopefully someone in the future doesn't decide to half-ass your job, and send you home so they can do it themselves... with some free advise from a pro-video forum of-course.

 Welcome to the community... I guess.  :-\

 

John Alves

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Re: Announcer voice compression
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2013, 02:06:28 pm »

Actually for your information this show was going to be cancelled and to save work for a few of us we found ways to make it work on a lower budget. If I had more budget I'd hire an audio guy but its not there. In the end I'd rather hire a few guys then not have any of us work. I get where your coming from but were just trying to salvage a show that hopefully we can build into something bigger.
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